Irish passport holders living in Northern Ireland will not get free EU healthcare

Sword of Gideon

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The Irish government will not be paying for free healthcare in other EU countries for Irish passport holders living in Northern Ireland after the UK leaves the EU.

So much for having an Irish passport giving you the same rights as other Irish citizens.
 


theloner

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Lol
 

hollandia

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The Irish government will not be paying for free healthcare in other EU countries for Irish passport holders living in Northern Ireland after the UK leaves the EU.

So much for having an Irish passport giving you the same rights as other Irish citizens.
If you have an E110 card, tough in the Irish Government. :)

As an aside - no link. Zoo.
 

Supra

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The Irish government will not be paying for free healthcare in other EU countries for Irish passport holders living in Northern Ireland after the UK leaves the EU.

So much for having an Irish passport giving you the same rights as other Irish citizens.
Seems there's nothing to worry about.
 

Aindriu

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This is a load of bollax because if they are living in NI and paying national insurance contributions and tax they are entitled to free at the point of need healthcare.
 

hollandia

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This is a load of bollax because if they are living in NI and paying national insurance contributions and tax they are entitled to free at the point of need healthcare.
It's quite the worst attempt at a flame thread I've ever seen on P.ie. And I've seen most of Bridgey's.
 

McSlaggart

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The Irish government will not be paying for free healthcare in other EU countries for Irish passport holders living in Northern Ireland after the UK leaves the EU.

So much for having an Irish passport giving you the same rights as other Irish citizens.
You would need a link to support this claim. It will be interesting how the UK government pay for the cost of such Health care.
 

Sword of Gideon

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Vadarkar was asked if the Irish government would fund the health costs for a Northern Ireland Irish passport holder seeking an operation elsewhere in the EU, his answer was that he was not sure Dublin would pay the bill.
He pointed out that Irish passport holders not habitually resident in the EU are not necessarily entitled to such care.
"I wouldn't be planning to change that. The costs would be phenomenal and I think our taxpayers would have difficulty bearing that."
 

McSlaggart

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Vadarkar was asked if the Irish government would fund the health costs for a Northern Ireland Irish passport holder seeking an operation elsewhere in the EU, his answer was that he was not sure Dublin would pay the bill.
He pointed out that Irish passport holders not habitually resident in the EU are not necessarily entitled to such care.
"I wouldn't be planning to change that. The costs would be phenomenal and I think our taxpayers would have difficulty bearing that."
I would think the UK government will have to pay for the people who live in Norther Ireland who have an Irish passport due to the GFA.

Note:
The reason for the existence of this card, is that the right to health care in Europe is based on the country of legal residence, not the country of citizenship. Therefore, a passport is not enough to receive health care. It is however possible that a photo ID document is asked for, since the European Health Insurance Card does not contain a photo.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Health_Insurance_Card
 

Sword of Gideon

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I would think the UK government will have to pay for the people who live in Norther Ireland who have an Irish passport due to the GFA.

Note:
The reason for the existence of this card, is that the right to health care in Europe is based on the country of legal residence, not the country of citizenship. Therefore, a passport is not enough to receive health care. It is however possible that a photo ID document is asked for, since the European Health Insurance Card does not contain a photo.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Health_Insurance_Card
Not what Vadarkar thinks, did you and others not listen to what he said on Spotlight,(to which you contributed to a 14 page thread) this week.
 

O'Sullivan Bere

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Not what Vadarkar thinks, did you and others not listen to what he said on Spotlight,(to which you contributed to a 14 page thread) this week.
The EHIC rules are part of it, but granted, the ROI could decide independently to pay the tab for nonresident citizens.

That said, Leo's point is valid IMO, even though it's not in my own self interest to agree with that being someone not ordinarily resident at this time. If you're not living in the ROI, then you're not paying the same levels and/or kinds of taxes as residents do, if any at all for a large percent of nonresident citizens. That becomes unaffordable if over 1 million NI residents and loads of diaspora--especially granny rule citizens that could amount to millions--get the ROI taxpayers to pick up the tabs for serious and/or regular treatments without proper contribution. Gaming the system would become a high incentive with that.

The rules apply to all Irish citizens, though, so there's equity in handling. If you or I relocate into the ROI where we start paying the same kinds and levels of taxes as the rest, we become eligible. If anyone leaves, then they become ineligible.

Living outside the ROI doesn't mean the citizenship is worthless. Quite the contrary, it's still an extremely valuable thing to have, and IMO it's foolish for anyone not to acquire it if they don't already have it. If you picked it up--and you can have it concurrently with your British citizenship--you'll be an EU citizen for all rights to travel, work, etc, within the EU, EEA and Switzerland. You'll get loads of better options in some third party nations for visas. You'll also get the diplomatic protections too. That's handy if you're in a nation that's unfriendly to the UK, etc. And of course, if you ever relocated into the ROI, you can get everything others are entitled as residents.
 

Se0samh

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The EHIC rules are part of it, but granted, the ROI could decide independently to pay the tab for nonresident citizens.

That said, Leo's point is valid IMO, even though it's not in my own self interest to agree with that being someone not ordinarily resident at this time. If you're not living in the ROI, then you're not paying the same levels and/or kinds of taxes as residents do, if any at all for a large percent of nonresident citizens. That becomes unaffordable if over 1 million NI residents and loads of diaspora--especially granny rule citizens that could amount to millions--get the ROI taxpayers to pick up the tabs for serious and/or regular treatments without proper contribution. Gaming the system would become a high incentive with that.

The rules apply to all Irish citizens, though, so there's equity in handling. If you or I relocate into the ROI where we start paying the same kinds and levels of taxes as the rest, we become eligible. If anyone leaves, then they become ineligible.

Living outside the ROI doesn't mean the citizenship is worthless. Quite the contrary, it's still an extremely valuable thing to have, and IMO it's foolish for anyone not to acquire it if they don't already have it. If you picked it up--and you can have it concurrently with your British citizenship--you'll be an EU citizen for all rights to travel, work, etc, within the EU, EEA and Switzerland. You'll get loads of better options in some third party nations for visas. You'll also get the diplomatic protections too. That's handy if you're in a nation that's unfriendly to the UK, etc. And of course, if you ever relocated into the ROI, you can get everything others are entitled as residents.

Or the UK could compensate Ireland for the payout as part of the Brexit deal............:D
 


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