Irish peat burning five times worse per head than Brazil's rain forest fires

offalypat

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Peat represents around10% to 15% of the energy used to generate electricity and is due for phasing out by 2028 not immediately. The heritage and biodiversity value of peat is more important than the emissions arising from using it.

Would stopping beef and dairy production in the whole west of Ireland result In less exports rather than a need for imports?

https://www.independent.ie/news/environment/plan-to-change-how-electricity-is-produced-and-consumed-here-38228802.html

The target is to achieve 70pc renewable electricity by 2030. This will involve the phasing out of coal and peat-fired electricity generation plants. ESB's Moneypoint plant will close by 2025. Bord na Móna will transition away from peat by 2028.


https://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/why-peat-is-most-damaging-fuel-in-terms-of-global-warming-even-worse-than-coal-1.3674537

Peat was responsible for 3.4 million tonnes of emissions in Ireland during 2016, of which 75 per cent was for electricity and 25 per cent in residential heating (which is about 9 per cent of carbon emissions from total fossil fuel use (including coal, oil, gas and peat). Phasing out that heat component will make a big difference to Ireland’s emissions.

The peat issue was so glaring, the Government’s independent Climate Change Advisory Council repeatedly said Bord na Móna should get out of peat a lot sooner than envisaged, though it underlined the need for “a just transition” for workers and communities affected. Its chairman Prof John FitzGerald has gone further, hitting out at the perverse decision to continue subsidising peat-fired electricity generation stations until 2030 – consumers pay for this through the public service obligation (PSO), a levy added to their electricity bill.

[/QUOT the fact of the matter is no matter what is used to generate energy there will always be waste the choice that has to be made is which waste is most harmful to the lives of every mammal on the planet on that basis burning turf is way down the list if you look down on earth from outer space the most of the planet is lit up with street lights how much more harm is that doing compared to burning turf in a fire there is a hidden agenda behind all this crap and MONEY is the real target and not global warming or climate change so people need to cop on.
 


wombat

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Sixty years? It is so dangerous it has to be entombed for countless thousands of years? Damnable form of boiling a kettle.
Nuclear power has been in use for about 60 years and the waste has been stored for about that time, it can be done. It seems that the Irish govt believes we should start driving electric cars, fine, we will need to produce a lot more electricity than currently. They also want to move away from using fossil fuels. Windmills won't cut it.
 

Patslatt1

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Turf cutting was a small part of out electricity generation and is immediately due for discontinuance.

The bigger question is should we stop beef and dairy production in the whole west of Ireland and import the beef from South America.

The impact of clearing tropical forest, transporting beef thousands of miles has climate change costs.
Water transport is very cheap and energy efficient where the cattle are relatively near a port.. The beef can be aged on the way to destination.
Ireland's case for beef is that the grassland beef are a superior product to cattle raised in feed lots and indoors.
 
Last edited:

Patslatt1

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Joined
Nov 18, 2009
Messages
4,086
Peat represents around10% to 15% of the energy used to generate electricity and is due for phasing out by 2028 not immediately. The heritage and biodiversity value of peat is more important than the emissions arising from using it.

Would stopping beef and dairy production in the whole west of Ireland result In less exports rather than a need for imports?

https://www.independent.ie/news/environment/plan-to-change-how-electricity-is-produced-and-consumed-here-38228802.html

The target is to achieve 70pc renewable electricity by 2030. This will involve the phasing out of coal and peat-fired electricity generation plants. ESB's Moneypoint plant will close by 2025. Bord na Móna will transition away from peat by 2028.


https://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/why-peat-is-most-damaging-fuel-in-terms-of-global-warming-even-worse-than-coal-1.3674537

Peat was responsible for 3.4 million tonnes of emissions in Ireland during 2016, of which 75 per cent was for electricity and 25 per cent in residential heating (which is about 9 per cent of carbon emissions from total fossil fuel use (including coal, oil, gas and peat). Phasing out that heat component will make a big difference to Ireland’s emissions.

The peat issue was so glaring, the Government’s independent Climate Change Advisory Council repeatedly said Bord na Móna should get out of peat a lot sooner than envisaged, though it underlined the need for “a just transition” for workers and communities affected. Its chairman Prof John FitzGerald has gone further, hitting out at the perverse decision to continue subsidising peat-fired electricity generation stations until 2030 – consumers pay for this through the public service obligation (PSO), a levy added to their electricity bill.
Devalera's Ireland
"perverse decision to continue subsidising peat" is just populist politics.
ESB gives a subsidy to Bord Na Mona that is used to support a variety of businesses, a relic of Devalera's Ireland that should be in museums.
 

Patslatt1

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The biggest problem we face is how to replace Moneypoint. Since nuclear power is politically unacceptable, the only practical solution is to replace the coal fired capacity with natural gas. This can only be an interim solution, sooner or later we will have to either use nuclear power or drastically reduce electricity use.
With interconnectors to NI, British mainland and France supplying backup power as needed,, wind farms should be the best option.
 

wombat

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With interconnectors to NI, British mainland and France supplying backup power as needed,, wind farms should be the best option.
Any idea where another 600MW of windmills will be located?
 


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