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Irish people who went to Britain to help her in the war efforts during WWII


T

Thomas_

I was wondering if there´s any book about stories from Irish people who went to Britain to take up jobs to replace the British men serving in the forces, and so helping in the war efforts.

Anyone on here who has read anything about that?
 
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Angela's Ashes?
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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The Kamu Sutra is full of information on people changing positions; although I'm not sure if this extends to during bloody periods
 
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I´m not referring to novels like that of Frank McCourt, I´m more asking for something more factual, like memories from that time.
Arrr, I know. I was just kidding, but in a sort of serious way. I've heard a lot of stories of men who abandoned their families in this way.
 

drummed

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Ok. I've never come across such a book but it sounds like a good idea. I did once meet a man who was an RAF training instructor who was from Kilkenny and only went along cause he loved flying. Now deceased sadly.
 
D

Dylan2010

wasnt there a lot of resentemnt to people who went to work in NI?
 
T

Thomas_

Arrr, I know. I was just kidding, but in a sort of serious way. I've heard a lot of stories of men who abandoned their families in this way.
These were difficult times and I suppose that it wasn´t popular to go to Britain for helping in the war effort either. It was probably an opportunity to get work in times of high unemployment in Ireland. I was more thinking on the dangerous places these people went to. Facing the horrors of war at first hand on the "British Home Front".

Seems that this hasn´t been a topic for books related to Irish history. I´ve once seen one dealing with some Irishmen who went to fight on the German side during WWII. That book wasn´t of my interest.
 

james5001

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A relation of mine did. She worked in a garage.
 

james5001

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drummed

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These were difficult times and I suppose that it wasn´t popular to go to Britain for helping in the war effort either. It was probably an opportunity to get work in times of high unemployment in Ireland. I was more thinking on the dangerous places these people went to. Facing the horrors of war at first hand on the "British Home Front".

Seems that this hasn´t been a topic for books related to Irish history. I´ve once seen one dealing with some Irishmen who went to fight on the German side during WWII. That book wasn´t of my interest.
Nothing like seeking a balanced complete view of history. Best to ignore stories which don't suit the pre-arranged narrative. Saves loads of time.
 

parentheses

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I think emigration from Ireland to England actually fell in the war.

Remember Irishmen who went to Britain would be liable for conscription. Probably even some Irishmen came home to avoid conscription.

An interesting question would be: did Englishmen come to Ireland to avoid the conscription?
 

drummed

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She helped to fix buses. One of them may have been used to transport soldiers....
The current queen Elizabath trained as a mechanic during the war. She may have known her?
 

james5001

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The current queen Elizabath trained as a mechanic during the war. She may have known her?
Really? I think she mentioned that she used to wipe the windows. I think that's where her famous wave came from.
 

patfitzbally

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I have deceased relatives whom went over to England during that time,worked on aerodrome construction,were not conscripted but sent money back to their parents in Ireland to help them out.this was a regular occurance.
 

BertiesGhost

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I was wondering if there´s any book about stories from Irish people who went to Britain to take up jobs to replace the British men serving in the forces, and so helping in the war efforts.

Anyone on here who has read anything about that?
This may have happened, but many times more fought in the ranks of the British army.
At one time almost two thirds of the British armed forces were made up from Irish men.

Most of whom didn't join out of any sense of loyalty or to help with the "war efforts"
Most simply seen a chance to earn better money than they would have in Ireland, a simple matter of economics....mercenary's some might call them.
 

derryman

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This may have happened, but many times more fought in the ranks of the British army.
At one time almost two thirds of the British armed forces were made up from Irish men.

Most of whom didn't join out of any sense of loyalty or to help with the "war efforts"
Most simply seen a chance to earn better money than they would have in Ireland, a simple matter of economics....mercenary's some might call them.
Sure about that? Seems high to me
 
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