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Irish Port Capacity


locke

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Joined
May 2, 2007
Messages
3,092
An Bord Pleanála has just rejected the plans presented to them for an expansion of Dublin Port. A couple of years ago, they made a similar decision in relation to an expansion of facilities at the Port of Cork.

What all this means is that both Cork and Dublin are full and won't be expanding in the near future. Even if plans for expansion are restarted, it will be 5+ years between the start of the planning process and the provision of facilities.

Of the country's major ports, only Waterford has significant capacity available.

With a return to economic growth, that could be used up quite quickly.

As an island nation, this seems an extraordinary. Flying freight in and out of the island would be prohibitively expensive. We aren't going to see a rail link in the time frame either.

All this could act as a severe brake on our growth come the end of the decade.

So what's to be done?

Do we need a government port strategy that takes the expansion decision away from the local port authorities? Or would that be an over-reaction considering both Dublin and Cork did try to get expansion in place.

Do we need to get earlier involvement so that projects become adjusted so that they are more likely to be accepted?

Considering the major reason the Cork proposal was refused was a lack of road and rail infrastructure at the site proposed, do we need a much more integrated approach to the whole concept of port development?

And perhaps most critically, what do we do in the medium-term to mitigate the problems of capacity?
 

locke

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Joined
May 2, 2007
Messages
3,092
One year's fall can easily be filled the next year. Considering international trade tends to account for a disproportional amount of growth, once growth does return, the amount of goods flowing through the ports will increase substantially.

Port infrastructure needs to be planned over a 5-8 year period and planned capacity has to reflect that.
 

adamirer

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Joined
May 16, 2007
Messages
454
Dublin Bay is a protected area and the Port knew this, submitting their application in an attempt to scupper the idea of the 'Port' moving/expanding further up along the North East coast, be it Bremore or elsewhere. Bord Pleanala, under the EU rules, had no option but to find against Dublin Port and their spoiler tactics when the hearing was first heard last Autumn.
 
Last edited:

locke

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2007
Messages
3,092
Dublin Bay is a protected area and the Port knew this, submitting their application in an attempt to scupper the idea of the 'Port' moving/expanding further up along the NorthEast coast, be it Bremore or elsewhere. Bord Pleanala, unde rht eEU rules, had no option but to find against Dublin Port and their spoiler tactics when the hearing was first heard last Autumn.
I tend to agree. And there's probably no greater nonsense that Dublin Port selling land for development at one end, while seeking to reclaim land at the other end. In the case of the Cork application, there are questions over the impact on leisure users of Cork Harbour (although it was supporting infrastructure that led to it being refused).

But even if the plan is to move port facilities up to Drogheda or down to Arklow, those need to be put in train ASAP to stop a capacity crisis in the latter half of the decade.
 

derekbhoy

Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2008
Messages
21
Typical god damn Irish methodology, prevent a Co. pumping millions into a failed economy of a country on the verge of bankruptcy,prevent a Co. creating hundreds of jobs that wouldnt have cost a cent to the tax payer for a piece of infrastructure that is vital to a country, that let me remind you is an island.Our greatest assets are OUR seaports to get us out of this mess and what do we do we say NO for the sake of a few BIRDS. NOW WHERE IS THE LOGIC IN THAT
 

Podolski1.5

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Joined
May 31, 2009
Messages
576
not much of a surprise from a country without its own shipping fleet thanks to the stupid decision to close Irish Shipping.

We are an island nation and our ports are absolutely essential - as became even more evident during the recent volcanic ash crisis.

There's an ongoing move to privatise our ports which can only lead to more disasters like the DDDA.

In the 1970s a decision was made to create a deepwater port at Ringaskiddy despite the fact that it had no railway connection and a poor road infrastructure. The roads have since been improved but the rail connection is still a major disadvantage. Of course there's another stupid decision here too - the closure of CIE's freight division. Rail is the natural way to carry modern containers, not huge trucks trundling through city centres and towns. The Irish Rail freight yard at North Esk, on the outskirts of Cork city, looks like an abandoned dump these days and the container terminal at Tivoli is already creaking with overcapacity. The new container depot must go ahead and, in my view, the best place for it is at and around the former IFI / NET plant at Marino Point near Cobh. This area has been industrial / maritime heartland for centuries.
 

derekbhoy

Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2008
Messages
21
Another excellent advantage is Dublin port is connected to the rest of the country with a rail link
 

myksav

Well-known member
Joined
May 13, 2008
Messages
23,546
Maybe the Bórd know something the rest of us don't? Maybe they think the only export we'll have is people, for which you only need a few working airports. petunia
 

farnaby

Well-known member
Joined
May 15, 2006
Messages
1,966
Flying freight in and out of the island would be prohibitively expensive.
Depends on the product. High value and/or fast-moving product is better off being shipped via airfreight due to high indirect supply chain costs e.g. inventory carrying cost, cost of lost sales etc. Technology products for example.

On the port capacity issue, a lot depends on the current utilisation of shipping and truck capacity. Are liners going to increase shipping frequencies or do they still have extra capacity to utilise? Is there capacity that could be shifted between the container or passenger ship sectors? Are trucks leaving Ireland genuinely full-truckloads?

There is probably a lot of slack to be made up there. But you're right - the last thing we need is to suddenly face a bottleneck that drives up rates and drives down competitiveness.
 

iompar

Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2010
Messages
46
not much of a surprise from a country without its own shipping fleet thanks to the stupid decision to close Irish Shipping.

We are an island nation and our ports are absolutely essential - as became even more evident during the recent volcanic ash crisis.

There's an ongoing move to privatise our ports which can only lead to more disasters like the DDDA.

In the 1970s a decision was made to create a deepwater port at Ringaskiddy despite the fact that it had no railway connection and a poor road infrastructure. The roads have since been improved but the rail connection is still a major disadvantage. Of course there's another stupid decision here too - the closure of CIE's freight division. Rail is the natural way to carry modern containers, not huge trucks trundling through city centres and towns. The Irish Rail freight yard at North Esk, on the outskirts of Cork city, looks like an abandoned dump these days and the container terminal at Tivoli is already creaking with overcapacity. The new container depot must go ahead and, in my view, the best place for it is at and around the former IFI / NET plant at Marino Point near Cobh. This area has been industrial / maritime heartland for centuries.
Agree 500% The only problem is that some chancer bought the IFI site a few years ago for, you guessed it "residential Development". The best thing to do is for the Council to take it over on a derelict site order and sell it to Port of Cork for €1. The only limitation is that it is not quite a deep water port area as Ringaskiddy. All the Transport connections are there however and if I remember correctly good for 20,000 Tonne ships.
 
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