Irish prepared for brexit?

TippSkyBlue

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Joined
Aug 6, 2019
Messages
8
We are constantly hearing that irish businesses are not adequately preparing for brexit, and of the damage it will do for our economy. Businesses and consumers need to make a huge effort.
The UK needs to be taken out of the supply chain. There have been encouraging signs of 'brexit buster' vessels appearing at irish ports, to provide direct shipping to mainland Europe. While it is true that using landbridge is currently about 10 hours quicker, that time saving will soon be swallowed up by the expected queues at Dover in the event of no-deal.
How many times have you gone and bought a product which has been manufactured in, say, Germany, but the retailer has got it from a british distributor? This is the kind of thing which needs to change. There wil be a lot of complacency from retailers - it's too easy to pick up the phone and talk to a supplier who talks the same language. So, the price of the product will go up, the retailer will blame brexit and the customer will be daft enough to believe him, pay the price, and go away moaning about the price increase without doing anything about it.
As consumers, our shopping habits need to change. It's simple: avoid buying products from the UK. Why do we need Walkers crisps when we have Tayto? Processed foods come from the UK, so if we followed the healthy eating guidelines, and chose fresh locally sourced produce and avoided processed food, brexit would not affect the shopping bill.
Online shopping can use the EU mainland instead of the UK. I use amazon.de instead of amazon.co.uk (see my post in 'minor consequences of brexit), and you don't need to speak german. Unfortunately, search engines seem to automatically locate suppliers in the UK if they are not available in Ireland. I'm not an expert but maybe you can change the google settings?
Both the government and businesses need to spend less time trying to preserve UK trade and more time trying to find new markets in Europe. Direct shipping needs to be developed so more exporters and importers use it and therefore bring the shipping costs down.
I appreciate it will not be an option for some businesses (producers of perishable goods, like mushrooms, will be hit hard), but the vast majority of irish businesses can get round brexit - literally.
The only way for Ireland to cope with brexit is for them to move forward with Europe and let the UK rot in its no-deal utopia.
 


McTell

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Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
6,562
Twitter
No
//
The only way for Ireland to cope with brexit is for them to move forward with Europe and let the UK rot in its no-deal utopia.
We are building an extra shed to store jars of marmite that will soon be unobtainable. Guys are already buying tickets for the fast-track Q.

You have to wind people up, or else the won't get upset over nothing.
 

Myler

Active member
Joined
May 30, 2019
Messages
104
if we followed the healthy eating guidelines, and chose fresh locally sourced produce and avoided processed food, brexit would not affect the shopping bill.
Not as simple as that for food supply.

Our agricultural sector needs to re-engineer itself, so that its no longer largely dependent on exporting beef and such to the UK. Our farmers produce very little veg; so we need to import a lot of our fresh food, too.

It discussed quite a bit in a recent thread.

 

Apple in Eden

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 15, 2016
Messages
1,701
We are constantly hearing that irish businesses are not adequately preparing for brexit, and of the damage it will do for our economy. Businesses and consumers need to make a huge effort.
The UK needs to be taken out of the supply chain. There have been encouraging signs of 'brexit buster' vessels appearing at irish ports, to provide direct shipping to mainland Europe. While it is true that using landbridge is currently about 10 hours quicker, that time saving will soon be swallowed up by the expected queues at Dover in the event of no-deal.
How many times have you gone and bought a product which has been manufactured in, say, Germany, but the retailer has got it from a british distributor? This is the kind of thing which needs to change. There wil be a lot of complacency from retailers - it's too easy to pick up the phone and talk to a supplier who talks the same language. So, the price of the product will go up, the retailer will blame brexit and the customer will be daft enough to believe him, pay the price, and go away moaning about the price increase without doing anything about it.
As consumers, our shopping habits need to change. It's simple: avoid buying products from the UK. Why do we need Walkers crisps when we have Tayto? Processed foods come from the UK, so if we followed the healthy eating guidelines, and chose fresh locally sourced produce and avoided processed food, brexit would not affect the shopping bill.
Online shopping can use the EU mainland instead of the UK. I use amazon.de instead of amazon.co.uk (see my post in 'minor consequences of brexit), and you don't need to speak german. Unfortunately, search engines seem to automatically locate suppliers in the UK if they are not available in Ireland. I'm not an expert but maybe you can change the google settings?
Both the government and businesses need to spend less time trying to preserve UK trade and more time trying to find new markets in Europe. Direct shipping needs to be developed so more exporters and importers use it and therefore bring the shipping costs down.
I appreciate it will not be an option for some businesses (producers of perishable goods, like mushrooms, will be hit hard), but the vast majority of irish businesses can get round brexit - literally.
The only way for Ireland to cope with brexit is for them to move forward with Europe and let the UK rot in its no-deal utopia.
While Ireland lingers and rots in a decaying Euro zone.
 

Surkov

Well-known member
Joined
May 31, 2016
Messages
4,600
There has been virtually no discussion of the ROI's preparedness for a clean Brexit... now almost a certainty and mere weeks away.

Although RTE is starting to break from the 'nothing to worry about' narrative and is starting to ask hard questions...
 

Lumpy Talbot

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Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
27,650
Twitter
No
Preparations for Brexit, as the British media have pointed out in their dissatisfaction with their own preparations, have been ongoing in Dublin since 2016.

Half the irritation around Europe with the UK is precisely because the internal chaos at Westminster doesn't allow anyone to prepare for Brexit.

After three years Westminster has delayed departure once, and is still by no means in any way prepared for any economic shock tied to Brexit.

If Westminster is 'prepared' then I'd hate to see what real indecisiveness looks like. How much money and wasted resource, parliamentary time, resources within UK business has been wasted already with the UK about as prepared for Brexit now as it was three years ago.

IE 'not at all'.

Apparently someone with a magic wand is going to arrive- Merlin alongside Arthur perhaps, and make it all work.
 


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