Irish scientific research successes.

Wascurito

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Wascurito

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"In 2016 Ireland achieved a world ranking of 10th for the overall quality of its scientific research. It was the first time that Ireland had entered the top 10 in the world rankings and represents a jump of 26 places in just 13 years.
[...]
According to Science Foundation Ireland’s most recent annual report, Ireland is second in the global scientific ranking for its animal and dairy science. The country scores second too in immunology and in nanotechnology. It is third in materials sciences, fourth in agricultural sciences and fifth in chemistry. For basic medical research and computer science, Ireland came sixth.
"

Irish Times: Ireland enters top 10 for quality research
 

Wascurito

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"A project that led to the discovery of a potential new antibiotic capable of beating antimicrobial resistant bacteria including MRSA has won the overall prize at this year’s BT Young Scientist and Technology Exhibition.

The study by 15-year-old Simon Meehan from Coláiste Choilm in Ballincollig in Cork investigated the antimicrobial effect of parts of selected plants against the common bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (SA).

"
https://www.rte.ie/news/2018/0112/932959-bt-young-scientist/

"The overall runner-up group prize was collected by 16-year-olds, Darragh Twomey, Andrew Heffernan and Neil O’Leary from Coláiste Treasa in Kanturk in Cork.

They discovered that the common natural bacteria found in plants, Pseudomonas Fluorescens, could be used to markedly increase the yield of certain barley crops.
"
 

firefly123

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"A project that led to the discovery of a potential new antibiotic capable of beating antimicrobial resistant bacteria including MRSA has won the overall prize at this year’s BT Young Scientist and Technology Exhibition.

The study by 15-year-old Simon Meehan from Coláiste Choilm in Ballincollig in Cork investigated the antimicrobial effect of parts of selected plants against the common bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (SA).

"
https://www.rte.ie/news/2018/0112/932959-bt-young-scientist/

"The overall runner-up group prize was collected by 16-year-olds, Darragh Twomey, Andrew Heffernan and Neil O’Leary from Coláiste Treasa in Kanturk in Cork.

They discovered that the common natural bacteria found in plants, Pseudomonas Fluorescens, could be used to markedly increase the yield of certain barley crops.
"
A strange mix of pride at the skills of these children and shame that someone well over half my age is capable of such things.

Well done all. I'm off to give myself a good talking to whilst placing unreasonable demands on my children as I live my life vicariously through them.
 

cricket

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The young scientist exhibition is an inspiring event, great credit due to all involved.
 

Ardillaun

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Sounds like it could be big news. This is the scientific article discussed in the report:

Growing old, yet staying young: The role of telomeres in bats

It has been known since Aristotle that bigger animal species tend to live longer than smaller ones. (This doesn’t apply so well within species as we can see when humans got their hands on dogs.) They also have slower metabolic rates and heart rates.

Body size, energy metabolism and lifespan | Journal of Experimental Biology

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kleiber's_law

There are some curious exceptions to this rule. Certain types of bats of the genus Myotis live way longer than their small size and high metabolic rate would predict, longer even than humans when their size is considered, and they also show little evidence of growing old before they die. An individual bat of this type has lived to the incredible age of 41 when similar sized mammals usually manage about 4 years. One key cause of old age is the shortening of telomeres, the ends of chromosomes, after each cell division. This shortening eventually triggers cell repair mechanisms and the grim process of ageing begins to roll. A natural enzyme, telomerase, can counter this process by lengthening telomeres but it has the unwelcome side effect of causing cancer. Prof. Teeling’s group, in collaboration with several other European groups, has found that some bats may maintain telomere length by turning on two other genes, ATM and SETX. This finding should lead to a better understanding of ageing and may eventually help scientists slow down the ageing process itself. Here is Prof. Teeling doing a TED talk on bats:

https://www.ted.com/talks/emma_teeling_the_secret_of_the_bat_genome/up-next#t-116437

Out for a bit of swimming:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Mz8dVfVqSS8

And, given that we are talking about genetics, I think we can mention her da:

https://www.independent.ie/business/irish/irelands-top-whiskey-magnate-is-looking-for-diamonds-in-the-rough-30301076.html
 
Last edited:

Morgellons

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[video=youtube;eirq4laOhcU]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eirq4laOhcU[/video]
 

Karloff

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Sounds like it could be big news. This is the scientific article discussed in the report:

Growing old, yet staying young: The role of telomeres in bats

It has been known since Aristotle that bigger animal species tend to live longer than smaller ones. (This doesn’t apply so well within species as we can see when humans got their hands on dogs.) They also have slower metabolic rates and heart rates.

Body size, energy metabolism and lifespan | Journal of Experimental Biology

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kleiber's_law

There are some curious exceptions to this rule. Certain types of bats of the genus Myotis live way longer than their small size and high metabolic rate would predict, longer even than humans when their size is considered, and they also show little evidence of growing old before they die. An individual bat of this type has lived to the incredible age of 41 when similar sized mammals usually manage about 4 years. One key cause of old age is the shortening of telomeres, the ends of chromosomes, after each cell division. This shortening eventually triggers cell repair mechanisms and the grim process of ageing begins to roll. A natural enzyme, telomerase, can counter this process by lengthening telomeres but it has the unwelcome side effect of causing cancer. Prof. Teeling’s group, in collaboration with several other European groups, has found that some bats may maintain telomere length by turning on two other genes, ATM and SETX. This finding should lead to a better understanding of ageing and may eventually help scientists slow down the ageing process itself. Here is Prof. Teeling doing a TED talk on bats:

https://www.ted.com/talks/emma_teeling_the_secret_of_the_bat_genome/up-next#t-116437

Out for a bit of swimming:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Mz8dVfVqSS8

And, given that we are talking about genetics, I think we can mention her da:

https://www.independent.ie/business/irish/irelands-top-whiskey-magnate-is-looking-for-diamonds-in-the-rough-30301076.html
Longevity research is not good news, it's hard to think of a more dangerous science with little benefits.
 

GDPR

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Longevity research is not good news, it's hard to think of a more dangerous science with little benefits.
How so?

The last time you commented on health matters, you claimed Irish people would be better off on a diet of quinoa, blueberries and avocados.

Which doesnt exactly fit with your anti-globalisation stance.
 

Karloff

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How so?

The last time you commented on health matters, you claimed Irish people would be better off on a diet of quinoa, blueberries and avocados.

Which doesnt exactly fit with your anti-globalisation stance.
Uh, the international trade in goods unavailable from a domestic source is NOT globalisation. If it were then globalisation has been in operation for thousands of years.

And those foods ARE good for you.
 

stopdoingstuff

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Uh, the international trade in goods unavailable from a domestic source is NOT globalisation. If it were then globalisation has been in operation for thousands of years.

And those foods ARE good for you.
Steak is better.
 

onetimeonly

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Uh, the international trade in goods unavailable from a domestic source is NOT globalisation. If it were then globalisation has been in operation for thousands of years.

And those foods ARE good for you.
In what way? Do they make you healthier? And live longer?
 


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