Irish scientific research successes.

GDPR

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Uh, the international trade in goods unavailable from a domestic source is NOT globalisation. If it were then globalisation has been in operation for thousands of years.

And those foods ARE good for you.
Sure you shouldnt be on Mumsnet?
 


Ardillaun

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Longevity research is not good news, it's hard to think of a more dangerous science with little benefits.
I'd say there are a fair few individual humans out there who would see considerable benefit in living a longer and healthier life. Eliminating cancer wouldn't be a bad idea, would it? We'd have to keep a careful eye on population growth but we need to do that anyway. Rest assured that if such tablets ever become available you won't be forced to take them.
 
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Karloff

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I'd say there are a fair few individual humans out there who would see considerable benefit in living a longer and healthier life. Eliminating cancer wouldn't be a bad idea, would it? We'd have to keep a careful eye on population growth but we need to do that anyway. Rest assured that if such tablets ever become available you won't be forced to take them.
Longevity and life expectancy are different areas in the scientific sense.

We have an overpopulation problem. Longevity research will be for the likes of Rupert Murdoch and the Koch brothers.
 

Ardillaun

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Imagine if you could be fresh-faced at a hundred, swinging your hurley and shinning up trees before keeling over at 101. There might be problems but they would be good ones to have. Although suffering may draw us apart from worldly cares it’s generally overrated as a spiritual aid.
 
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Karloff

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Imagine if you could be fresh-faced at a hundred, swinging your hurley and shinning up trees before keeling over at 101. There might be problems but they would be good ones to have. Although suffering may draw us apart from worldly cares it’s generally overrated as a spiritual aid.
Thinking primarily as individuals - this is why the planet is being destroyed. We need to start thinking as one of a collective - more the way bees do but retaining the best of individuality (our ingenuity, our compassion, our questioning of authority) not the worst (greed, short termist view.)
 

Ardillaun

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Thinking primarily as individuals - this is why the planet is being destroyed. We need to start thinking as one of a collective - more the way bees do but retaining the best of individuality (our ingenuity, our compassion, our questioning of authority) not the worst (greed, short termist view.)
We can do both. In the meantime, saying goodbye to cancer and senility remains a worthwhile research goal.
 
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Wascurito

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I'm trying to get my head around this. Is each "bit" represented by one of the 4 DNA bases (cytosine (C), thymine (T), adenine (A), guanine (G)) instead of a 1 or 0?

The technique needs work wrt response times but looks very interesting and I love how they used that staple of all beginner programmers ("Hello world") in their test.

RTÉ News: Waterford researchers develop new method to store data in DNA
 

Deadlock

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I'm trying to get my head around this. Is each "bit" represented by one of the 4 DNA bases (cytosine (C), thymine (T), adenine (A), guanine (G)) instead of a 1 or 0?

The technique needs work wrt response times but looks very interesting and I love how they used that staple of all beginner programmers ("Hello world") in their test.

RTÉ News: Waterford researchers develop new method to store data in DNA
The article doesn't say. What maybe possible is that triplet combinations of ACGT, called codons, which specify particular amino acids (many of which already are referred to with letters as a short hand) are used. So combinations of three bases may be used to directly encode individual letters. From the article the "HELL" of "HELLO" can already be spelled out by the base combinations CAC GAA TTA TTA. The so called triplet doesn't encode an O so some other combination already used multiply elsewhere maybe used instead.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_code
 
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clearmurk

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I'm trying to get my head around this. Is each "bit" represented by one of the 4 DNA bases (cytosine (C), thymine (T), adenine (A), guanine (G)) instead of a 1 or 0?

The technique needs work wrt response times but looks very interesting and I love how they used that staple of all beginner programmers ("Hello world") in their test.

RTÉ News: Waterford researchers develop new method to store data in DNA
Is this another piece of innovation that has effectively been imported?
 

Wascurito

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The article doesn't say. What maybe possible is that triplet combinations of ACGT, called codons, which specify particular amino acids (many of which already are referred to with letters as a short hand) are used. So combinations of three bases may be used to directly encode individual letters. From the article the "HELL" of "HELLO" can already be spelled out by the base combinations CAC GAA TTA TTA. The so called triplet doesn't encode an O so some other combination already used multiply elsewhere maybe used instead.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_code
Interesting....but I wonder if that's the schema they used since it seems to be very restrictive. Even the ASCII system - which is heavily biased towards the Roman Alphabet uses 255 variations.
 

Deadlock

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Interesting....but I wonder if that's the schema they used since it seems to be very restrictive. Even the ASCII system - which is heavily biased towards the Roman Alphabet uses 255 variations.
We'll have to see when they publish. The triplet system is restrictive in that only 64 variations are possible (4^3). It does have the advantage that that is the code biology uses and reading systems based on biological systems can be piggy-backed on readily enough. If a quad code (4^4) was used, the 256 ASCII variations are possible, but with the loss of direct biological "comprehension"
 

Wascurito

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We'll have to see when they publish. The triplet system is restrictive in that only 64 variations are possible (4^3). It does have the advantage that that is the code biology uses and reading systems based on biological systems can be piggy-backed on readily enough. If a quad code (4^4) was used, the 256 ASCII variations are possible, but with the loss of direct biological "comprehension"
True. I've had a look around and can find no other articles about this. Normally, the IT and The Journal covers this stuff too thereby allowing us to glean extra detail. However, all we have so far is the RTÉ article.
 

Volatire

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Volatire is tired of over-hyped premature announcements from Irish Universities and ITs.

At various times, they have claimed to have found a cure for cancer, diabetes, alzheimers, stumbled on a unbreakable cryptographic algorithm, solved climate change and discovered Atlantis.

Even the ludicrous young scientists competition was won by a teenager who apparently discovered the cure for MRSA.

Sadly, most of this stuff is laughable. The predictable consequence of excessive funding and the need to be seen to "produce results".
 

Wascurito

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Volatire is tired [...]
So go and lie down for as long as it takes.

Meanwhile, the University of Wascurito is about to make a major announcement regarding a cure for Illeism.
 

Elvis jaffacake

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