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Irish Scientist Wins International Award


SirCharles

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Joined
Nov 8, 2009
Messages
15,730
Irish Scientist, Diana Beresford Kroeger, author of 'Arboretum America', and
'Global Forest', will be honoured with a fellowship from 'Wings Worldquest'
in New York on Thursday, the 15th April. This award is the science world's
equivalent of a Nobel Prize. Wings Worldquest celebrates extraordinary women
scientists.

Brought up in West Cork, now living in Canada, Ms Beresford-Kroeger
specialises in the study of ancient woodlands, "Trees are a livng miracle",
and they create the conditions for healthy eco-systems, which form "the
nerve system of biodiversity".

Two years ago on a trip home, Ms. Beresford-Kroeger, joined the Woodland
League, a not for profit NGO, as their consultant scientist, endorsing their
policy of protecting natural and ancient woodlands and promoting native
species.

She is deeply concerned about the fate of the Worlds remaining old-growth
forests because of over-harvesting and destruction of eco-systems caused by
industrial tree plantations. This forestry model, which dominates the Irish
landscape, is reliant on chemical pesticides and fertilisers.

Ms Beresford-Kroeger was also shocked to learn of the McCarthy Report's
proposal last year to privatise Coillte (the Irish Forestry Board) and it's
1.1 million acres of Irish forests, mountains and rivers.

Helvetia Wealth A.G., a Swiss based international investment company last
year appointed ex-Taoiseach, Bertie Ahern as their Chairman and have
expressed interest in acquiring Coillte and all it's assets.

"The Irish public forests are the inheritance of the Irish children and
grandchildren and must never be sold", she said.

Ms Beresford-Kroeger's new book 'The Global Forest', which promotes the
multiple benefits and gifts of native, natural forests, will be available
worldwide later this month. This book is a timely reminder to the world of
how much we depend on our ancient relationships with trees and nature.

LINKS:

Woodland League Woodland League - Restoring the relationship between people and their woodlands

Facebook: The Woodland League

Myspace: Where's my tree? (Woodland League) | MySpace
 

Nemesiscorporation

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Oct 2, 2011
Messages
14,214
I agree. The site is dumbed down.

Also members of FG, FF, Labour, SF, SWP, SDLP, DUP, UUP, Alliance, etc all tend to be full of people who are reactionary towards science. This board is full of people from those parties.
 

APettigrew92

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Aug 4, 2011
Messages
2,684
I agree. The site is dumbed down.

Also members of FG, FF, Labour, SF, SWP, SDLP, DUP, UUP, Alliance, etc all tend to be full of people who are reactionary towards science. This board is full of people from those parties.
That's because if Darwinian science had its way, the majority of FF supporters would've been bred out of the foodchain centuries ago.
 

Carlos Danger

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I'd have thought that "the science world's equivalent of a Nobel Prize" would've been an actual Nobel Prize.
 

gatsbygirl20

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Joined
Dec 1, 2008
Messages
22,790
Great to see an Irish student winning this award

The Young Scientist has been a very successful initiative in Irish schools, drawing on the best from students and teachers. The teachers and students give freely of their time, working for the love of their subject, often spending Christmas or the early New Year finishing their projects for the competition in January

It is good to see all of this bearing fruit.

I am no scientist, but some of my past pupils have been less than enthusiastic about the employment prospects and salaries of Science graduates. They claim that the work and study required --with late evening Labs, etc--is intense, like studying Medicine.

But unlike Medicine, Science does not lead automatically to a well-paid career. Low pay or years doing research, or emigration to yet more low-paid work, seem to be the fate of many.
One of my past-pupils who emigrated to London, moved out of the area of Science altogether. He said to me: "If I had my time over again, I'd do Arts. I know it leads to nothing career-wise but at least I'd have had some fun, with few lectures and lots of free time. Instead I slogged for a serious degree for 4 years, paid a lot for a Masters and ended up in London on short contracts earning less than TEFL teachers who at least could travel the world with their certificate which they obtained after one months training"

But none of this takes away from the great success of the Irish student from St Paul's school in Raheny, who won't have any trouble finding work, one presumes. Congratulations to him
 

wombat

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Jun 16, 2007
Messages
31,940
But unlike Medicine, Science does not lead automatically to a well-paid career. Low pay or years doing research, or emigration to yet more low-paid work, seem to be the fate of many.
You are comparing apples and oranges, a doctor is qualified to practice medicine, a science graduate has no specific training and is only qualified for entry level positions in industry. However, many who take the industrial route have well paid careers and those who are good can do exceptionally well.
 

tommy2bad

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Messages
232
Twitter
@rathmacan
I'd have thought that "the science world's equivalent of a Nobel Prize" would've been an actual Nobel Prize.
This seems to be the women's event of science prizes. I know theirs an effort being made to encourage more women into the sciences but this kind of special women's only thing makes me a bit uncomfortable. It's not like their a scarcity of really great scientists that were and are women.
Also it seems a bit tree huggery, Wings Worldquest I mean not special stuff for women. Oh look a lady scientist top trumps set!!
Trading Cards
 

wombat

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Jun 16, 2007
Messages
31,940
It's a sign of how DUMBED DOWN this site is that in 4.5 years, this thread has received no replies.
In fairness, its a pretty obscure subject.
 

gatsbygirl20

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Joined
Dec 1, 2008
Messages
22,790
You are comparing apples and oranges, a doctor is qualified to practice medicine, a science graduate has no specific training and is only qualified for entry level positions in industry. However, many who take the industrial route have well paid careers and those who are good can do exceptionally well.
Yes, I suppose there is a difference, but I think the students doing Science felt in some way that they were doing something "practical" unlike say, the Arts graduate studying Film or Philosophy....They expected to
have better employment prospects, or better pay.






























































I know that "those who are good can do exceptionally wel

But that applies in nearly every field, however impractical the subject. Those with First Class Honours and First Class Masters will be cherry-picked, naturally. Everyone wants them.
It is the vast swathes of "ordinary" average students pouring out of Universities and ITs (the majority) that one worries about--whether it is with a qualification in Science or in some other field

EDIT: Jesus, Sorry about this. Don't seem to be able to edit the problem away.
 
L

lochlannach

I agree. The site is dumbed down.

Also members of FG, FF, Labour, SF, SWP, SDLP, DUP, UUP, Alliance, etc all tend to be full of people who are reactionary towards science. This board is full of people from those parties.
They don't understand the sciences. They pay lip service to them but don't really get them.

I think it's a global problem. How many scientists go on to have a career in politics? The politicians are the spawn of the business schools where they learn presentation skills and all the buzzwords.
 

Carlos Danger

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Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
28,486
Website
www.youtube.com
Yes, I suppose there is a difference, but I think the students doing Science felt in some way that they were doing something "practical" unlike say, the Arts graduate studying Film or Philosophy....They expected to
have better employment prospects, or better pay.






























































I know that "those who are good can do exceptionally wel

But that applies in nearly every field, however impractical the subject. Those with First Class Honours and First Class Masters will be cherry-picked, naturally. Everyone wants them.
It is the vast swathes of "ordinary" average students pouring out of Universities and ITs (the majority) that one worries about--whether it is with a qualification in Science or in some other field

EDIT: Jesus, Sorry about this. Don't seem to be able to edit the problem away.
That'll be two Our Fathers, four Hail Marys and a Glory Be.
 
L

lochlannach

Great to see an Irish student winning this award

The Young Scientist has been a very successful initiative in Irish schools, drawing on the best from students and teachers. The teachers and students give freely of their time, working for the love of their subject, often spending Christmas or the early New Year finishing their projects for the competition in January

It is good to see all of this bearing fruit.

I am no scientist, but some of my past pupils have been less than enthusiastic about the employment prospects and salaries of Science graduates. They claim that the work and study required --with late evening Labs, etc--is intense, like studying Medicine.

But unlike Medicine, Science does not lead automatically to a well-paid career. Low pay or years doing research, or emigration to yet more low-paid work, seem to be the fate of many.
One of my past-pupils who emigrated to London, moved out of the area of Science altogether. He said to me: "If I had my time over again, I'd do Arts. I know it leads to nothing career-wise but at least I'd have had some fun, with few lectures and lots of free time. Instead I slogged for a serious degree for 4 years, paid a lot for a Masters and ended up in London on short contracts earning less than TEFL teachers who at least could travel the world with their certificate which they obtained after one months training"

But none of this takes away from the great success of the Irish student from St Paul's school in Raheny, who won't have any trouble finding work, one presumes. Congratulations to him
Thanks for replying but it's actually 4 Irish scientists: the three girls from Kinsale and the guy from Raheny.

I'd love to see a situation emerge whereby successful Irish scientists were celebrated as much as successful sportspeople and celebrities. That way, they become heroes for the next generation of Irish students. It would be a huge boost to the much vaunted "knowledge economy".
 

wombat

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Joined
Jun 16, 2007
Messages
31,940
Thanks for replying but it's actually 4 Irish scientists: the three girls from Kinsale and the guy from Raheny.

I'd love to see a situation emerge whereby successful Irish scientists were celebrated as much as successful sportspeople and celebrities. That way, they become heroes for the next generation of Irish students. It would be a huge boost to the much vaunted "knowledge economy".
The practical problem is that while most reporters have an interest in sport, few have any interest in science. Those of us old enough will remember the space program/ race for the moon and the excitement it generated. Kids wanted to be pilots and travel into space and work in technology because it was exciting. Interestingly, becoming incredibly rich wasn't a huge motivation. I must admit, I cringe when I hear calls for schools to teach kids to be entrepeneurs (?), I still like the idea of encouraging curiosity for its own sake.
 

devnull

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Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Messages
1,843
After a bit of research, I still don't see why I should care about the prize in the first OP. As others have pointed out, the science world already has a perfectly good equivalent of the Nobel Prize. No disrespect is intended to the awardee - I reckon she brought more prestige to the award than it did to her.

The two awards given to the Young Scientist winners that you mention do both seem to be of significance, though.
The European Union's Young Scientist award generally has 3 winners from across Europe every year and Irish people have been among the winners for 6 years out of the last 8. We must be doing something right.
 
L

lochlannach

After a bit of research, I still don't see why I should care about the prize in the first OP. As others have pointed out, the science world already has a perfectly good equivalent of the Nobel Prize. No disrespect is intended to the awardee - I reckon she brought more prestige to the award than it did to her.

The two awards given to the Young Scientist winners that you mention do both seem to be of significance, though.
The European Union's Young Scientist award generally has 3 winners from across Europe every year and Irish people have been among the winners for 6 years out of the last 8. We must be doing something right.
Fair enough re the OP. But scientists aren't celebrated enough in this country - or anywhere, really.

This matters. If science was given more respect, we wouldn't be seeing this resurgence in creationism in the USA or the general scepticism about climate change.
 

gatsbygirl20

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 1, 2008
Messages
22,790
That'll be two Our Fathers, four Hail Marys and a Glory Be.
:oops::oops:....Um....doesn't look like I'll be getting the top prize anytime soon for Wizard Tech Brain Of Nano-Science And Computer-y Stuff

Ah well, some of us are happy in our own simple way...
 
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