Irish-UK Joint Sovereignty of Northern Ireland. How would it work?

ruserious

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With the apparent failure of power sharing in Northern Ireland, we may end up going back to the drawing board on how to govern the North.

One of the many talking points to come out of yesterday's events, was the potential for Joint Sovereignty to be introduced as a solution to political instabilities in the North.

But how would this potential solution work?

The awkward issue of citizenship under such an arrangement is uniquely negated in NI as the right to hold either passport in NI is already enshrined.

You may have joint authority where domestic policy is decided upon by both Dublin and London with NI regional councils continuing for local issues. London would maintain responsibility for foreign affairs and defence and thus sovereignty.
You could also have outright joint sovereignty where the former plus foreign affairs and defence policy would be shared between Ireland and the U.K.

It's a confusing and ill defined concept not strictly limited to the potential blueprints above.

Do you think it is a possibility? If so, how would it work?
 


Spanner Island

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It's all a great big clusterf*** of a mess.

Brexit is a total mess.

NI is a lamentable mess politically nearly 20 years after the GFA... although I did hear someone say at least 'Cash for Ash' isn't a sectarian issue... and therefore could be considered progress... :roll:

I haven't a clue how Joint Sovereignty could work at all... it sounds like a uniquely stupid concept that could only ever have been dreamt up for somewhere like NI and probably never envisaged to be actually implemented...
 

PBP voter

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Ireland would rule Mon,Tues,Weds. The Brits could have Thur,Fri,Sat.

The Alliance party can have Sundays.
 

Rich OC

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It could work. One thing I have always thought is that joint authority should apply until such time as there is a "super-majority" one way or the other, 80% was what I thought it should be. In return the Irish Government would have to pay additional funds, but on the plus side things like infrastructure could be thought about in an all Ireland basis for the first time in 95 years.

Might also help the border counties be looked at differently, Cavan, Monaghan and Leitrim are counties that are at the northern end of the middle of the Island, but their "border county" status means that they are seen as isolated "Northern" lands. This needs to change.
 

GDPR

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With the apparent failure of power sharing in Northern Ireland, we may end up going back to the drawing board on how to govern the North.

One of the many talking points to come out of yesterday's events, was the potential for Joint Sovereignty to be introduced as a solution to political instabilities in the North.

But how would this potential solution work?

The awkward issue of citizenship under such an arrangement is uniquely negated in NI as the right to hold either passport in NI is already enshrined.

You may have joint authority where domestic policy is decided upon by both Dublin and London with NI regional councils continuing for local issues. London would maintain responsibility for foreign affairs and defence and thus sovereignty.
You could also have outright joint sovereignty where the former plus foreign affairs and defence policy would be shared between Ireland and the U.K.

It's a confusing and ill defined concept not strictly limited to the potential blueprints above.

Do you think it is a possibility? If so, how would it work?

In my day we called it
"condominium" - please, I have heard all the jokes :)

Essentially, Britain would cede to Ireland joint authority over Northern Ireland, which would be governed by a commission of representatives from Dublin, London and the Northern communities (and possibly the European Union).

Ni would remain in the EU.

Its basically what we have now: Britain has already conceded the principle of joint authority: under the Anglo-Irish Agreement Irish ministers were given the power to monitor any political, legal or security issues which concern the nationalist community in the North.

Elections would still take place to the Joint Authority of NI members. so the democratic principle would be honoured.
 

ruserious

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It seems to be the fairest of outcomes for all concerned in NI.
 

gleeful

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No way the current Tory government would agree to it. They are more likely to want to annex the Republic.
 

Dimples 77

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With the apparent failure of power sharing in Northern Ireland, we may end up going back to the drawing board on how to govern the North.

One of the many talking points to come out of yesterday's events, was the potential for Joint Sovereignty to be introduced as a solution to political instabilities in the North.

But how would this potential solution work?

The awkward issue of citizenship under such an arrangement is uniquely negated in NI as the right to hold either passport in NI is already enshrined.

You may have joint authority where domestic policy is decided upon by both Dublin and London with NI regional councils continuing for local issues. London would maintain responsibility for foreign affairs and defence and thus sovereignty.
You could also have outright joint sovereignty where the former plus foreign affairs and defence policy would be shared between Ireland and the U.K.

It's a confusing and ill defined concept not strictly limited to the potential blueprints above.

Do you think it is a possibility? If so, how would it work?

Shared defence policy?

You have got to be kidding.

The ROI couldn't defend itself, never mind defending Northern Ireland.

A what foreign affairs policy would be required for Northern Ireland?
 

ruserious

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Shared defence policy?

You have got to be kidding.

The ROI couldn't defend itself, never mind defending Northern Ireland.

A what foreign affairs policy would be required for Northern Ireland?
What part of "confusing concept" and "not a strict blueprint" didn't you understand. The OP is simply a vehicle to invite discussion.
 

redneck

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this is not a bad idea. But I think that the Republic should join Nato if it is to work properly. UK and US must not have to bear all the burden of defending Europe.
Also could the Republic produce a Taoiseach or Minister up to the job of defending the Nationalists in the North? Assuming the British will defend the Unionists.
 

pinemartin

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this is not a bad idea. But I think that the Republic should join Nato if it is to work properly. UK and US must not have to bear all the burden of defending Europe.
Also could the Republic produce a Taoiseach or Minister up to the job of defending the Nationalists in the North? Assuming the British will defend the Unionists.
If we joined NATO we would have to spend lots on military gear, that will not happen, the government has very little interest in increasing defense spending.
 

vivabrigada

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Just Jack

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No way the current Tory government would agree to it. They are more likely to want to annex the Republic.
Stop.

The Blueshirts and the Stickies/Lab are getting practically moist with excitement. :cry:
 

Ireniall

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It seems to be the fairest of outcomes for all concerned in NI.
It's fair for all concerned in NI but in what way does it do anything for the south except get us further involved-this time at the more serious responsibility end-in a sticky situation in which our interests would be essentially the same as the UK (keep the train on the rails) but we'd be much more likely to be dragged into lining up behind Nationalist issues and simply be an extra party who had a veto over decisions which would do little for the running of the place. It does little for the traditional Nationalist wish for a United Ireland either and might prove an all too permanent stalemate. I love it when Charlie Flanagan gets to tut-tut over the shenanigans north of the border. Every time he does it, it reminds me of how lucky we are that the Brits have the primary responsibility up there not us. Never mind joint authority and all the rest of those pointless half measures. We want a united Ireland if it can be got -otherwise lets hold onto the one advantage that partition has given us.
 


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