Irish Uni Degree World's best value

gleeful

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2016
Messages
7,520
The Economist has crunched the numbers and found that the net benefit (ie. after fees, extra tax, etc) of getting a university degree from Ireland is the best value in the world. The average degree holder earns an extra €350,000 over their life time after tax when compared with a non-degree holder.

An Irish degree gets you more bang for your buck than anywhere else

Second to Ireland is the US, Sweden, Denmark and Greece are at the bottom of the pile (presumably due to higher tax rates in Denmark, and the fact that everyone in Sweden does equality studies degrees).
 


PBP voter

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 18, 2015
Messages
9,239
Second to Ireland is the US. Sweden, Denmark and Greece are at the bottom of the pile (presumably due to higher tax rates in Denmark, and the fact that everyone in Sweden does equality studies degrees).
Should their be a full stop after US?
 

PBP voter

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 18, 2015
Messages
9,239
Sweden needs to fix it's education system ASAP.

It's falling apart.

They are clueless when it comes to integrating foreigners in education. Unlike us and the UK.

They want to ghettoize foreigners by turning them into welfare junkies.

While first- and second-generation immigrants in England and many other countries perform above the national average, in Sweden they have been blamed for dragging standards down. In March this year, Anna Ekström, the director of the government-run Swedish National Agency for Education, claimed that immigration was “not an insignificant” factor in declining attainment. The proportion of students from immigrant families rose from 11 to 15 per cent between 2000 and 2012 and has increased sharply since the beginning of the migration crisis.

Perhaps most galling for Swedes is how schools appear to be increasing inequality, rather than eroding it. “We need to put our focus on building equality into the system,” Gustav Fridolin, Sweden’s education minister, said recently. The voucher system has created more opportunities for middle-class parents to ensure that their children attend the best institutions. The OECD report called on Sweden to “revise school-choice arrangements to ensure quality with equity” and “improve the access of disadvantaged families to information about schools”.

Why Sweden
 

Mercurial

Moderator
Joined
Jun 4, 2009
Messages
86,861
The Economist has crunched the numbers and found that the net benefit (ie. after fees, extra tax, etc) of getting a university degree from Ireland is the best value in the world. The average degree holder earns an extra €350,000 over their life time after tax when compared with a non-degree holder.

An Irish degree gets you more bang for your buck than anywhere else

Second to Ireland is the US, Sweden, Denmark and Greece are at the bottom of the pile (presumably due to higher tax rates in Denmark, and the fact that everyone in Sweden does equality studies degrees).
That's not necessarily a good thing - it just means that there are very large inequalities between people with degrees and people without.

It may well be better if there was less of a gap, with other professions (which often require just as much hard work as anything requiring a degree) could pay more than they do at present.
 

PBP voter

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 18, 2015
Messages
9,239
That's not necessarily a good thing - it just means that there are very large inequalities between people with degrees and people without.

It may well be better if there was less of a gap, with other professions (which often require just as much hard work as anything requiring a degree) could pay more than they do at present.
Funnily enough a Sinn feiner supporter was on here a while back was gloating at how he was paid more that his neighbours who went to University. He claimed he was a tradesman.



Only if you want to stay in Ireland and live and work within 15 minutes of where you were brought up.

I served an apprencticeship.. did time abroad.. have a good job where I work.. get paid well.

But still have to look at college and University graduates look down their noses at me at the lads because we still wear overalls to work ..

Still, the extra 25-30k a year more we make than them more than make up for it :)
http://www.politics.ie/forum/education-science/249968-does-university-still-pay-off-most-irish-graduates-apprenticeships-better.html
 

gleeful

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2016
Messages
7,520
That's not necessarily a good thing - it just means that there are very large inequalities between people with degrees and people without.

It may well be better if there was less of a gap, with other professions (which often require just as much hard work as anything requiring a degree) could pay more than they do at present.
To be honest, it probably just also shows how many people have degrees in Ireland. We have higher rates than most countries - meaning most motivated people go get themselves a degree. Those people would be doing well regardless.
 

silverharp

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 21, 2015
Messages
16,267
That's not necessarily a good thing - it just means that there are very large inequalities between people with degrees and people without.

It may well be better if there was less of a gap, with other professions (which often require just as much hard work as anything requiring a degree) could pay more than they do at present.
there is a market, people get paid relative to the value they add and supply of the particular skill unless they work for something which is government funded so may not be the case.
 

Mercurial

Moderator
Joined
Jun 4, 2009
Messages
86,861
To be honest, it probably just also shows how many people have degrees in Ireland. We have higher rates than most countries - meaning most motivated people go get themselves a degree. Those people would be doing well regardless.
That's a good point - if getting a degree is the "default" then it makes sense that those who don't would tend to be quite a bit worse off, on average.
 

Mercurial

Moderator
Joined
Jun 4, 2009
Messages
86,861
there is a market, people get paid relative to the value they add and supply of the particular skill unless they work for something which is government funded so may not be the case.
At most, they get paid according to the perceived value they add. If degrees are valued too highly (or non-degree-based professions aren't valued enough) then that would affect earnings.
 

mr_anderson

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 12, 2007
Messages
9,708
This cannot be true.
I was reliably informed on another thread that Cuba had the greatest education system the world has ever known.
 

Roll_On

Well-known member
Joined
May 27, 2010
Messages
17,544
I'd say Ireland certainly has one of the fairer systems in the world. You can get a high standard education easily enough no matter what your background. Problem areas remain, i.e. medicine and law which are closed shops for the aspiring working classes. This needs to be tackled both in the name of equality and to tackle cronyism in these professions.
 

greengoose2

Well-known member
Joined
May 30, 2009
Messages
24,897
To be honest, it probably just also shows how many people have degrees in Ireland. We have higher rates than most countries - meaning most motivated people go get themselves a degree. Those people would be doing well regardless.
That is an assumption.Life is not merely about making money.Nor is it about swallowing and regurgitating what one might "learn" in college.Sadly the proof is out there that we are a nation of educated idiots. The smart ones emigrate.
 

Watcher2

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2010
Messages
34,306
The Economist has crunched the numbers and found that the net benefit (ie. after fees, extra tax, etc) of getting a university degree from Ireland is the best value in the world. The average degree holder earns an extra €350,000 over their life time after tax when compared with a non-degree holder.

An Irish degree gets you more bang for your buck than anywhere else

Second to Ireland is the US, Sweden, Denmark and Greece are at the bottom of the pile (presumably due to higher tax rates in Denmark, and the fact that everyone in Sweden does equality studies degrees).
OK, queue restart of third level fees introduction (despite the fact that there is a fee of €3,500 charged currently).

But taking the figures posted, over a career of 43 years (graduate at 25 and retire at 68), the benefit of a degree over someone who only studied to leaving cert level, is €7,400 per year averaged over a career.

Doesn't sound so hot now, does it?
 

mr_anderson

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 12, 2007
Messages
9,708
I'd say Ireland certainly has one of the fairer systems in the world. You can get a high standard education easily enough no matter what your background. Problem areas remain, i.e. medicine and law which are closed shops for the aspiring working classes. This needs to be tackled both in the name of equality and to tackle cronyism in these professions.
Medicine has always been the most expensive degree.
My idea has been to double or triple the places for medicine, but to charge people €250k tuition fees (in order to pay the extra cost), but allow this to be paid off through their income tax.
It reverts to a normal loan if they decide to work abroad.
We could easily have 2 or 3 times the amount of doctors working here.
 

fat finger

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 22, 2016
Messages
2,175
The Economist has crunched the numbers and found that the net benefit (ie. after fees, extra tax, etc) of getting a university degree from Ireland is the best value in the world. The average degree holder earns an extra €350,000 over their life time after tax when compared with a non-degree holder.

...

Second to Ireland is the US, Sweden, Denmark and Greece are at the bottom of the pile (presumably due to higher tax rates in Denmark, and the fact that everyone in Sweden does equality studies degrees).

Yep, Ireland being warmed up for the student loans scam that has ravaged UK and America.
Money-lending hints and tips: Tip #1: First you flatter 'em, then you gouge 'em! Works every time!
 

silverharp

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 21, 2015
Messages
16,267
At most, they get paid according to the perceived value they add. If degrees are valued too highly (or non-degree-based professions aren't valued enough) then that would affect earnings.
it still comes back to supply and demand. they could create a needless barrier to entry especially in lower paid jobs and an opportunity cost for the economy in terms of needless expense for a dubious raise in standards. It's clear a medical degree for a doctor is required, a degree in childcare could be seen as "education inflation" and is just there to feed the educational industrial complex. Likewise if there are too many Journalism degree courses for example that are probably way out of line with the demand for them and you have simply taken money off gullible students and wasted their time when all that was needed was a media organisation taking on apprentices with maybe providing some evening studies
 

gleeful

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2016
Messages
7,520
Medicine has always been the most expensive degree.
My idea has been to double or triple the places for medicine, but to charge people €250k tuition fees for medicine (in order to pay the extra cost), but allow this to be paid off through their income tax.
It reverts to a normal loan if they decide to work abroad.
We could easily have 2 or 3 times the amount of doctors working here.
For medicine the obvious solution is to have high fees, but have a large number of tied scholarships funded by the HSE. They pay your fees on condition of a 10 year employment contract. The Irish navy does this already for some engineering courses.
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top