Is delayed Dublin MRI scan "rationing by queue"?

Patslatt1

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An acquaintance who has undiagnosed cardiovascular health problems was given a date for a Dublin MRI scan-several months into next year!!! Let's hope she is still alive by then.
In the past, such delays suggested scans were used as an indirect form of "rationing by queue",a phrase commonly used about the UK's NHS, national health service. Years ago,I read that MRI machines were sitting idle in some hospitals and maybe they are still idle.
MRI scans have been around for decades, so they should no longer be a scarce novelty to be rationed by public hospitals and the HSE.
Maybe if the public health budget money followed the patient instead of being handed on a plate to public hospitals as a leading oncologist advocated, such prolonged waiting for tests wouldn't be so extreme.
 


james toney

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He is lucky, a teenager with Down syndrome was recently given a date for her MRI scan....2029.
It can't get any worse than that.......until you factor in Stephen Donnelly is now in charge, cheered on by Fine Gael.
 

Patslatt1

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He is lucky, a teenager with Down syndrome was recently given a date for her MRI scan....2029.
It can't get any worse than that.......until you factor in Stephen Donnelly is now in charge, cheered on by Fine Gael.
What's Donnelly's CV?
 

Patslatt1

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He is lucky, a teenager with Down syndrome was recently given a date for her MRI scan....2029.
It can't get any worse than that.......until you factor in Stephen Donnelly is now in charge, cheered on by Fine Gael.
2029, are you sure?
 

james toney

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2029, are you sure?
It's true... 2029 was the new date given by Crumlin hospital.
It was in the media recently, as the girls mother rightly kicked up a fuss....when that happens the minister and his spin unit move quickly to rearrange a new date, they can't have that bad PR,mother and daughter on radio and television,ect.
Then again...we haven't seen such a bad start from this coalition of chaos.
 

Massey

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Cannot get consultants to work in the public service anymore, recently a cardiologist position in a Dublin Hospital had no applicants, something unheard of 10 years ago.

The begrudgers have got their wish that consultants would lump it or leave it.
Well done.
 

bang bang

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He is lucky, a teenager with Down syndrome was recently given a date for her MRI scan....2029.
It can't get any worse than that.......until you factor in Stephen Donnelly is now in charge, cheered on by Fine Gael.
That has to be a mistake.
 

Massey

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Has to be done under anaesthetic - so probably not., - this is how bad it has become.
Minister kicked up a fuss, so patient was bumped up the list, all the others wait longer as a result.
 

redmonite

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An acquaintance who has undiagnosed cardiovascular health problems was given a date for a Dublin MRI scan-several months into next year!!! Let's hope she is still alive by then.
In the past, such delays suggested scans were used as an indirect form of "rationing by queue",a phrase commonly used about the UK's NHS, national health service. Years ago,I read that MRI machines were sitting idle in some hospitals and maybe they are still idle.
MRI scans have been around for decades, so they should no longer be a scarce novelty to be rationed by public hospitals and the HSE.
Maybe if the public health budget money followed the patient instead of being handed on a plate to public hospitals as a leading oncologist advocated, such prolonged waiting for tests wouldn't be so extreme.
No health system is perfect, but our system has to be the worst because all the incentives reward inactivity in the public system. For example, there are far more public consultant man hours in the health service than private ones, and as half the population has health insurance, waiting lists shouldn't be a problem.
 

james toney

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Patslatt1

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No health system is perfect, but our system has to be the worst because all the incentives reward inactivity in the public system. For example, there are far more public consultant man hours in the health service than private ones, and as half the population has health insurance, waiting lists shouldn't be a problem.
As the oncologist Senator advocated,the money should follow the patient. But the health care establishment naturally prefers that hospitals are handed their budgets on a platter.
 

galteeman

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On the Affidea website you can book an MRI scan for 260 euro cash within 7 days.
 

galteeman

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But somebody may be making a profit, and we can't have that!
Yeah and we can't have someone paying a few bob to sort a scan either when they can have a whinge instead.
 

MsDaisyC

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On the Affidea website you can book an MRI scan for 260 euro cash within 7 days.
That's not too bad. It cost me €200 about 10 years ago. I don't have health insurance because I can't afford it, and I know not everyone can easily put their hands on €260, but if it will take years off waiting for one, I'll make sure I can get it together as soon as I can. Once you have the scan and a subsequent diagnosis, it should speed things up. Also, you can see a private consultant (costly at around €200 per appt) and if they decide you need something done, you can ask them to refer you to a public hospital. I speak from experience!
 

omgsquared

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No health system is perfect, but our system has to be the worst because all the incentives reward inactivity in the public system. For example, there are far more public consultant man hours in the health service than private ones, and as half the population has health insurance, waiting lists shouldn't be a problem.
Probably true but how many of the same consultants are also doing pvt work>It is not in the interest sof consultants many of whom do both pvt and public work to have an efficient public service> The entire system needs overhaul and vested interests:consultants< nurses < support staff< the entire bureaucracy and their rep associations < as well as the entitled patients syndrome system gas to be tackled>> but first we must >>before we do anything else deal with the challenges of transgenderism
 

EU Insider

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That's not too bad. It cost me €200 about 10 years ago. I don't have health insurance because I can't afford it, and I know not everyone can easily put their hands on €260, but if it will take years off waiting for one, I'll make sure I can get it together as soon as I can. Once you have the scan and a subsequent diagnosis, it should speed things up. Also, you can see a private consultant (costly at around €200 per appt) and if they decide you need something done, you can ask them to refer you to a public hospital. I speak from experience!
Not all MRIs are equal, so a lot depends on the scanner and the reason the scan needed.

I would imagine at €260 a scan they're using the cheaper low-field MRI scanner, which can cost 20 times less than high-field scanners - which are what will typically be used in a hospital setting.

So, while low field might be acceptable for some circumstances, scanning legs and arms, they have far higher surface to noise ratio, lower contrast, and lower resolution to full body high-field scanners, as well as that private clinics may also not be able to perform more complex procedures or contrast imaging with low-field machines.
 


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