Is it now incumbent on the Irish Government to create a White Paper on Irish Unity?

ruserious

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No matter what side of the political debate you find yourself on with regards to Irish Unity; it is pretty obvious that the possibility of it happening are now more real than just a few short years ago.

Shifting demographics, Brexit and BBC Poll Results are just some of the reasons why Irish Unity has become a topical subject outside of traditional Northern Nationalist vox pop magazines.

A recent BBC poll found 42% of respondents would vote for unification.

Former First Minister of Northern Ireland, Peter Robinson, quite rightly came out to say that even if a border poll passed with the smallest of margins, there are no plans in place to bring it to a reality.
- He is quite right.

I think Varadkar visiting the Orange Museum is a good start. Unionists will be a cherished community within a United Ireland and it is a good thing to see the Irish government extend an olive branch.

But such public displays of friendship will not deliver a successful United Ireland.

For every reason above; I believe it is time that the Irish government start to recognise their role in securing a United Ireland as per the provisions of Bunreacht.
It is the firm will of the Irish Nation, in harmony and friendship, to unite all the people who share the territory of the island of Ireland, in all the diversity of their identities and traditions, recognising that a united Ireland shall be brought about only by peaceful means with the consent of a majority of the people, democratically expressed, in both jurisdictions in the island. - Article 3
As a United Ireland is coming closer to being brought about by democratic means, it is now incumbent on the Irish government to lay the ground work, as it were.

This may include setting up a Department or assigning a Minister for Unification.
At the very least, it should include a detailed and all encompassing white paper setting out how it will be delivered in the event of a Yes to unity vote.

Failure to take aforementioned steps under the present climate will render claims to be a "United Ireland party" spurious.


-rus.
 


cricket

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No matter what side of the political debate you find yourself on with regards to Irish Unity; it is pretty obvious that the possibility of it happening are now more real than just a few short years ago.

Shifting demographics, Brexit and BBC Poll Results are just some of the reasons why Irish Unity has become a topical subject outside of traditional Northern Nationalist vox pop magazines.

A recent BBC poll found 42% of respondents would vote for unification.

Former First Minister of Northern Ireland, Peter Robinson, quite rightly came out to say that even if a border poll passed with the smallest of margins, there are no plans in place to bring it to a reality.
- He is quite right.

I think Varadkar visiting the Orange Museum is a good start. Unionists will be a cherished community within a United Ireland and it is a good thing to see the Irish government extend an olive branch.

But such public displays of friendship will not deliver a successful United Ireland.

For every reason above; I believe it is time that the Irish government start to recognise their role in securing a United Ireland as per the provisions of Bunreacht.


As a United Ireland is coming closer to being brought about by democratic means, it is now incumbent on the Irish government to lay the ground work, as it were.

This may include setting up a Department or assigning a Minister for Unification.
At the very least, it should include a detailed and all encompassing white paper setting out how it will be delivered in the event of a Yes to unity vote.

Failure to take aforementioned steps under the present climate will render claims to be a "United Ireland party" spurious.


-rus.
No.
 

raetsel

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Leo Varadkar doesn't even want a referendum at the moment, so a White Paper is unlikely anytime soon.
 

statsman

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No matter what side of the political debate you find yourself on with regards to Irish Unity; it is pretty obvious that the possibility of it happening are now more real than just a few short years ago.

Shifting demographics, Brexit and BBC Poll Results are just some of the reasons why Irish Unity has become a topical subject outside of traditional Northern Nationalist vox pop magazines.

A recent BBC poll found 42% of respondents would vote for unification.

Former First Minister of Northern Ireland, Peter Robinson, quite rightly came out to say that even if a border poll passed with the smallest of margins, there are no plans in place to bring it to a reality.
- He is quite right.

I think Varadkar visiting the Orange Museum is a good start. Unionists will be a cherished community within a United Ireland and it is a good thing to see the Irish government extend an olive branch.

But such public displays of friendship will not deliver a successful United Ireland.

For every reason above; I believe it is time that the Irish government start to recognise their role in securing a United Ireland as per the provisions of Bunreacht.


As a United Ireland is coming closer to being brought about by democratic means, it is now incumbent on the Irish government to lay the ground work, as it were.

This may include setting up a Department or assigning a Minister for Unification.
At the very least, it should include a detailed and all encompassing white paper setting out how it will be delivered in the event of a Yes to unity vote.

Failure to take aforementioned steps under the present climate will render claims to be a "United Ireland party" spurious.


-rus.

There's a process agreed by the vast majority of the population by popular vote. Now that the UK government seem incapable of upholding the GFA it is incumbent on the Irish government to do exactly the opposite and defed the integrity of that agreement in any and all circumstances.

So, no.
 

ruserious

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There's a process agreed by the vast majority of the population by popular vote. Now that the UK government seem incapable of upholding the GFA it is incumbent on the Irish government to do exactly the opposite and defed the integrity of that agreement in any and all circumstances.

So, no.
Having a plan in place in the event of a border poll as laid down by the GFA does not breach the GFA. The White Paper I advocate would be how a United Ireland would work after such a border poll.
 

statsman

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Leo Varadkar doesn't even want a referendum at the moment, so a White Paper is unlikely anytime soon.
Nobody with any sense wants a border poll at the moment. First we have to see how Brexit shakes out and second it would probably fail.

Never interfere with your enemy when he's in the proces of making a mistake.
 

statsman

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Having a plan in place in the event of a border poll as laid down by the GFA does not breach the GFA. The White Paper I advocate would be how a United Ireland would work after such a border poll.

Both the letter and the spirit of the GFA is that the future of NI rests in the hands of the people of NI, without interference from outside. Any sugh plan would be seenm especially on the Unionist side, as gross interference.
 

GDPR

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There's a process agreed by the vast majority of the population by popular vote. Now that the UK government seem incapable of upholding the GFA it is incumbent on the Irish government to do exactly the opposite and defed the integrity of that agreement in any and all circumstances.

So, no.
Snap! Were Ireland to create a Dept for Reunification, it would be a meaningless provocation. There is the Council of Ireland, the GFA, multiple cross-border bodies and that is what must be sustained.
 

Northsideman

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There is not a snow balls chance of a border poll getting across the line, none whatsoever so WTF would the government stir it now?
 

statsman

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Snap! Were Ireland to create a Dept for Reunification, it would be a meaningless provocation. There is the Council of Ireland, the GFA, multiple cross-border bodies and that is what must be sustained.
It's so simple, even a Corkman should be able to understand it. ;)
 

Carlos Danger

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Having a plan in place in the event of a border poll as laid down by the GFA does not breach the GFA. The White Paper I advocate would be how a United Ireland would work after such a border poll.
We would first need to see how much money the U.K. will have left or available to it as credit to pay Ireland to take the North off its hands.

We will also need to see if they can honour the terms of whatever Brexit agreement is arrived at.
 

ruserious

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Both the letter and the spirit of the GFA is that the future of NI rests in the hands of the people of NI, without interference from outside. Any sugh plan would be seenm especially on the Unionist side, as gross interference.
The Oireachtas joint committee on implementing the GFA published a report on the aftermath of Irish Unity only last year:
https://data.oireachtas.ie/ie/oireachtas/committee/dail/32/joint_committee_on_the_implementation_of_the_good_friday_agreement/reports/2017/2017-08-02_brexit-and-the-future-of-ireland-uniting-ireland-and-its-people-in-peace-and-prosperity_en.pdf

Are you saying that the Irish committee charged with overseeing the GFA goes against the letter and spirit of the GFA?
 

statsman

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The Oireachtas joint committee on implementing the GFA published a report on the aftermath of Irish Unity only last year:
https://data.oireachtas.ie/ie/oireachtas/committee/dail/32/joint_committee_on_the_implementation_of_the_good_friday_agreement/reports/2017/2017-08-02_brexit-and-the-future-of-ireland-uniting-ireland-and-its-people-in-peace-and-prosperity_en.pdf

Are you saying that the Irish committee charged with overseeing the GFA goes against the letter and spirit of the GFA?
Oh, go away.

What's part of the GFA cannot undermine it; what isn't, can.
 

Breanainn

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Certainly no-one in RoI wants a referendum within the next decade, but if the next Stormont election produces a nationalist majority, it may be thrust upon us, as both votes have to be held simultaneously. Much like the All-Ireland Brexit fora recently, that may be the time to resurrect the New Ireland Forum, but expand its remit to include civic organisations and business representatives to find an agreed approach and roadpath.
 

Man or Mouse

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No matter what side of the political debate you find yourself on with regards to Irish Unity; it is pretty obvious that the possibility of it happening are now more real than just a few short years ago.

Shifting demographics, Brexit and BBC Poll Results are just some of the reasons why Irish Unity has become a topical subject outside of traditional Northern Nationalist vox pop magazines.

A recent BBC poll found 42% of respondents would vote for unification.

Former First Minister of Northern Ireland, Peter Robinson, quite rightly came out to say that even if a border poll passed with the smallest of margins, there are no plans in place to bring it to a reality.
- He is quite right.

I think Varadkar visiting the Orange Museum is a good start. Unionists will be a cherished community within a United Ireland and it is a good thing to see the Irish government extend an olive branch.

But such public displays of friendship will not deliver a successful United Ireland.

For every reason above; I believe it is time that the Irish government start to recognise their role in securing a United Ireland as per the provisions of Bunreacht.


As a United Ireland is coming closer to being brought about by democratic means, it is now incumbent on the Irish government to lay the ground work, as it were.

This may include setting up a Department or assigning a Minister for Unification.
At the very least, it should include a detailed and all encompassing white paper setting out how it will be delivered in the event of a Yes to unity vote.

Failure to take aforementioned steps under the present climate will render claims to be a "United Ireland party" spurious.


-rus.
Do you want to drive Arlene and the lads up the walls altogether? I saw one comment on Slugger in relation to Leo having the temerity to visit the jurisdiction and his words were; "Varadaker would want to reel his neck in."

How can you propose anything with such people? Ironically, it is that attitude exactly that is going to see them with a 50% +1 situation. Then the fat is surely in the fire.
 

Man or Mouse

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Both the letter and the spirit of the GFA is that the future of NI rests in the hands of the people of NI, without interference from outside. Any sugh plan would be seenm especially on the Unionist side, as gross interference.
Careful you don't sneeze either. They see a lot of things as interference.
 

GDPR

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The Oireachtas joint committee on implementing the GFA published a report on the aftermath of Irish Unity only last year:
https://data.oireachtas.ie/ie/oireachtas/committee/dail/32/joint_committee_on_the_implementation_of_the_good_friday_agreement/reports/2017/2017-08-02_brexit-and-the-future-of-ireland-uniting-ireland-and-its-people-in-peace-and-prosperity_en.pdf

Are you saying that the Irish committee charged with overseeing the GFA goes against the letter and spirit of the GFA?
Implementing the GFA is the business of Ireland, the UK, the EU, the USA and the UN all of whom are co-signatories or stake-holders. Ireland would be in breach if it made any move over and beyond what the Treaty says - it is wholly up to the people of NI to decide their own future either within the Republic or without.

The GFA is the most significant British Treaty since the Treaty of Windsor, and that has never been abrogated. (Check it up).
 


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