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Is it time now to disband the Garda Siochana and replace them with a force more suited to a contemporary Ireland


nationalsday

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Is it time now to disband the Garda Siochana and replace them with a force more suited to a contemporary Ireland

The Morris Tribunal cost the taxpayer over 88 million euros and the principal areas investigated were the issues of corruption and nepotism within the force. The Garda Siochana Act in 20005 was enacted to deal with the problems identified in the Tribunal findings. Do you think that since 2005 your confidence in the Gardai has been enhanced, or, as per the title, should we scrap the whole institution and start again?
 


nonpartyboy

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Was the morris tribunal not about donegal ?......

All i have to say is that,fine if you want an even more touchy feely police force than the gardai, then you can change the law to allow legal firearms to be held for home defence and personal protection purposes.

Because maybe you haven't noticed but law and order is not in the best of health in this land.

Then take a trip to spain or france or italy and see their touchy feely police......not, even the dumbest paddies know you don't mess with them boys because they will smash your head in !.
 

cb1979

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One of the great missed opportunities in recent Irish politics was regarding policing and the Good Friday Agreement. While the Patten Report was being compiled in the north a similar root and branch reform of policing should have been undertaken in the south. Unfortunately, to even imply that there may be some problems with an Garda Síochána immediately labels you as a subversive and this has damaged policing in the state.
 

nonpartyboy

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One of the great missed opportunities in recent Irish politics was regarding policing and the Good Friday Agreement. While the Patten Report was being compiled in the north a similar root and branch reform of policing should have been undertaken in the south. Unfortunately, to even imply that there may be some problems with an Garda Síochána immediately labels you as a subversive and this has damaged policing in the state.
The psni though are not policing in a "normal" country, they have to be seen to be working to tie in with the whole "peace process" but it seems to me that policing has just been withdrawn from hugh aera's of the north full stop, that's a bit like "smart" policing.
 

Skyrocket

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The Morris Tribunal cost the taxpayer over 88 million euros and the principal areas investigated were the issues of corruption and nepotism within the force.
The principal areas investigated were corruption and incompetence in the Donegal division that was allowed to flourish because of the lack of leadership and incompetence of senior officers in the that division. There is nothing in the reports about nepotism.
 

nationalsday

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Better try to bolster my own thread, eh? Re. Claire Daly saga - who was on the retainer for tipping off the press? i.e. that's not civic duty that's a nixer. I'm just p*ssed off that I'm still paying for the Tribunal who made recommendations to abolish such corruption
 
Last edited:

fuque

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What ya thinking non-national,
A little something more diversified for 'contemporary' Ireland?

[video=youtube;ZRuSS0iiFyo]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=ZRuSS0iiFyo[/video]
least these guys dont "pretend" to be upstanding.
 

hiding behind a poster

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The Morris Tribunal cost the taxpayer over 88 million euros and the principal areas investigated were the issues of corruption and nepotism within the force. The Garda Siochana Act in 20005 was enacted to deal with the problems identified in the Tribunal findings. Do you think that since 2005 your confidence in the Gardai has been enhanced, or, as per the title, should we scrap the whole institution and start again?
No.
 

SideysGhost

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A woefully ill-trained, ignorant, disorganised, shoddy, corrupt and unfit for purpose shambolic excuse for a police service, where advancement above a certain rank requires political patronage? There's African basketcases have a better police service FFS.

As an organisation it's a bloody joke frankly. But the mindless conservative imbecile block that dominate Irish life cannot countenance any criticism, or attempts at reform of the Gardai. To speak ill of the guards is one of the unforgivable cardinal sins of Paddyland.
 

pippakin

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There is no need to disband and start again, most of the recruits would be existing members of An Garda Síochána.

However a glance at recent events shows there is cause for concern. I was shocked at the number of close family members worked in the force. It gives the strong impression of nepotism within the force, even to get the job.
 

hiding behind a poster

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There is no need to disband and start again, most of the recruits would be existing members of An Garda Síochána.

However a glance at recent events shows there is cause for concern. I was shocked at the number of close family members worked in the force. It gives the strong impression of nepotism within the force, even to get the job.
No it doesn't. It gives the impression that in many families, there's a strong tradition of public service.
 

pippakin

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No it doesn't. It gives the impression that in many families, there's a strong tradition of public service.
A strong tradition of a well paid job with a good early retirement pension and with family members ready to smooth the path and cover up any little mistakes is that what you mean.

It gives a very unhealthy appearance of the force. Are new applicants denied opportunity and lesser applicants accepted because of who they are related to? That is the question such family 'traditions' raise.
 

SideysGhost

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No it doesn't. It gives the impression that in many families, there's a strong tradition of public service.
Yeah right

The alleged street value of the coke seized in this case is also very, very strange. 18000 grammes of coke would have a street value close to 1.8 million, not the 130K claimed by the gardai.

Shall we mention here, perchance, the curious case of Kieran Boylan?

Or the recurring and all-pervasive problem of slum landlords who nearly always turn out to be....guards.

Also HBAP you would do well to remember that I was personally involved with aspects of the Morris Tribunal, gave evidence to the Carty Inquiry, and know all too well from up-close-and-personal experience, how utterly corrupt the AGS really is. Reactionary right-wing "our boys right or wrong" drivel is profoundly corrosive, unpatriotic, and damaging to the fundamental fabric of society.
 

controller

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There is no need to disband and start again, most of the recruits would be existing members of An Garda Síochána.
However a glance at recent events shows there is cause for concern. I was shocked at the number of close family members worked in the force. It gives the strong impression of nepotism within the force, even to get the job.
I also note families where there are many Teachers, Nurses, Doctors & Engineers. Should we stop every boy trying to have the same job as his dad, because you object. What happened, did nobody wipe the points off your licence??
 

pippakin

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I also note famalies where there are many Teachers, Nurses, Doctors & Engineers. Should we stop every boy trying to have the same job as his dad, because you object. What happened, did nobody wipe the points off your licence??
It depends on the environment and the number of family members involved. What you seem to think is alright in An Garda Síochána is exactly what is condemned in some politicians. An Garda Síochána have to be more than clean they have to be seen to be clean and anything that threatens such a perception is wrong.
 

ManOfReason

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Just double the number and kit them out like this:



That might finally make it safe to walk around Dublin city centre.
 

Irish National member

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The Morris Tribunal cost the taxpayer over 88 million euros and the principal areas investigated were the issues of corruption and nepotism within the force. The Garda Siochana Act in 20005 was enacted to deal with the problems identified in the Tribunal findings. Do you think that since 2005 your confidence in the Gardai has been enhanced, or, as per the title, should we scrap the whole institution and start again?
Irish National had a proposal of total reform for the gardai. the requirements for entry should be of a higher standard, also training standards to rise with regular ongoing training throughout their career. regular assesments to make sure they are up to scratch, a completely independant unit to be set up to perform these assessments in addition to acting as a garda watchdog to 'police the police' so to speak. equiptment etc to be brought out of the dark ages aswell, replacement of vehicles that are beyond advanced performance. some of the current fleet wouldnt pass through an average n.c.t. the uniform is another item that would need to change the current get up looks more like a ticket collectors uniform. another item we would consider would be the use of tazer guns if the above training were in place and the above watchdog unit in place these self defence non lethal weapons would not cause major concerns for us. there is a force that uses these, it escapes me where at the moment, but they have a mechanism on the weapon that reads the usage and each individual has to account for every use.
 

InsideImDancing

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Irish National had a proposal of total reform for the gardai. the requirements for entry should be of a higher standard, also training standards to rise with regular ongoing training throughout their career. regular assesments to make sure they are up to scratch, a completely independant unit to be set up to perform these assessments in addition to acting as a garda watchdog to 'police the police' so to speak. equiptment etc to be brought out of the dark ages aswell, replacement of vehicles that are beyond advanced performance. some of the current fleet wouldnt pass through an average n.c.t. the uniform is another item that would need to change the current get up looks more like a ticket collectors uniform. another item we would consider would be the use of tazer guns if the above training were in place and the above watchdog unit in place these self defence non lethal weapons would not cause major concerns for us. there is a force that uses these, it escapes me where at the moment, but they have a mechanism on the weapon that reads the usage and each individual has to account for every use.
Where would you get the dough for all this?

Tazers are used in the north and Britain.
 

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