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Is someone importing foreign €2 coin look-alikes?


seabhcan

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Has anyone else noticed the large number of foreign currency €2 coin look-alikes in circulation in Ireland? I've been caught a few times over the last few days.

Particularly common is the 10 Thai Baht coin, worth 20 cent, which looks identical to the €2 coin, and the South African 5 Rand coin which is worth 50 cent.

Suddenly, these coins are everywhere, which makes me suspect its an organised effort, rather than just change coming home in people's pockets.
 
Last edited:


euroboy

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I thought it was just me. I was had with the bottom coin.

Foreign mints should be more careful in what type of coins they issue and limit the opportunity for such scams. You would have to wonder about the thought processes of the officidom that decide to issue coins similiar in appearance to strong currencies.

Perhaps the EU should implement sanctions to stop the such scams, by cutting aid/bilateral agreements
 

rockofcashel

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Got caught with the two Baht coin in Tramore on Sunday.. no doubt it seems like it is organised if it is increasingly turning up around the country

Nice scam.. 10 times the upturn, and much less chance of it being noticed than a paper money scam.. just a lot more working laundering it
 

Dian Cécht

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......

Foreign mints should be more careful in what type of coins they issue and limit the opportunity for such scams. You would have to wonder about the thought processes of the officidom that decide to issue coins similiar in appearance to strong currencies.

Perhaps the EU should implement sanctions to stop the such scams, by cutting aid/bilateral agreements
Do you not think, Euroboy, that most (if not all) Euro coin look-alikes have been around a lot longer than the Euro. The Thailand ten-baht coin has been around since the late eighties and so has the South African 5 Rand coin.

Perhaps the geniuses that brought us the Euro should have made sure their coins were not similar to ones already in use elsewhere.
 

collina

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I thought it was just me. I was had with the bottom coin.

Foreign mints should be more careful in what type of coins they issue and limit the opportunity for such scams. You would have to wonder about the thought processes of the officidom that decide to issue coins similiar in appearance to strong currencies.

Perhaps the EU should implement sanctions to stop the such scams, by cutting aid/bilateral agreements
Caught by the same one. Maybe the foreign mints issued their look-a-likes first.
 

eyeSpy

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The 5 Dirham coin from Morocco is another one which is similar (worth about 50c).
But I'm not sure if I brought that back with me to resurface months later in a trouser or if I was handed it in a shop.
Poxy vending machines know the difference.
I gave up trying to pass it off in petrol stations with no luck.

Africa - Coins of Morocco
 

yehbut_nobut

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I think the point of this thread is to query if it's an organised thing or if there's a sudden marked increase in the practice. Not to compile a list of coins that look like other coins. ;)
 

stripey cat

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Yeah, it must be an organised effort.

Each coin represents a slight profit for the gang, who also have to go to the trouble of passing them off by buying lots of things which cost much less than two euros.

They can then keep the change.

How much would a round trip to Thailand cost- around €1500 at the cheapest?

It's a genius plan. We're dealing with a criminal mastermind here...
 

eoinod

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Yeah, it must be an organised effort.

Each coin represents a slight profit for the gang, who also have to go to the trouble of passing them off by buying lots of things which cost much less than two euros.

They can then keep the change.

How much would a round trip to Thailand cost- around €1500 at the cheapest?

It's a genius plan. We're dealing with a criminal mastermind here...
I know a boy who when around 12 ( a year or two after the euro came out) got a load of lirae on a family trip to Turkey and financed his trips to tesco for sweets after school for months.
 

rockofcashel

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Yeah, it must be an organised effort.

Each coin represents a slight profit for the gang, who also have to go to the trouble of passing them off by buying lots of things which cost much less than two euros.

They can then keep the change.

How much would a round trip to Thailand cost- around €1500 at the cheapest?

It's a genius plan. We're dealing with a criminal mastermind here...
You'd be very surprised how quickly and easily you could pass off a lot of these coins.. for example, like what happened up on Sunday in Tramore.. fairgrounds pass off huge numbers of coins in a day ... pubs, nightclubs, shops, etc etc... 5 to 6 times profit on each coin (taken into account the cost of bringing them over), and you could make a tidy sum in a short time
 

myksav

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Two Litai coins have been used wholesale in vending machines instead of 1 Euro coins. The metal colour is reversed to the €1 so they don't pass easily in face to face transactions.
 

cedarwood10

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I remember student friends who used to use the old fifty pence pieces in vending machines and phone boxes in Germany. A case of what goes around comes around?
 

Baron von Biffo

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Yeah, it must be an organised effort.

Each coin represents a slight profit for the gang, who also have to go to the trouble of passing them off by buying lots of things which cost much less than two euros.

They can then keep the change.

How much would a round trip to Thailand cost- around €1500 at the cheapest?

It's a genius plan. We're dealing with a criminal mastermind here...
Yeah, it's a bit like the old story of the master forger who used to fake 10p coins by filing the corners off 50p pieces.
 

rockofcashel

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I remember student friends who used to use the old fifty pence pieces in vending machines and phone boxes in Germany. A case of what goes around comes around?
It was the five pence coin in germany was it not

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_pence_(Irish_decimal_coin)

I think in fact, the story went, that the Germans demanded that the Irish mint change the dimensions of the coin to stop its abuse in Germany.

I remember my brother working there, and he used to change loads of money into 5p coins whenever he was going back after Christmas
 

Magror14

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I have seen those Rand and Baht coins before. Dont think they look much like 2 Euro coins. The days there are so many strong Eagle German coins around I'd just check for the eagle and then double check if it isn't there.
 

stripey cat

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You'd be very surprised how quickly and easily you could pass off a lot of these coins.. for example, like what happened up on Sunday in Tramore.. fairgrounds pass off huge numbers of coins in a day ... pubs, nightclubs, shops, etc etc... 5 to 6 times profit on each coin (taken into account the cost of bringing them over), and you could make a tidy sum in a short time

Right, let's think this through.

You want to make the price of the flight to Thailand.

You need to pass off 750 €2 coins to make €1500.

But wait, you need to recoup the costs of buying the coins, so add 20%.

That's nine hundred coins.

Now say you are in the happy position that you are a retailer. Every time someone asks for something which require €2 in the change, you slip them a Thai coin. You only have to do this 900 times without anyone noticing, and you're back in the black.

Sounds like a plan.
 

TheMushyStuff

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Thanks for the warning I will keep my eyes open for such scams..
 

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