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Is the new government serious about affordable housing, going by the gimmicks announced recently?

patslatt

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The new government plans to approach the Central Bank to beg it to change the rules on the 20% minimum downpayment on house purchases and treat the past two years of rent paid by mortgage applicants as a deduction from the 20%. The Central Bank should point out that that it is not in house buyers' interest to encourage buying of houses they probably can't afford if they can't save a 20% downpayment and that reducing downpayments would increase buying pressure on a scarce supply of housing in Dublin, Cork and Galway,driving up prices further. Another government gimmick is the suggestion of VAT rebates for spending on home refurbishings. These gimmicks may simply divert attention from the real reforms needed for increasing affordable housing.

Top of the list of reforms should be removal of planning permissions,zoning and investment in water and sewage for new housing from councils who have done nothing for housing building in the face of opposition from NIMBY (not in my backyard) home owners. Because councillors are elected by NIMBY home owners who turn out to vote, councils naturally pander to NIMBYISM.

Some might regard such a removal of planning as a blow to local government. However, planning offices could be kept locally, though reporting to the Ministry of the Environment or to a joint committee of representatives from both the Ministry and the local government.

Other reforms could include:
[]Restoring the training facilities for construction trades which in many institutes of technology were largely abolished after the construction crash. There is now a shortage of building trades people.
[]Reducing the marginal tax rate on average incomes, among the highest in the EU at 52%, to attract home emigrant Irish trades people. They could take a cut in pay but not paying higher taxes on lower Irish wages.
[]Reforming court procedures to speed up bank repossessions on home mortgage defaults. Banks can't be expected to lend to average risks if they can't repossess homes in a reasonable time and will only lend to low risk borrowers.
[]Getting rid of politically correct rules about local neighborhood employment in affordable housing schemes and their cost plus contracts which incentivise very high construction costs. It's not as if efficient building trades people and physically fit building labourers are available in every Irish neighborhood.

Unless the government acts decisively on reforms, Dublin's housing costs will remain unaffordable on Dublin wages of young people. The combination of rocketing Dublin rents and very high marginal tax rates of 52% on incomes a bit above the average will deter young people from working in Dublin. Since most economic growth in Ireland is in Dublin, that would mean a sharp reduction in growth, if not an economic slump.
 


drummed

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Getting more development outside Dublin would lead to less pressure there and reduce the problems. Simple really.
 

wombat

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Ffs, the govt was appointed on Friday, wait to see what they do.
 

raspberry tea

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Getting more development outside Dublin would lead to less pressure there and reduce the problems. Simple really.
SO?Ugly urban sprawl is the answer,it might be in sweden,but it is not here,we need FOOD SECURITY...Pouring concrete over prime fertile land for agriculture and grazing is what we need,we need a strong bargaining chip with the rest of the world and our own personal food security,as that will get shaky in less than a decade and if we don't have our own food security we can wave goodbye to having good clout with the rest of the world...Why trade prime profitable agri land for what?Concrete?Paper pushers and multinationals that could up and leave to poland and china at the drop of a hat when it suits them,leaving people jobless and homeless?Thats how we got into this mess in the first place,multinationals moving out - having an over reliance on them and the property devleopers...A MESS!
 

GDPR

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Would getting rid of zoning not lead to greater spawn and it's associated problems? Councils have already lost water and sewer services or at least for the time being. The soon extinct dept of environment has not covered itself in glory this century and I'd be wary of more centralisation of power with the potential for less accountability and scrutiny. In principle though I've nothing against your suggestions, just outlining some thoughts. Ensuring affordability and supply is certainly a priority.
 

patslatt

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Getting more development outside Dublin would lead to less pressure there and reduce the problems. Simple really.
Multinationals which are the driving force of the economy largely want capital city locations in Dublin for access to advanced high tech labour forces and services needed by corporate headquarters ie legal, finance, accountancy, marketing etc.
 

patslatt

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Ffs, the govt was appointed on Friday, wait to see what they do.
Largely the same cast of FG characters have the key ministries. Housing is a highly political issue because of NIMBY voting power and political pandering to it.
 

patslatt

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SO?Ugly urban sprawl is the answer,it might be in sweden,but it is not here,we need FOOD SECURITY...Pouring concrete over prime fertile land for agriculture and grazing is what we need,we need a strong bargaining chip with the rest of the world and our own personal food security,as that will get shaky in less than a decade and if we don't have our own food security we can wave goodbye to having good clout with the rest of the world...Why trade prime profitable agri land for what?Concrete?Paper pushers and multinationals that could up and leave to poland and china at the drop of a hat when it suits them,leaving people jobless and homeless?Thats how we got into this mess in the first place,multinationals moving out - having an over reliance on them and the property devleopers...A MESS!
Agriculture is overrated given its small proportion of the economy. It has an important role as a supplier to the food processing industries, however.
 

Man or Mouse

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They are probably well meaning enough. Problem is, the banks.
 

patslatt

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Would getting rid of zoning not lead to greater spawn and it's associated problems? Councils have already lost water and sewer services or at least for the time being. The soon extinct dept of environment has not covered itself in glory this century and I'd be wary of more centralisation of power with the potential for less accountability and scrutiny. In principle though I've nothing against your suggestions, just outlining some thoughts. Ensuring affordability and supply is certainly a priority.
Within Dublin, there is too much open space for parks and golf courses which should be rezoned for housing given the housing shortage. Also, the height limit of seven stories for apartments in architecturally mediocre parts of Dublin wastes extremely valuable urban land and should be scrapped.

Unfortunately, centralisation of planning is essential to counter NIMBY influence over councils in Dublin,Cork and Galway. However, local planning offices could be kept in place to provide local knowledge to the Department of the Environment.
 

drummed

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Multinationals which are the driving force of the economy largely want capital city locations in Dublin for access to advanced high tech labour forces and services needed by corporate headquarters ie legal, finance, accountancy, marketing etc.
So get those services down to Longford then! Do I have to think of everything?
 

raspberry tea

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Agriculture is overrated given its small proportion of the economy. It has an important role as a supplier to the food processing industries, however.
Agriculture is being forced out of the economy for paper pushers and multinationals that would f*ck off to poland or india at a moments notice...Not what a stable economy needs right now we need to think further...
Agriculture is an industry that if given a chance will always be around,due to the connection to the immediate land around them,unlike the multinationals these farmers are not going to f*ck off to china or poland and leave thousands of families without money or food on the table,some will end up homeless...The golf stick swinging CEO's of Globalist multinationals do not care,and do whatever is economically viable...To a paper pusher agriculture may seem overrated,especially if you do not have a connection to your land but it is not....Food security is what we need in shaky times ahead,future projections from reliable sources say that we will increase to a number of 9 billion people on the planet,that is a lot of mouths to feed - and a lot of political pressure to feed them,what if we had no food security and just lived in one giant housing estate/city - had nothing growing and we were reliant on china or africa to feed us,and throw a food crisis into the mix,what would happen?England has NO FOOD SECURITY - they chose to prioritise housing penniless pakistani immigrants as opposed to turning a lot of land into agricultural/grazing land - the problem now is they are reliant on all those lorries coming from routes like Calais where immigrants are breaking into the trucks and crates and sh*tting and pissing on them....
 

Spanner Island

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Feb 22, 2011
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Getting more development outside Dublin would lead to less pressure there and reduce the problems. Simple really.
I'm hoping this is dripping in sarcasm?

If not I think you're wrong...

The vast majority of ghost estates that will never be developed are outside Dublin...

Shifting people further out solved nothing last time round, contributed massively to urban sprawl and a miserable commuter lifestyle for many... so no reason to expect it to work a second time round...

Increased density in Dublin - relaxing the height rules in a few parts of the city where taller buildings can be clustered would be more of a help...
 

toastedheretic

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Nov 17, 2015
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4,279
Agriculture is being forced out of the economy for paper pushers and multinationals that would f*ck off to poland or india at a moments notice...Not what a stable economy needs right now we need to think further...
Agriculture is an industry that if given a chance will always be around,due to the connection to the immediate land around them,unlike the multinationals these farmers are not going to f*ck off to china or poland and leave thousands of families without money or food on the table,some will end up homeless...The golf stick swinging CEO's of Globalist multinationals do not care,and do whatever is economically viable...To a paper pusher agriculture may seem overrated,especially if you do not have a connection to your land but it is not....Food security is what we need in shaky times ahead,future projections from reliable sources say that we will increase to a number of 9 billion people on the planet,that is a lot of mouths to feed - and a lot of political pressure to feed them,what if we had no food security and just lived in one giant housing estate/city - had nothing growing and we were reliant on china or africa to feed us,and throw a food crisis into the mix,what would happen?England has NO FOOD SECURITY - they chose to prioritise housing penniless pakistani immigrants as opposed to turning a lot of land into agricultural/grazing land - the problem now is they are reliant on all those lorries coming from routes like Calais where immigrants are breaking into the trucks and crates and sh*tting and pissing on them....
If you ditch all the racist ************************e ,you make some very valid points, points the Brexit heads need to dwell on, food security must always be default.

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toastedheretic

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Nov 17, 2015
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Agriculture is overrated given its small proportion of the economy. It has an important role as a supplier to the food processing industries, however.
Try taking a twenty out of your arse pocket and eating it, then tell me Agriculture is overrated.

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popular1

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Feb 4, 2009
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3,212
The first thing they would want to do is be able to count
If you let 50000 yellow pack workers every year to satisfy the need for cheap labour
You have a crisis till the economy goes bang again
 


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