Is Turkey now a 'Hostile State'?

stopdoingstuff

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that bird in the blue cardigan...............wow ;) although her political view is up her beautiful ass
Yeah. She clearly needs to be exposed to some of the realities of life but she is really hot. But women should be left wing in my opinion, because it makes patronizing them so much more fun when they are wrong.
 


Ren84

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Thankfully Turkey won't be joining the EEC anytime soon. What is it about muslims majority countries that causes a huge decline in the Christian and Jewish population? The religion of super peas has a problem it will never eradicate.
Of course Turkey won't be joining the EEC. It hasn't existed for decades.
 

bunkmoreland

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Turkey do not want to join the EU. I work in Turkey a fair amount, love Istanbul, but am worried about Erdogn and the increasing rise of Islamist fundamentalism in the country. This is something that the secularists in Turkey are worried about also. The Gisi riots were part of this reaction to a dictator which Erdogan is now. For the first time in years, Istanbul now feels like a police state. The meer hint of people congregating brings water cannon and police being bussed in. The burkah is in evidence everywhere.


Yet this country has many Islamic businessmen who do not want to become part of an Islamic state. It would be a disaster for Turkey, which is doing rather well economically. Erdogan has his palace(s) and his plane(s) and there is a huge amount of bitterness in the way he iis leading the country. Even amongst "covered" people. His blatant abuse of power is leaving serious issues which are bubbling at the moment. Many Turkish business people are moving to open businesses abroad, for fear of something major happening in Turkey itself. Erdogan is a little man, not educated, and (according to those with whom I have spoken to) being guided by those in the background, according to many he is not the sharpest tool in the chest.

Gizi saw young and old, rich and poor, protest against the destruction of Taksim Park and the ruination of the area. The knocking down of many fantastic buildings on the opposite side of the square to build a shopping center (by Erdogan's friends) has caused major issues. Gizi was a reaction to all of this. Remember Istanbul is not representative of the vast majority of Turkey, Ankara is far more Islamic in outlook. Currently there is a serious under current of Police state occuring. I cannot verify what I have been told by many, but police are being fired and new "police" who back the government being employed. I have heard this from several of the poeple I have socialised with.

I just hope that the secularists get more power in this country (not that I can see this happening) Ataturk must be turning in his grave.
I spent a week in Turkey recently--two days in Antalya-a city of about one million on the Med Coast, and a few days in Cappadocia in the interior. On a day's visit to Dublin last week I saw a few more burka clad women and far more Africans than I saw in the week in Turkey. Actually I saw more Africans in Loughrea last week than in the week in Turkey.
 

southwestkerry

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Turkey is more a threat than Syria. In fact Turkey is probably more dangerous than any other Mid est country. They can not be trusted in the lest.
 

He3

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Turkey do not want to join the EU. I work in Turkey a fair amount, love Istanbul, but am worried about Erdogn and the increasing rise of Islamist fundamentalism in the country. This is something that the secularists in Turkey are worried about also. The Gisi riots were part of this reaction to a dictator which Erdogan is now. For the first time in years, Istanbul now feels like a police state. The meer hint of people congregating brings water cannon and police being bussed in. The burkah is in evidence everywhere.


Yet this country has many Islamic businessmen who do not want to become part of an Islamic state. It would be a disaster for Turkey, which is doing rather well economically. Erdogan has his palace(s) and his plane(s) and there is a huge amount of bitterness in the way he iis leading the country. Even amongst "covered" people. His blatant abuse of power is leaving serious issues which are bubbling at the moment. Many Turkish business people are moving to open businesses abroad, for fear of something major happening in Turkey itself. Erdogan is a little man, not educated, and (according to those with whom I have spoken to) being guided by those in the background, according to many he is not the sharpest tool in the chest.

Gizi saw young and old, rich and poor, protest against the destruction of Taksim Park and the ruination of the area. The knocking down of many fantastic buildings on the opposite side of the square to build a shopping center (by Erdogan's friends) has caused major issues. Gizi was a reaction to all of this. Remember Istanbul is not representative of the vast majority of Turkey, Ankara is far more Islamic in outlook. Currently there is a serious under current of Police state occuring. I cannot verify what I have been told by many, but police are being fired and new "police" who back the government being employed. I have heard this from several of the poeple I have socialised with.

I just hope that the secularists get more power in this country (not that I can see this happening) Ataturk must be turning in his grave.
Sounds all too familiar.

They do like Johnny Logan though.
 

IvoShandor

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yes
I also found that they don't have a great fondness for Arabs so I don't think there is much chance of them following any of their antics.
One would think so, given their history. It sounds reasonable, and lets hope you are right.....but..a note of caution. We can no longer underestimate the insidious,seductive and resilient power of extremist Sunni Islam, backed as it is by Gulf money and populist, unscrupulous politicians. Countries hitherto believed to be moderate like Tunisia, non-Arab countries like Malaysia,Indonesia and the Maldives and Western converts to Islam have all been shown to be vulnerable to its siren call. We can take nothing for granted any more.
One would think that people like Erdogan and his like in other states would realize that in trying to use, co-opt or control political Islam they are playing with fire.
 

Analyzer

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Turkey's ruling party is backed by a regime in Saudi Arabia that is currently unsure on whether or not to allow women to drive cars.
 

truthandjustice

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Of course Turkey won't be joining the EEC. It hasn't existed for decades.
Islam calls itself the religion of peas n gravy and the also doesn't exist. I call it the EEC to keep me happy on the inside. Let me dream of happy Times when Ireland was a nice place to live in.
 

fuque

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Liam60

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From my time working in Turkey I got the impression that the vast majority of Turks are West-leaning modernists and are no more devout in their Islam than the rest of us are in our Christianity; ie Turkey is by and large a modern, secular state (wearing the full Islamic outfit is in fact, illegal as it is seen as seditious)! But of course Turkey has it's extremists albeit a relatively small percentage of the population, whom they regard as a nuisance. An even bigger nuisance, in the minds of the majority, are the Kurds who, it is said, cannot be pleased no matter what you do for them. So, I expect the Turks are very ambivalent about the Kurds fighting ISEL just across the Syrian border and certainly are slow about arming them sufficiently for them to end up a victorious, well-armed force ready to take up the fight with Turkey to secure their long-sought independence. Far better they feel, that the poor Pashmurga just about hold off ISEL but are seriously weakened in the effort. Naturally, the Americans/NATO fully support their allies in this. The Kurds want to establish Kurdistan taking small parts of Syria, Iraq and Turkey to do so while none of those three states wants to concede any territory. So, it's complicated and, as it would be anywhere else, nasty and brutish. However, I personally found the Turks to be extremely hospitable, friendly, helpful, modern and the opposite of extremists. I believe it would strengthen the EU greatly if they were admitted.
 

redneck

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But the crazy regime in Saudi Arabia is backed by the US!!!!
Well I mean look at the gun culture in the US. With the death penalty also in a lot of states. Every country has it's own particular way of dealing with things.
Is Turkey any different. I don't know. But I do know it helped in the fight against Communism.
At present Pope Francis is visiting it so lets hope and pray there will be some kind of progress there for Christians. Finally there is a giant state on the EU borders, it is called Russia. Which is the bigger threat?Go Turkey Official Tourism Portal of Turkey
 

Ren84

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Islam calls itself the religion of peas n gravy and the also doesn't exist. I call it the EEC to keep me happy on the inside. Let me dream of happy Times when Ireland was a nice place to live in.
It's not the EEC, hasn't been called that in decades.
 

Druidess

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From my time working in Turkey I got the impression that the vast majority of Turks are West-leaning modernists and are no more devout in their Islam than the rest of us are in our Christianity; ie Turkey is by and large a modern, secular state (wearing the full Islamic outfit is in fact, illegal as it is seen as seditious)! But of course Turkey has it's extremists albeit a relatively small percentage of the population, whom they regard as a nuisance.
If it were true that the majority of Turks are secular, why on earth does Erdogan's misogynistic and backwards statements appeal so much?
An even bigger nuisance, in the minds of the majority, are the Kurds who, it is said, cannot be pleased no matter what you do for them.
They want autonomy to rule their own affairs, speak their own language and practice their own customs. The closer they can get to an sovereign Kurdish state, the better. Can't blame them for that particularly when Turkey has treated them so badly.

So, it's complicated and, as it would be anywhere else, nasty and brutish. However, I personally found the Turks to be extremely hospitable, friendly, helpful, modern and the opposite of extremists. I believe it would strengthen the EU greatly if they were admitted.
If your statement that the Turks are as secular as the Irish were true, I would agree with you. But Europe's quota for violent extremists has been filled to capacity. On the basis of Turkey's (on the face of it) move away from secularism and flirtation with madness I would have to disagree.
 


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