Is Ulster Scots a form of text messages or a langugage ?

SlabMurphy

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I was on an Ulster Scots language website and amazingly I didn't know but I could actually understand another language :eek:

Hello! - Ulster Scots " Hi ye daen! "

Are you well - " Ir ye weel "

Where do you live - " Whur dae ye leeve "

But to me this 'language' looks like a sort of text message. What do you think ?
 


Feckfiannafail

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ROTFLMFAO

rowling on tae fluir lauffing ma fat arse aff:p what a ************************************g joke of a so called language
 

picador

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I was on an Ulster Scots language website and amazingly I didn't know but I could actually understand another language :eek:

Hello! - Ulster Scots " Hi ye daen! "

Are you well - " Ir ye weel "

Where do you live - " Whur dae ye leeve "

But to me this 'language' looks like a sort of text message. What do you think ?
If only all language learning could be so easy!

Probably a better question to ask is - is Scots a langauge?

The answer to that is largely a political one.
 

Interista

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The answer to that is largely a political one.
Exactly. There's that old saying "A language is a dialect with a flag and an army'.

In purely linguistic terms, there's no hard and fast rules about what differentiates a language from a dialect. Swedish, Danish and Norwegian are largely mutually comprehensible but are classed as different languages for obvious political reasons. Conversely, a few years ago we used to speak of 'Serbo-Croat' but now we're told that the inhabitants of the Fmr Yugoslavia speak Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian and, the new arrival to the Balkan family of languages, 'Montenegrin'.
 

antiestablishmentarian

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If mutual intelligebility is a mark of a dialect rather than a language, then Scots/Ulster Scots is definitely a separate language as most english speakers couldn't understand a socts speaker.
 

fluffykontbiscuits

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Exactly. There's that old saying "A language is a dialect with a flag and an army'.

In purely linguistic terms, there's no hard and fast rules about what differentiates a language from a dialect. Swedish, Danish and Norwegian are largely mutually comprehensible but are classed as different languages for obvious political reasons. Conversely, a few years ago we used to speak of 'Serbo-Croat' but now we're told that the inhabitants of the Fmr Yugoslavia speak Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian and, the new arrival to the Balkan family of languages, 'Montenegrin'.
Just to add Norwegian is also subdivided into two languages itself. One is called Bokmal or something like that. Good point Picador well put :)
 

Own Arris

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Ulster Scots should be given the status of official EU language. It would make it easier and more entertaining when dealing with 'Eurospeak'
 

darkhorse

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I was on an Ulster Scots language website and amazingly I didn't know but I could actually understand another language :eek:

Hello! - Ulster Scots " Hi ye daen! "

Are you well - " Ir ye weel "

Where do you live - " Whur dae ye leeve "

But to me this 'language' looks like a sort of text message. What do you think ?
It has an uncanny resemblance to the slurred language spoken by many after a nights drinking...
 

Kitty O'Shea

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Oh dear, I hope not too many Scots read this thread!!! I'm actually surprised that its not known the Scots (incl Ulster Scots) is a language in its own right! BTW Auld Lang Syne (New Year song) is actually a poem written in Scots.
Anyway to avoid any big debate I'd suggest ye read this:
What is Scots?
Scots is the collective name for Scottish dialects also known as 'Doric', 'Lallans' and 'Scotch' or by more local names such as 'Buchan', 'Dundonian', 'Glesca' or 'Shetland', to name a few. Taken altogether, Scottish dialects are called the Scots language. It is the traditional Germanic language of Lowland Scotland and the Northern Isles. It is also used in parts of Ulster. Along with Scottish English and Gaelic, it is one of Scotland's three main languages at the present time.

Where did it come from?
Scots is descended from a form of Anglo-Saxon, brought to the southeast of what is now Scotland around the seventh century by the Angles, one of the Germanic-speaking peoples who began to arrive in the British Isles in the fifth century. English is also descended from the language of these peoples.
By the 11th century, Gaelic, descended from the Celtic language brought over from the north of Ireland by the original Scots, had become the dominant language in most of the emerging kingdom. At this point, another form of Northern Anglo-Saxon arrived - the speech of the followers of the Anglo-Norman landowners and of the members of the newly settled monastic orders, who came north mainly from what is now Yorkshire. This area had been part of the Danelaw and the language had strong Scandinavian elements still seen in Scots (and northern English) to this day (e.g. gate street, kirk church).

How did it develop?
This language flourished in the growing trade in the newly-formed burghs, and it developed with further influence from French (e.g. ashet serving plate, douce quiet, respectable), Latin (e..g. dominie schoolmaster, preses chairman), Dutch (e.g. loun lad, redd clear, tidy) and Gaelic (e.g. glen narrow valley, whisky). Before the sixteenth century, it was usually called 'inglis' (i.e. 'Angle-ish' - 'scottis' sometimes referred to Gaelic). From 1494 it came to be known as 'scottis' and in this, the Stewart period, it began to develop a written standard, just at the time when the East-Midland dialect of English was becoming the basis for a written standard in Tudor England. It was the vehicle for the works of the great late-medieval makars (poets) like Robert Henrysoun, William Dunbar, Gavin Douglas and David Lyndsay.

What happened to it?
After the Scottish Reformation (1560), the Union of the Crowns (1603) and the Union of the Parliaments (1707), southern English gradually became the language of most formal speech and writing and Scots came to be regarded as a 'group of dialects' rather than a 'language'. It continued, however, to be the everyday medium of communication for the vast majority of Lowland Scots, and was used creatively in poetry, song and story. It reached its pinnacle of literary achievement in this period in the work of Robert Burns.

Where is it now?
At present Scots is primarily a spoken language, with a number of regional varieties, each with a distinctive character of its own, and is heard widely in most parts of the country. Scots use a mixture of Scots and English in their speech, with some using mostly Scots and others mostly English. In this sense the language exists as part of a continuum with Scottish Standard English. You can hear people speaking Scots and using Scots words in most parts of Scotland. People have a strong emotional attachment to the language and often feel most comfortable using it amongst their friends and family.
After centuries of neglect and indeed opposition, Scots is now much more widely appreciated as an important part of Scottish culture. It has been recognised as a language under the European Charter for Regional and Minority Languages and there is an increasing awareness of its cultural and social value. In recent years there has been an explosion of writing in Scots, some of it in the writer's own distinctive dialect, and new technology has provided opportunities for Scots speakers to express themselves in their own language.
 

DerryBee

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From that great factual website…Wikipedia...:oops:...here is a definition:

Ulster Scots (or Ullans, a neologism merging "Ulster" and "Lallans") generally refers to the dialects of Scots spoken in parts of Ulster. Some definitions of Ulster Scots may also include Standard English spoken with an Ulster Scots accent.

I only know one person who actually speaks Ulster-Scots and when I once asked him to define the language/dialect he joked that Ulster-Scots is like listening to Rab C Nesbitt drunk…:lol:

(I don't mean any offence...:oops:)

I do not know if anyone ever watched Jim Shannon’s maiden speech in the House of Commons in which he spoke in Ulster-Scots. I remember watching it at the time and being midly amused when he stopped and informed the House that he would soon provide a translation. The only reason why I found his need for translation funny was because you could basically understand what he was saying anyway because it seemed as though he was speaking English with a Scottish accent but that is properely my ignorance talking. Does anyone speak Ulster-Scots here on this board? Do many people speak Ulster-Scots? I know that there is an Ulster-Scots centre of learning at the University of Ulster in Derry but I would interested in knowing the percentage of people who speak Ulster-Scots.
 

Darren H

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It's a Protestant language.

Secret so it is. So taigs can't understand us.
 


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