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Is Ulster Scots a language ?


Northtipp

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BBC - Ulster-Scots - Learn Ulster-Scots : Lesson 7, Nouns and Names

I lifted the above from another post in here . It's essentially an example of translations from Ulster Sots to the English language. On looking at this it does seem that most of the Ulster Scots words are simply either regional slants on English spoken words or quirky Ulsterisms for items or objects.

For example I note that a cinema is a Picter hoose, that an ear is a lug and that a head is a heid.

So that got me thinking ( a dangerous but thankfully infrequent thing) is the Ulster Scots actually a language? I know we have some good language intellectual's knocking around here and would lbe interested in their views.
 

IrishWelshCelt

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Yes.
/thread.
 

the secretary

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Head is 'heed'

Lots of people in Donegal right up in as far as Letterkenny used Ulster Scots terms in their everyday conversation.
There is an Ulster Scots heritage center in Donegal. There is even a monthly newspaper
 

GDPR

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Some people have said it was invented because of jealousy that the Nationalists had their own language. ;)
 
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GDPR

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Head is 'heed'

Lots of people in Donegal right up in as far as Letterkenny used Ulster Scots terms in their everyday conversation.
There is an Ulster Scots heritage center in Donegal. There is even a monthly newspaper
Gerry Adams says "Blur" instead of "Blair". Is he speaking Ulster Scots?
 

Northtipp

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Head is 'heed'

Lots of people in Donegal right up in as far as Letterkenny used Ulster Scots terms in their everyday conversation.
There is an Ulster Scots heritage center in Donegal. There is even a monthly newspaper
In that link I posted with the OP it says head is heid
 

Thac0man

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Twitter
twit taa woo
For the umpteenth time, no. Its a makey uppy cultural movement. I actually remember the UTV newspiece that first highlighted how old 'regional slang' that was being lost in parts of rural Ulster. But it was a surpise to see it emerge a couple of years later as the basis for a alleged ethnic movement dubbed 'Ulster Scots'.

With public money on offer for cultural minorties to fuel it, it has become a hokey revisionist phenomena. It is telling how many who now hold the recent tradition of Ulster Scots dear, profess to have been entirely ignorant of it before they got the glossy publically funded brochures. And why did they not know about it while they were growing up? Because it did not exist. But as a modern answer to the 'mystic celtic twilight bullsh*t' that some in the south cling too, it does what it was designed to do, regardless of the fact that it has little historical basis and ignores centruies of subsequent history.

If told by someone that they were 'Ulster Scot', I would say the same thing to them as I do to those who cry tears over their ancentral memory of the potato famine, ie. "feck off".
 
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the secretary

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Gerry Adams says "Blur" instead of "Blair". Is he speaking Ulster Scots?
No, he's speaking Belfast.
As Eire1976 said earlier, Ulster Scots is like drunk Glaswegian!
 

slippy wicket

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Newton Emerson says it is just an accent, and has lampooned Ulster Scots mercilessly.
I always thought it was a makey-uppy language, just so that the PUL could have 'their' language just as the CNR have 'Irish'.

A pox on both 'languages' I say.
 

GDPR

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For the umpteenth time, no. Its a makey uppy cultural movement. I actually remember the UTV newspiece that first highlighted how old 'regional slang' that was being lost in parts of rural Ulster. But it was a surpise to see it emerge a couple of years later as the basis for a alleged ethnic movement dubbed 'Ulster Scots'. With public money on offer to cultural minorties to fuel it, it has become a hokey revisionlist phenomena. It is telling how many who now hold the recent tradition of Ulster Scots dear, profess to have been entirely ignorant of it before they got the glossy publically funded brochures. And why did they not know about it while they were growing up? Because it did not exist. But as a modern answer to the mystic celtic twilight bullsh*t that some in the south cling too, it does what it was designed to do, regardless of the fact that it has little history basis and ignorees centruies subsequent history.
Aha. Invented for money and jealousy.

This should be written in The Annals of Ulster as a humorous aside.
 
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B

birthday

BBC - Ulster-Scots - Learn Ulster-Scots : Lesson 7, Nouns and Names

I lifted the above from another post in here . It's essentially an example of translations from Ulster Sots to the English language. On looking at this it does seem that most of the Ulster Scots words are simply either regional slants on English spoken words or quirky Ulsterisms for items or objects.




For example I note that a cinema is a Picter hoose, that an ear is a lug and that a head is a heid.

So that got me thinking ( a dangerous but thankfully infrequent thing) is the Ulster Scots actually a language? I know we have some good language intellectual's knocking around here and would lbe interested in their views.

A dialect.
 

Northtipp

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No, he's speaking Belfast.
As s
But its actually a fair point. Does It just highlight that these are regional dialect differences. I Mean Adams does say that but that's really only only from certain parts of Belfast. Those from Malone Road wouldn't say that
 

the secretary

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In that link I posted with the OP it says head is heid
Ya I know but to pronounce it just say 'heed'. I wouldn't even begin to argue about spellings, its difficult enough to get the words out!
 

picador

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I always thought it was a makey-uppy language, just so that the PUL could have 'their' language just as the CNR have 'Irish'.

A pox on both 'languages' I say.
Wow, for a total airhead you're so liberal, balanced and tolerant.
 

wombat

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It seems to be a dialect - a Ballymena accent is hard to understand but its still a form of English.
 

Mr. Bumble

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I always thought it was a makey-uppy language, just so that the PUL could have 'their' language just as the CNR have 'Irish'.

A pox on both 'languages' I say.
Irish is a language by any definition. Ulster Scots is not. Grow up.
 
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