Islands off Irish West Coast..... Use of for Wind Turbines ?

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As anybody who has travelled across the North Sea by sea or air can testify to, there are acres and acres of Wind Turbines being placed all along the sea bed.

Curious as to why Irish Government don't consider the Islands, particualrly the ones off the West coast as suitable for doing similar.

Technology for undersea transmission of power is well developed but this just seems an opportunity missed.

Some of the islands could sustain sizeable wind farms where as others only suitable for a small cluster which would be economic provided a anotehr cluster of turbines is in close proximity.
 


TheField

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Access difficulties maybe - on how many of these islands can you bring in a large boat? Lots of rocky reefs often on approaches. The turbines used now can be very large and manoeuvering/ erecting them on land requires substantial plant.

Then there'd be the visual blight.
 

Lúidín

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Also, it would require a government that is willing and able to engage in projects for the benefit of the country. The FFG party's sole purpose is to sell off assets to commercial interests and take a percentage from any private operations as per EU guidelines.
 

stopdoingstuff

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Also, it would require a government that is willing and able to engage in projects for the benefit of the country. The FFG party's sole purpose is to sell off assets to commercial interests and take a percentage from any private operations as per EU guidelines.
Yeah I would like to see a national renewable power company with the goal of making us energy independent. The EU are not really into countries being free.
 
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Access difficulties maybe - on how many of these islands can you bring in a large boat? Lots of rocky reefs often on approaches. The turbines used now can be very large and manoeuvering/ erecting them on land requires substantial plant.

Then there'd be the visual blight.
Hovercraft are designed for use in difficult terrain, these islands have beaches and boat access............... there are currently large Hovercraft mainly used for Military purposes which can carry couple of battle tanks.

Also not sure if you have been to many of the inhabited isands round the coast but many are using Landing type craft ferries that are designed to work in very shallow waters. Really a case of drop the front and drive off.

Substantial plant is already used worldwide in erecting them and building of temporary roads either using matted material removed after installation or permanent tracks cover that realitively easily.

Logistically there is nothing that is unsolveable as lets face it the guy who floated a plane from Shannon to Sligo on a towed raft showed what could be done.
 

sic transit

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Access difficulties maybe - on how many of these islands can you bring in a large boat? Lots of rocky reefs often on approaches. The turbines used now can be very large and manoeuvering/ erecting them on land requires substantial plant.

Then there'd be the visual blight.
That's a bit of a NIMBY argument TBH and until such time as things like the wave power conundrum are cracked we're stuck with the tried and tested technology.
 

GDPR

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A lot of these islands would be designated conservation areas which would present difficulties.

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TheField

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That's a bit of a NIMBY argument TBH and until such time as things like the wave power conundrum are cracked we're stuck with the tried and tested technology.
Well personally, I'd prefer to see the lead taken by the folk along the east coast and specifically Dublin. When we see wind turbines gracing the Irish sea off Dalkey, Howth and Malahide, then maybe there'd be a place for them on the western seaboard.

But there's not much chance of that, is there??? :)

Anyway, solar farms are the up and coming thing. We'll need to see a few installations before you could make up your mind on them but they are potentially much less intrusive and not noisy.
 

Volatire

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We certainly don't need any more wind power.

It has proven to be more or less useless.
 

Turbinator

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A lot of these islands would be designated conservation areas which would present difficulties.

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Indeed - plus they would do serious damage to the major seabird colonies in these areas, this is already an issue in the North Sea. Would also be destructive of the tourist industry. In any case wind farms offshore require even more subsidies then their onland equivalent which we are already paying dearly for with the 3rd highest energy bills in the EU
 

cabledude

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Access difficulties maybe - on how many of these islands can you bring in a large boat? Lots of rocky reefs often on approaches. The turbines used now can be very large and manoeuvering/ erecting them on land requires substantial plant.

Then there'd be the visual blight.
Is that not the correct way to look at it? Instead of looking at them as a blight, should they not be looked upon as a vehicle for our energy freedom?
 

Boy M5

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Is that not the correct way to look at it? Instead of looking at them as a blight, should they not be looked upon as a vehicle for our energy freedom?
Has Denis O'Brien moved into windpower?
 

Gurdiev77

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Yeah I would like to see a national renewable power company with the goal of making us energy independent. The EU are not really into countries being free.
Nothing to do with the EU. The Dail is hardly stocked with visionaries. Remind me where we're buying our sugar from these days.
 

GDPR

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Indeed - plus they would do serious damage to the major seabird colonies in these areas, this is already an issue in the North Sea. Would also be destructive of the tourist industry. In any case wind farms offshore require even more subsidies then their onland equivalent which we are already paying dearly for with the 3rd highest energy bills in the EU
It was specifically birds I was thinking of.

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Turbinator

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Is that not the correct way to look at it? Instead of looking at them as a blight, should they not be looked upon as a vehicle for our energy freedom?
Ask the Germans - 100's billions of Euros spent on them and still coal underpins their energy system
 

The Field Marshal

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access difficulties maybe - on how many of these islands can you bring in a large boat? Lots of rocky reefs often on approaches. The turbines used now can be very large and manoeuvering/ erecting them on land requires substantial plant.

Then there'd be the visual blight.
to say nothing of the danger to low flying aircraft and rescue helicopters
 


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