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It seems our fundamental right to privacy may be dissolving, right before our eyes.


Lily MacDuff

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Mar 8, 2013
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152
Does anyone care that our fundamental right to privacy may be dissolving, right before our eyes?

:confused::confused:

:shock:New Data protection regulations are currently being written, which have the power to change Europe from a place where your personal life is private and belongs to you, to a place where your every recorded detail is bought and sold by multinational corporations:shock:
And without necessarily having your knowledge or consent.

Below is a link from Avaaz.org which seems to be quite a progressive site for change. Check out this link and let me know what you think about this issue. I for one do not want my private details sold to the highest bidder!


EU Citizens: Defend Your Right to Privacy

I would love to hear what anyone thinks of this issue!:D
 
Last edited:


shiel

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Feb 14, 2011
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The first thing avaaz wants to do is get your name and e-mail. Is that not contradictory?
 

Dame_Enda

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Underlines why we need direct democracy. In theory, the politicians are supposed to represent us. In practice the lobbyists interfere with that representativeness.
 

Lily MacDuff

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The first thing avaaz wants to do is get your name and e-mail. Is that not contradictory?
HAHA Point taken, but read their privacy policy they seem fine! Anyway no-one said it needs to be your real name;)
 

Lily MacDuff

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Underlines why we need direct democracy. In theory, the politicians are supposed to represent us. In practice the lobbyists interfere with that representativeness.
Absolutely....Perhaps if we got enough steam behind that petition they might just pay attention to our cries!! Here's hoping!
 

shiel

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The right to individual privacy is a compromised one in a democracy and in the free market.

When the powerful tool of the computer is used to record all actions by individuals, collate them and sell that information to private firms the right becomes a commodity.

Similarly the right to individual freedom of expression is equally compromised when a small number of powerful individuals control the means of communication.

Individuals with opinions not in accordance with the owners of the means of communication can be excluded.
 

Mossy Heneberry

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I hope your wrong Mossy!
I wish I was but over the last few years Gardaí have been giving powers to hack into your mobile phone, email etc.

Than we have the EU, a supra-bureaucracy that in order to justify itself needs to come up with more rules, regualtions, directives etc which usually infringe on our rights, including our right to privacy.
 

Lily MacDuff

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152
The right to individual privacy is a compromised one in a democracy and in the free market.

When the powerful tool of the computer is used to record all actions by individuals, collate them and sell that information to private firms the right becomes a commodity.

Similarly the right to individual freedom of expression is equally compromised when a small number of powerful individuals control the means of communication.

Individuals with opinions not in accordance with the owners of the means of communication can be excluded.
Sure! But we should never just sit back and allow our rights to ever be compromised. Something must be done! I certainly don't want my rights to be a commodity. At what point should we say enough is enough. We've let them away with too much already!
 

Lily MacDuff

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I wish I was but over the last few years Gardaí have been giving permission to hack into your mobile phone, email etc.
Really? Who gave such permission?
Sure google have been reading my emails and advertising at me based on it's content! This is getting out of hand!
(Check out hushmail.com)
 

jmcc

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The thing to remember about free services is that if you are not paying for it, then you are the product.
 

shiel

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Sure! But we should never just sit back and allow our rights to ever be compromised. Something must be done! I certainly don't want my rights to be a commodity. At what point should we say enough is enough. We've let them away with too much already!
Look I got shirty over on another thread and started to question the rules.

All of which had me shut from discussion forthwith and forever.

One of the participants in the discussion explained the position as follows.

'It's very simple; the owners of the place have the absolute right to lay down even arbitrary rules regarding what can or can't be said.

We are guests here; we either abide by the rules laid own, or we leave.

OK, there's room to discuss and challenge them, but no way to force change against the owners' wishes.

Dem is the facts.'

So I am sorry to say our rights are commodities even on this forum and our freedom of expression is very limited.
 

Monday Monday

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Feb 9, 2009
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Underlines why we need direct democracy. In theory, the politicians are supposed to represent us. In practice the lobbyists interfere with that representativeness.
The politicians ARE the lobbyists.

Every five years, or so, they lobby the electorate on behalf of the corporations that employ them.
 

ManUnited

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Nov 16, 2009
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I'm not sure about your fundamental right to privacy online. It's a very public space and people know that when they use it. As jmcc says when you are using something for free, like reading a newspaper, then you can't complain too much.
It would be a different story if the internet was developed initially as the free love and mung beans, peoples project some think it is, and is being hijacked by corporations, but it wasn't.
Most important thing is that most of the info they want, and sell, is harmless enough. For anything you want to do privately, or secretly even, there will always be a simple work around for any type of system the powers that be impose. The music industry has found that one out. Any technology that can be designed to invade your privacy can be circumvented using that same technology.
Fight the power.
 

Mossy Heneberry

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Really? Who gave such permission?
Sure google have been reading my emails and advertising at me based on it's content! This is getting out of hand!
(Check out hushmail.com)
The government gave them permission.

JUSTICE MINISTER ALAN Shatter has said today that an “unexpected number” of gardaí accessed the PULSE computer system in relation to the arrest of Clare Daly in January for suspected drink driving
And...

Following correspondence with the Commissioner, Shatter told the Dáil that an “unexpected number of members of the garda force” accessed the PULSE computer system in relation to the incident.

He added that it is “absolutely clear that certain steps need to be taken to ensure the strict application of data protection rules with regard to the operation, usage and access to the PULSE system”.
Those Gardaí that accessed the system have probaly breached the data protection act but I can tell you now, don't expect anything to come of this.

‘Unexpected number’ of gardaí accessed information on Clare Daly arrest
 

Lily MacDuff

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Mar 8, 2013
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If you want to debate this issue, I suggest you read the European Parliament's rapporteurs report.

No point having a complex discussion based on a bullet point article.

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/meetdocs/2009_2014/documents/libe/pr/922/922387/922387en.pdf


D
Thanks for your contribution to the discussion.

Here, in kind, is the text of a petition signed by over 100 top EU academics. It very briefly and succinctly covers five of the key points, which the lobbyists have been trying to manipulate, and which these academics feel need to be safeguarded.

Data Protection in Europe
 

Lily MacDuff

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Mar 8, 2013
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I'm not sure about your fundamental right to privacy online. It's a very public space and people know that when they use it. As jmcc says when you are using something for free, like reading a newspaper, then you can't complain too much.
It would be a different story if the internet was developed initially as the free love and mung beans, peoples project some think it is, and is being hijacked by corporations, but it wasn't.
Most important thing is that most of the info they want, and sell, is harmless enough. For anything you want to do privately, or secretly even, there will always be a simple work around for any type of system the powers that be impose. The music industry has found that one out. Any technology that can be designed to invade your privacy can be circumvented using that same technology.
Fight the power.
I agree that while there are ways to protect your privacy online, such as the TOR network, it really shouldn't be entirely incumbent on the individual, given the fact that privacy is a fundamental right, as established by the EU's Charter of Fundamental Rights. Moreover, as it is a fundamental right, established by the EU, the EU has an obligation to defend that right, with all due vigilance.

Also, and this is important to note, the Data protection regulations don't just apply to online activity, they apply to all data collected about you anywhere, by any organisation, e.g. every contract you sign with a phone company, every library book you borrow, every medical test result, police records, etc. The totality of what constitutes your personal data is enormous, and this fact often seems to escape people. That's why this issue and petition is so important. :D
 

Lily MacDuff

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Mar 8, 2013
Messages
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The thing to remember about free services is that if you are not paying for it, then you are the product.
Perhaps that is the sad fact. But if my personal data has to become the commodity in order to access free services shouldn't the rules governing that data be stricter rather than more lax?
 

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