Jack Charlton Passes Away

Sync

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Jack Charlton passes away at 85 years of age. His family say it was peaceful and surrounded by them at his home in Northumberland.

A World Cup Winner with England and the Irish Manager for our breakthrough in the International scene. Tremendous defender with Leeds back in the 60s, and one of the last 1966 WC winners to pass away. A truly memorable career and man.


This was Jack back in 2015 when he was given a standing ovation by Irish and English fans at a friendly.

Jack-Charlton.jpg


“I wasn't very good at playing football. But I was very good at stopping other people playing football.”
 
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Kevin Parlon

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You posted it earlier. I'll add this to your thread:

Jack Charlton died tonight. Outside of all the nostalgia that will be rerun today, I think he looms large in our recent culture. Is he not the first beloved Englishman for those of us born after independence? And does he not then so form a notable milestone? For me he represents a totem of Ireland's emergence and identity as a country no longer in hiding or retreat from its own origins. All said and done, I think he was a good guy and would like to mark his passing. What think you?
 

Sync

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For me he represents a totem of Ireland's emergence and identity as a country no longer in hiding or retreat from its own origins.
I think that's really true. 1990 felt like a coming out party for Ireland on the grand stage as something other than a stereotypical postcard country, and having him there actually made a big difference, it did feel like we were moving on in a way from the past. And he took that semi-ambassadorial role very well.
 

Kevin Parlon

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I think that's really true. 1990 felt like a coming out party for Ireland on the grand stage as something other than a stereotypical postcard country, and having him there actually made a big difference, it did feel like we were moving on in a way from the past. And he took that semi-ambassadorial role very well.
Yes, that's exactly it. And the fact he was an Englishman made it all the more so. At the risk of over stating things, 1990 was seminal in making of the Ireland we know today. Or at least, many things that happened to be influential, occurred that year.
 

Hewson

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Very sorry to hear that. For me, more a rugby fan that a soccer fan, he embodied everything that was worthwhile in football and imparted an enthusiasm for the Irish team that just didn't exist before he became manager. Italia 1990 was the highlight, the year our pulses went into overdrive.

He was modest, straight, cranky and inspiring. Lovely man.

Rest in peace, Jack.
 

RasherHash

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Jack Charlton passes away at 85 years of age. His family say it was peaceful and surrounded by them at his home in Northumberland.

A World Cup Winner with England and the Irish Manager for our breakthrough in the International scene. Tremendous defender with Leeds back in the 60s, and one of the last 1966 WC winners to pass away. A truly memorable career and man.


This was Jack back in 2015 when he was given a standing ovation by Irish and English fans at a friendly.

View attachment 26216
Oh god, this gives rte the green light to fill in as much time as possible...and then some, with 'wonderful reminiscing' about him and his 'great team'.

Yet another excuse for them not to do their job holding the junta to account 🙄
 

Marcos the black

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RIP.
Gave us some very good memories. Was a proud part of Jack's Army.
 

shutuplaura

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What a legend. RIP.
 

de valera's' giddy goat

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He brought great days to the country. Watching some of the old games back again i'm not certain that his brand of football was any worse than Martin O'Neill's. We were always hanging around the opposition goalmouth waiting for a mistake from them to pounce on, as opposed to our own goal mouth with our own mistakes.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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Can you imagine approaching Jack Charlton at any point and letting him know he can have a laptop with software on it to assist with tactics... :) Neither can I.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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You have to admit with Mr Charlton that what he did was very simple, straightforward, every footballer no matter how thick could understand it and just stuck at it.

Lot to be said for it as the results showed. We've not had the like since.
 

borntorum

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I think that's really true. 1990 felt like a coming out party for Ireland on the grand stage as something other than a stereotypical postcard country, and having him there actually made a big difference, it did feel like we were moving on in a way from the past. And he took that semi-ambassadorial role very well.
Even though we’re a lot wealthier and more cosmopolitan now, I don’t think the country will ever be as happy and united as it was in the early 90s. They were halcyon days in many ways and Big Jack played a huge part. RIP
 

Sync

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He brought great days to the country. Watching some of the old games back again i'm not certain that his brand of football was any worse than Martin O'Neill's.
Ooooh you may be too young to remember sitting through Egypt/Ireland. It was a terrible World Cup and this was the worst game. They changed the rules on the backpass After this abomination (Ireland’s most material impact on the sport).

The moments will NEVER be topped. But the surrounding hours don’t age well. But it’s a results business. We could have tried to play like Cameroon or Germany and we'd have lost in the groups. He got results and galvanised a nation.
 
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CatullusV

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Ooooh you may be too young to remember sitting through Egypt/Ireland. It was a terrible World Cup and this was the worst game. They changed the rules on the backpass After this abomination (Ireland’s most material impact on the sport).

The moments will NEVER be topped. But the surrounding hours don’t age well. But it’s a results business. And he got them, and galvanised a nation.
That was an awful match. I was playing a game of cricket that day, and by prior arrangement the match started sufficiently early as to allow for a very extended break between innings - enough time to watch the match. At half time it was agreed that we would resume our game.

He played an awful style of football. That ireland side were dreadful to watch.

But sports are all about the final score. He brought the national side to new heights of achievement. He also energised the nation.
 

borntorum

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What really differentiates that era from nowadays was just how important the matches were.

The whole country stood still when Ireland was playing, not just in the major championships but also for the qualifying matches against England in 90 and 91, and Norn Iron in 93.

Contrast with the most recent Euros which were a fun distraction for the majority of the population but not much more. Maybe it’s healthier that way but it’s definitely a lot less fun.
 

Sync

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It was a dark time for football. All the enthusiasm caused by the Dutch in 88 was just crushed in 1990. Argentina scoring 5 goals in 7 games to reach the finals. Horrendous. We remember Cameroon, Ireland and the transcendent joy of Toto Schillaci (bastard) brought, but it was as bad as football got in my lifetime. Things bounced back really quickly though.

That 1994 world cup, with Italy and Brazil being at their best, and our Jack and Aldridge there, fighting about water. And that Houghton goal.


25 years later: I still don't know what Pagliuca was doing.
 


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