Jack Charlton Passes Away

CatullusV

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Pity he played for Man U. :LOL:
Absolutely.I have supported the 'Pool for fifty years. At least by playing at Man U Irwin got the opportunity to show his quality repeatedly at the top level. He was a class act and he did it all without any apparent fuss. He was ten times the player McCarthy was. He did it on both sides of the pitch as well. A shy hero. He just went out and did it again and again;. Ferguson loved his bones.

OK, he had less of the bluster and the aggression of McCarthy, but he was surgical.
 


Round tower

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Absolutely.I have supported the 'Pool for fifty years. At least by playing at Man U Irwin got the opportunity to show his quality repeatedly at the top level. He was a class act and he did it all without any apparent fuss. He was ten times the player McCarthy was. He did it on both sides of the pitch as well. A shy hero. He just went out and did it again and again;. Ferguson loved his bones.

OK, he had less of the bluster and the aggression of McCarthy, but he was surgical.
Most people would put Deni in the top 2 left backs in the PL history
 

CatullusV

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Most people would put Deni in the top 2 left backs in the PL history
I would hold him at that level of esteem. He was a magnificent player. I remember in one PL match Keane putting his foot on the ball and turning to berate Irwin because he hadn't joined the attack quickly enough in Keane's view. Irwin was superb going forward and was very much key to the shape of Man U. His transfer fee of £625k looks derisory given his service. What would he be worth now at a similar stage of his career?
 

hiding behind a poster

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There's a great obituary in today's London Times. His childhood was so poor his mother couldn't afford him football shorts so made a pair for him out of an old curtain.
Compare that to the definition of "poverty" today.
 

hiding behind a poster

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The fact that Jack was English eased so many aspects of our attitudes to each other and he seemed to have the perfect intellect and personality to play that role.
In a strange way, Jack simultaneously became Ireland's favourite Englishman and England's favourite Irishman.
 

wombat

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Compare that to the definition of "poverty" today.
Its interesting how it has changed. When I was in primary school, poor kids had shabby clothes, were pale and skinny with snotty noses. Today, poor kids tend to have brand name clothes and are fat.
 

hiding behind a poster

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I know that, and it is rather strange that keepers these days wear all manner of neon colours. When I was playing keepers wore green. There was an element of sense to that. It provided a tiny amount of camouflage, particularly as one picked up mud on a wet pitch. It is all about the one percenters in very swiftly-developing situations. The first time I went to Elverys to buy a shirt I was given the default green. If the attacker has to take even as a little as a micro-second to locate the keeper then that is a good thing.
Peter Schmeichel started the move towards gaudy multi-coloured keepers' jerseys. His logic was that the jersey was so noticeable that a) strikers became much more aware of the keeper rather than the spaces available to shoot into, and b) by being almost forced to look at the keeper because of the shirt, they'd then instinctively hit the ball where they were looking - i.e straight at him.
 

Buchaill Dana

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In a strange way, Jack simultaneously became Ireland's favourite Englishman and England's favourite Irishman.
Is that why the Sun called him a traitor, he took dogs abuse in the street and was targeted by C18?
 

Buchaill Dana

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I don't agree. Anyone who was in underage football and was good enough came through on schedule, just look at Robbie Keane, Duff, Dunne, Given etc, all of whom were in the underage setup while Charlton was around. And the success he brought greatly increased the numbers playing, which deepened the pool at underage level.
Name one player Jack promoted from the underage setup?

He did a lot of good things, but nurturing youth was not one of them. You got in on the basis of club football, preferably English club football, only.
 

CatullusV

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Peter Schmeichel started the move towards gaudy multi-coloured keepers' jerseys. His logic was that the jersey was so noticeable that a) strikers became much more aware of the keeper rather than the spaces available to shoot into, and b) by being almost forced to look at the keeper because of the shirt, they'd then instinctively hit the ball where they were looking - i.e straight at him.
My playing days were odd. I grew up quickly and reached my current height by around the age of twelve. I was so much taller than my teammates that I was ushered into goal. Once I stopped growing and others caught up with me I moved outfield. Centre forward. I was a one trick pony. I was very quick across the ground and quick to read a situation. I lacked a lot of other things. I wasn't very physical and could be easily shouldered off the ball. It was all about speed and reading. I scored a hell of a lot of goals. I had the benefit in school of two wingers who went on to play League of Ireland. There was an alchemy. They both knew how to find a space for me behind the defence.

Schmeichel was a very interesting goalie. It was obvious that he had studied other sports. His star jump came directly from Olympic Handball. He selected practices used elsewhere. However, I don't think that the neon idea is good. When I was running onto a pass and things were happening at pace, the main thing I needed to know was where the 'keeper was, and - by extension - where he wasn(t. I needed to know whether he was preparing to close me down or stand his ground. I needed to know his position and whether he was offering one side of the goal. All data was gratefully received.
 

Sync

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I was just going to link to it. Really sweet. Squires is excellent.
 

Buchaill Dana

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Staunton possibly, Irwin, Roy Keane, Gary kelly, Jeff Kenna, Kennedy, Quinn,
Irwin and Kenna were 25 on their debut. Quinn and Kelly 20. Keane, Staunton Kennedy 19.

All were established top flight players, so I think you missed my point. Nobodt got bumped from the underage structure on the basis of their performance there.
 

The OD

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Oh god, this gives rte the green light to fill in as much time as possible...and then some, with 'wonderful reminiscing' about him and his 'great team'.

Yet another excuse for them not to do their job holding the junta to account 🙄

Jack Charlton wasn't just a football manager. He was a symbol of some of the big changes Ireland went on to experience as a nation and in some ways could even have been said to be the herald of what was to come, inadvertently perhaps but still. That we could welcome one of the 'old enemy*' as our own and even make him an honorary Irish person spoke volumes. Everybody loved big Jack. Down to earth and normal sometimes, large, looming, aggressive and outspoken as well.

Met the guy once, some character. He was giving a talk at a local football club in the 90s and he had this wonderful blend of cranky and charisma about him and gave us some laughs. He'd bark at people in a way that they took no offence to it and could take the odd snark back with a devious grin. I liked him, as a person.

So by all means, throw yet another little strop, nobody cares.

*(I mean this in soccer terms, because to this day, no matter how good Anglo-Irish relations get, we'll never get sick of any opportunity to stick it to them, sports wise.... ;))
 

NYCKY

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A nice gesture here from the An Post and the Royal Mail.

Jack Charlton to be commemorated through special postmark

To commemorate his contribution to both nations An Post and the Royal Mail have collaborated for the first time to create a postmark in his honour.

The postmark, which reads “Jack Charlton, 1935 — 2020”, will be applied across stamped mail posted in England and the Republic of Ireland from Monday until August 9th.
Also nice to see his beloved Leeds back in the Premier League after a long absence.
 

The OD

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