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JFK Visit to Ireland 50 Years on 27th June.


Rural

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In his speech at the quayside in New Ross the President told onlookers:


When my great-grandfather left here to become a cooper in East Boston he carried nothing with him except two things – a strong religious faith and a strong desire for liberty. I am glad to say that all of his grandchildren have valued that inheritance.
He was the youngest elected US President and there was some controversy attached to the Kennedy family over the years, but I still visit neighbours here with photographs of his visit to Ireland in their parlours and the JFK Park is a wonderful monument to him. I was just a baby when he visited, but his visit seemed to make Irish natives happy.

JFK visits Ireland — History.com This Day in History — 6/27/1963

List of Presidents of the United States by age - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Here he is with some of his Irish relations.

 


NewGoldDream

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My mother was talking about the Kennedy trip recently and told me that Kennedy's own secretary said JFK was happier in Ireland than he had ever been in his political life.

All I could think of was Toxic Avenger and our pathetic need for attention and approval...but I smiled and agreed...
 

Rural

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That pathetic need is a human failing in most of us.
 
D

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My mother was talking about the Kennedy trip recently and told me that Kennedy's own secretary said JFK was happier in Ireland than he had ever been in his political life.

All I could think of was Toxic Avenger and our pathetic need for attention and approval...but I smiled and agreed...
I'm afraid I must confess to remembering the visit fairly clearly. And most of the comments I recall from my elders and betters concentrated more on his Catholicism than his Irish origins. In fact, it now makes me wonder were we more catholic than Irish - or were the two simply inseparable. Very different times.
 

jmcc

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Wonder if Ryan Turgid's book will be reissued?
 

eoghanacht

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Who?

Not relevant folks.
 

NYCKY

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Later on this year will also see the 50th anniversary of his assassination.

I remember reading something about Caroline Kennedy coming to Wexford for the anniversary of the visit. She is under consideration to be ambassador to Japan so may not be able to make it.
 

Rural

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Clinton also felt comfortable here in Ireland, we do the auld hurrah job brilliantly here. but the Marilyn Munroe thang was a bit of a saga.
 

gatsbygirl20

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We (that dreaded "we" again) were actually in need of approval at that time

We were just starting to slowly emerge from the cold winter of the newly independent state.

Down in the West of Ireland the most common mode of transport was bicycle or donkey and cart. Emigration was still taking its toll, as the green shoots did not effect the rural West for another few years...

Education beyond primary level was for those who had money, and not many people had money

But there was something in the wind, something at last like hope...

Then Kennedy arrived, tanned and impossibly movie-star handsome, the first Catholic Irish President of the United States whose ancestors had been poor emigrants like we still were--and he gave us a new and hopeful and romantic vision of ourselves, quoting Yeats and Wilde and Shaw...

We went wild with happiness, hope and innocent delight...

That Kennedy was a womaniser, a bit of a spoofer, that he was more familiar with the English aristocracy than the peasant Irish, having lived among them and having had a sister married to the Duke of Devonshire....

We knew little of that, or cared. We were proud of our prodigal son who had made good, and we wanted to party

That Kennedy had a wonderful time with us in 1963, is unquestioned by even his most cynical biographers

His wife, Jacqueline--a snob and no lover of the peasantry--spoke movingly after his death of how he regaled her excitedly with stories about his trip, what a wonderful experience it was for him

He never stopped telling her about the beautiful green uniforms and impressive formation of the young Irish Cadets at the Garden of Remembrance ceremonies

For the funeral in Washington, she insisted that the Irish cadets be present at Kennedy's graveside in Arlington, recalling those few happy and carefree days he had spent in Ireland

It was great. I was a kid, but I remember it....
 

greengoose2

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We (that dreaded "we" again) were actually in need of approval at that time

We were just starting to slowly emerge from the cold winter of the newly independent state.

Down in the West of Ireland the most common mode of transport was bicycle or donkey and cart. Emigration was still taking its toll, as the green shoots did not effect the rural West for another few years...

Education beyond primary level was for those who had money, and not many people had money

But there was something in the wind, something at last like hope...

Then Kennedy arrived, tanned and impossibly movie-star handsome, the first Catholic Irish President of the United States whose ancestors had been poor emigrants like we still were--and he gave us a new and hopeful and romantic vision of ourselves, quoting Yeats and Wilde and Shaw...

We went wild with happiness, hope and innocent delight...

That Kennedy was a womaniser, a bit of a spoofer, that he was more familiar with the English aristocracy than the peasant Irish, having lived among them and having had a sister married to the Duke of Devonshire....

We knew little of that, or cared. We were proud of our prodigal son who had made good, and we wanted to party

That Kennedy had a wonderful time with us in 1963, is unquestioned by even his most cynical biographers

His wife, Jacqueline--a snob and no lover of the peasantry--spoke movingly after his death of how he regaled her excitedly with stories about his trip, what a wonderful experience it was for him

He never stopped telling her about the beautiful green uniforms and impressive formation of the young Irish Cadets at the Garden of Remembrance ceremonies

For the funeral in Washington, she insisted that the Irish cadets be present at Kennedy's graveside in Arlington, recalling those few happy and carefree days he had spent in Ireland

It was great. I was a kid, but I remember it....
Musha, shure God love ya!
 

gatsbygirl20

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Musha, shure God love ya!
:D That is exactly how the people spoke back then...(well, not exactly. With "musha" they'd have dropped the "shure")

But that's the way it was...

Of course you'll have posts "Although I was just out of the womb, I knew what that Kennedy scumbag was up to, and I tried to warn people, but would they listen...etc"

Kennedy's womanising and other shenanigans did not come into the public domain until the 70s

He was an extraordinarily popular president, and almost everyone in Ireland was wild with excitement

There were not many occasions on which one had the opportunity to go wild with excitement in those rather grim times....
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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I'm too young for this thread :p
 
D

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:D That is exactly how the people spoke back then...(well, not exactly. With "musha" they'd have dropped the "shure")

But that's the way it was...

Of course you'll have posts "Although I was just out of the womb, I knew what that Kennedy scumbag was up to, and I tried to warn people, but would they listen...etc"

Kennedy's womanising and other shenanigans did not come into the public domain until the 70s

He was an extraordinarily popular president, and almost everyone in Ireland was wild with excitement

There were not many occasions on which one had the opportunity to go wild with excitement in those rather grim times....
And do ya remember the pictures decorating the walls of half the houses in the country for years after, John XXIII in one and JFK and Jackie - the perfect, happily married couple - in the other?
 
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Didn't he have Irish soldiers carrying his coffin? Maybe that was a result of a promise made to the troops of the latest country he visited...
 
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I was 17 months old when he visited.
I might actually have been something a little bit more than a glint in my father's eye.

I've just done the counting off fingers thing and I reckon I was comfortably in position at the time.
 

Rural

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He was a womaniser, but, then so was Clinton who was also adored by the Irish.
 

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