Job creation policies - Ideas

hammer

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Jul 6, 2009
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58,180
Most of us understand that we need to get people back to work.

Every job lost costs the exchequer €20,000 + has a severe depressionary effect on the person.

Some ideas
Employers PRSI exemption for 2 years for each new employee.

A grant of €50 per week per new employee. Job maintained for 2 years. Anco in the 80s

Scrap the travel tax

Cut corporation tax to 10%

Allow business entertainment as an allowable tax expenses until 2014

Make FAS properties etc. rent free to new entrepeneurs for 2 year period

Social welfare available to those entrepeneurs that fail.

Bankruptcy rules changed to 3 year period

Reduce commercial rates by 10%

Reduce electricity prices

100% capital allowances for new equipment, computers etc........

No vat chargeable business to business ( where both registered for Vat )

Minimum wage exempt from employers PRSI if it is not going to be reduced in line with EU average
 


Cael

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Jun 19, 2006
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13,304
How about nationalising the land and vital industries, would that not be the most obvious way to go...turn low paid temp work into permanent full time work, with democratic control over the means of production.
 

Simon.D

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Sep 5, 2005
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797
Firstly we need to make people want to work.... The dole isn't that bad a place to be at the moment (assuming you're not paying a massive mortgage), and alot of people in this country won't work for the wages being offered to them (i.e. minimum wage), and instead prefer to do the odd bit of black market labour supplemented by their welfare allowance plus benefits... Many are simply choosing not to work...

Either life on the minimum wage needs to be improved, i.e. by letting people keep many of their welfare benefits..

Or Life on the dole needs to be made worse, either by Cutting welfare, or making recipients work for it on the minimum wage rate: i.e. weave wicker baskets for the tourists, dig holes for the county council, pull shopping trolleys from the liffey, or quarry stone for our roads with a pick axe , (This would also help to reduce our carbon footprint!).. Our state currently employs hundreds of thousands of people to sit at home an play playstation... Surely we could find something more useful for them to do...

A combination of both carrot and stick would be the best way forward me thinks..
 

Hazlitt

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Feb 3, 2009
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1,076
Abolish the price floor on wages immediately.
Reduce to nil the subsidising of unemployment.
Reduce corporation and income taxes (preferably abolish).
Abolish disincentives for saving and investment (e.g. DIRT tax).
Abolish market interference in the interest rate which signals when to save and when to invest.
Stop borrowing immediately.
Blowtorch the red-tape and bureaucracy which is an obstacle for business start-ups.
 

johnfás

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Feb 22, 2007
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2,715
Cut the salaries for entry level graduate jobs in the public sector (eg the health service etc). There is a clear worry in respect of salary cutting for those already established in the sector due to the weight of mortgage and other debt that such people are holding, particularly when we own the banks they owe the money to.

However, young graduates, who are leaving the country in their droves, have benefitted from free third level education and are unlikely to have any property related debt. They are also living in an environment of reduced prices. These people are existing in an entirely different economic situation to other people in the market. We should cut their salaries accordingly, but not do it to simply save money, but to employ more people. The more of these people who leave the harder it will be for us to effect any form of economic recovery.

It is a fact that entry level jobs in the UK in fields such as nursing and speech and language therapy pay approximately two-thirds of the salaries which we pay, quite unnecessarily, to similar graduates. If we cut the salary to UK level we could then employ a third more frontline staff in these crucial areas. It would also have an extremely beneficial effect on consumption tax rates, on which we are so dependent, although admittedly it would have a minor effect on income tax receipts.
 

bokuden

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Sep 23, 2010
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11,250
Invest heavily in a large scale seafood production project all along the west coast. Get investors from Asia to stump up and export HIGH QUALITY seafood to the far east.
Encourage Irish people to eat and appreciate seafood. It would improve the population's general health.
 
Last edited:

Cassandra Syndrome

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Aug 23, 2009
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16,885
Abolish the price floor on wages immediately.
Reduce to nil the subsidising of unemployment.
Reduce corporation and income taxes (preferably abolish).
Abolish disincentives for saving and investment (e.g. DIRT tax).
Abolish market interference in the interest rate which signals when to save and when to invest.
Stop borrowing immediately.
Blowtorch the red-tape and bureaucracy which is an obstacle for business start-ups.
+1

At the moment we can see some sort of invisible hand (excuse the oxymoron) working as the increase in food commodity prices has encouraged people to move into the agriculture and horticulture sectors. Also enrolment in courses for these sectors has surged, which is even better as that sector needs new ideas and innovations after being ruined from EU subsidies for the past 40 years.

This is all happening naturally, as the State is investing in a "smart economy" which is complete drivel. We are a fecking big island with excellent land and a small density of population FFS!

I think this is the first time in nearly 50 years that employment has increased in the agriculture sector.
 

wombat

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Jun 16, 2007
Messages
33,002
This is all happening naturally, as the State is investing in a "smart economy" which is complete drivel. We are a fecking big island with excellent land and a small density of population FFS!

I think this is the first time in nearly 50 years that employment has increased in the agriculture sector.
Interesting that agriculture is one of the mainstays of the U.S. economy - doesn't stop them having a high tech sector either;)
 

revolution

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Nov 13, 2009
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start fixing our leaking water infrastructure in a ce scheme.
have 2 engineers per 10 general operatives for overseeing work.
its very labour intensive,just what is needed.
pay 100eur more than welfare rates with mandatory 3 day week
 

eoghanacht

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Apr 18, 2006
Messages
32,410
Firstly we need to make people want to work.... The dole isn't that bad a place to be at the moment (assuming you're not paying a massive mortgage), and alot of people in this country won't work for the wages being offered to them (i.e. minimum wage), and instead prefer to do the odd bit of black market labour supplemented by their welfare allowance plus benefits... Many are simply choosing not to work...

Either life on the minimum wage needs to be improved, i.e. by letting people keep many of their welfare benefits..

Or Life on the dole needs to be made worse, either by Cutting welfare, or making recipients work for it on the minimum wage rate: i.e. weave wicker baskets for the tourists, dig holes for the county council, pull shopping trolleys from the liffey, or quarry stone for our roads with a pick axe , (This would also help to reduce our carbon footprint!).. Our state currently employs hundreds of thousands of people to sit at home an play playstation... Surely we could find something more useful for them to do...

A combination of both carrot and stick would be the best way forward me thinks..

Oh here we go lazy so and so's sitting on their arses playing games consoles who won't work (nevermind the non-existant jobs) thats the problems.

Straight out of the Norman 'Get on yer bike' Tebitt school of thinking!!

If basket making and digging holes is the best you can come up with then have you thought of applying to join FF
 

Slippers 2

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Nov 12, 2009
Messages
22
Minimum wage jobs:

Job Guarantees and social democracy

Today is my last day in London and I am tied up all day with meetings and activities and then later I am travelling back to Australia. So I invoked the guest blogger facility and asked Victor Quirk to share his views on employment guarantees. Victor has just finished a doctoral dissertation and has produced one of the most compelling research efforts I have had the pleasure to supervise. He chose a very challenging topic overall – the political constraints on full employment – and compiled a very rich argument based on a substantial interrogation of an extensive array of primary documents which he sourced from various national archives in Australia, Britain and the US. Now that Victor has finished his work I hope he will share more of it as a guest blogger. So … over to Victor.

Full employment and price stability

For those who have come in late, what the instigator of this blog, Professor of Economics at the University of Newcastle, Australia, Bill Mitchell, and his numerous colleagues around the world, have consistently and convincingly argued and demonstrated for more than a decade, is that full employment and price stability are completely feasible. Not by calling six or eight per cent unemployment ‘full employment’, but by actually eliminating all but frictional unemployment (two percent).

According to their ‘Modern Monetary Theory’ (MMT) – governments which have sovereignty over their currencies and floating exchange rates have no fiscal constraint, i.e., no shortage of money, nothing to prevent them from mobilising their nation’s unutilised productive resources, such as unemployed people, and giving them socially beneficial work to perform.

They argue that this means that governments such as the USA, Australia, Canada, India, … in fact most independent nations except members of the European Monetary Union, have the capacity to finance an expanding / contracting buffer stock of jobs to augment the contracting and expanding demand for labour in the existing labour market. This would provide paid employment to anyone who at anytime wanted a job.

Bill and his colleagues propose that these jobs be designed to entail useful work that meets a social or environmental need that is currently unmet by the public or private sectors.

The issue of wage inflation would be avoided in three ways.

Firstly, by paying only the minimum wage, which in Australia is sufficient to maintain a modest dignified existence, people in these jobs would retain an economic incentive to work in the conventional labour market when an opportunity arose. Employers would need pay little more than they presently offer to poach workers from the buffer stock employment pool, since the ‘Job Guarantee’ system would make no counter-bid to retain them. By ensuring easy re-entry to the Job Guarantee, there would also be no risk in taking short term temporary work. By keeping the JG system as flexible as possible, patchy mainstream employment opportunities could be accommodated without impairing the economic security of the workers involved.

Secondly, while in this pool, workers could be kept in a more productive condition than they would if left unemployed. With useful work to do, preserving their mental and physical stamina, preserving their social and communication skills, and with ample opportunities for developing their vocational skills, the potential productivity of these workers could even be extended.

Thirdly, by enabling them to pay their bills, maintain their families and preserve their social supports and social integration, the otherwise unemployed (and otherwise socially isolated) would preserve their word-of-mouth connection to the job market. By integrating the public employment service with the Job Guarantee system they could also be kept informed of job vacancies as they arose (in real time), on the job. Employers could even meet prospective workers on the job to gain a clearer sense of their skills. The Job Guarantee (the buffer stock of jobs) would effectively be an employer that encourages the poaching of its skilled workers.

Through a well-designed system, that integrated a flexible pool of public sector minimum wage jobs with vocational training and rehabilitation institutions, and regional labour market analysis and strategic planning, the productive capacity of the workforce could be constantly developed, maximising national competitive advantage in a race to the top, not the bottom. By thus enhancing the efficiency of the labour market, the enhanced economic security of workers (that would tend to empower them to make greater demands in the lower levels of the labour market) would be offset (from the employers’ point of view) by an increased supply (both quantitatively and qualitatively) of available productive workers.

As for the social benefits of using all willing labour, these hardly need explaining. People routinely excluded from employment because of disability, or other forms of entrenched discrimination, can be accommodated with tailor-made jobs, if need be, that can be progressively modified as a rehabilitation program, while providing the worker with the dignity and economic security of steady, paid employment. The same system could also provide vocational experience opportunities for higher education and technical college students. To the extent that people would require attendant carers and other supports to participate in the workforce, these otherwise non-existent jobs could be filled by other Job Guarantee workers.

The sorts of institutional arrangements to do all this, and develop the nation’s skills base along the way, while building a fairer, healthier, more cohesive and sustainable society (using all the labour power we otherwise fail to utilise), have been proposed in detail and can be found in free downloadable publications from the CofFEE website.

And while we here in Newcastle have focused on Australia as the context for our designs of such systems, people in other countries with a grasp of the underlying economics can develop plans better adapted to their own existing institutional arrangements.

Continued...
 

Harmonica

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Jul 2, 2009
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5,797
The state needs to reduce the price of its services to make us more competitive as a nation. Unlike the private sector too many publically provided services have not reduced in price.

Hiring new employees should be tax deductable in the same way as investing in new equipment.

Deregulate transport in Dublin to allow private operators provides new services. Dublin Bus are reducing their servicing while at the same time the state prevents any one else competing.
 

MauriceColgan

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Jul 8, 2008
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www.irelandtoo.com
Finance more tourist generating films like The Quiet Man and Ryans Daughter.

What a set Newgrange would make!

We have lots more very beautiful scenic areas to offer....a film for every county in good weather only. :)

Let's sell Ireland by keeping it!
 


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