John Berger RIP

statsman

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Hard to believe that there isn't a thread on this already. John Berger, poet, novelist, artist, essayist and one of the most significant British political thinkers of recent times died yesterday. A Booker winner, his seminal 1972 TV series and book Ways of Seeing set art in a social/political context, sometimes to the detriment of any discussion of art as art. The book is still used as a set text on many university courses.

His later writings saw him pull back somewhat from dogmatic Marxism and he became a chronicler in fiction of French peasant life. His last book, Confabulations, is a collection of what he called 'notes' on art, politics and language, and I highly recommend it.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/jan/02/john-berger-obituary

"The poverty of our century is unlike that of any other. It is not, as poverty was before, the result of natural scarcity, but of a set of priorities imposed upon the rest of the world by the rich. Consequently, the modern poor are not pitied... but written off as trash. The twentieth-century consumer economy has produced the first culture for which a beggar is a reminder of nothing."
John Berger (1991
 


RasherHash

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Omg, noooo, don't tell me 2017 is going to be a disaster like 2016 with all the wonderful celebs dying by the truckload?

Somebody should do something, while there's still time :)
 

RasherHash

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Hard to believe that there isn't a thread on this already. John Berger, poet, novelist, artist, essayist and one of the most significant British political thinkers of recent times died yesterday. A Booker winner, his seminal 1972 TV series and book Ways of Seeing set art in a social/political context, sometimes to the detriment of any discussion of art as art. The book is still used as a set text on many university courses.

His later writings saw him pull back somewhat from dogmatic Marxism and he became a chronicler in fiction of French peasant life. His last book, Confabulations, is a collection of what he called 'notes' on art, politics and language, and I highly recommend it.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/jan/02/john-berger-obituary
Marxism was much more acceptable then as a philosophy, today society is far more rightwing than it was and so you have a greater gap between rich and poor.
 

Roisin3

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Hard to believe that there isn't a thread on this already. John Berger, poet, novelist, artist, essayist and one of the most significant British political thinkers of recent times died yesterday. A Booker winner, his seminal 1972 TV series and book Ways of Seeing set art in a social/political context, sometimes to the detriment of any discussion of art as art. The book is still used as a set text on many university courses.

His later writings saw him pull back somewhat from dogmatic Marxism and he became a chronicler in fiction of French peasant life. His last book, Confabulations, is a collection of what he called 'notes' on art, politics and language, and I highly recommend it.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/jan/02/john-berger-obituary
It's an excellent point he made about the poverty today, in a world of abundance, and the trashing of the unemployed/poor.
 

GDPR

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Marxism was much more acceptable then as a philosophy, today society is far more rightwing than it was and so you have a greater gap between rich and poor.
Economically it has swung sharply to the Right but Culturally it has moved to Ultra-Left insanity; I see the two things as connected. As I said before Taigh was brilliant at showing the connection between support for nihilistic Libtardism and people seeking to line their pockets out of short term greed and to hell with the long term consequences. Anyway Ways of Seeing is an absolutely superb book.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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RIP

A man’s death makes everything certain about him. Of course, secrets may die with him. And of course, a hundred years later somebody looking through some papers may discover a fact which throws a totally different light on his life and of which all the people who attended his funeral were ignorant. Death changes the facts qualitatively but not quantitatively. One does not know more facts about a man because he is dead. But what one already knows hardens and becomes definite. We cannot hope for ambiguities to be clarified, we cannot hope for further change, we cannot hope for more. We are now the protagonists and we have to make up our minds.”
GRID - Gender Research Institute at Dartmouth (GRID)
Times of Crisis - John Berger and Noam Chomsky (4/22/14)

Exclusive material from writer, artist, critic John Berger and a virtual response and conversation with Noam Chomsky, Professor Emeritus of Linguistics and Philosophy at MIT. This event took place at Dartmouth College as part of GRID's 2014 Spring Public Lecture Series: Times of Crisis
Link
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qCaW1_4LBQ
 

derryman

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It's an excellent point he made about the poverty today, in a world of abundance, and the trashing of the unemployed/poor.
So which era in history do you think the poor were better cared for. I can't think of any other that had welfare systems and as many active charities?
I would agree though that there is a greater gap now.
 

statsman

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So which era in history do you think the poor were better cared for. I can't think of any other that had welfare systems and as many active charities?
I would agree though that there is a greater gap now.
Which is to miss the point. It's the source of the poverty he's talking about, not its remediation. Poverty amid plenty is the issue; I'd argue that this was also the case in Victorian Britain.
 

derryman

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Which is to miss the point. It's the source of the poverty he's talking about, not its remediation. Poverty amid plenty is the issue; I'd argue that this was also the case in Victorian Britain.
Yes when I thought a little more I seen what he meant. I think it could be a very good separate thread.
 

Zapped(CAPITALISMROTS)

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Berger was an exceptional communicator and a decent old Marxist, who never wavered from a philosophy of fair-minded,genuine respect for the working class. R.I.P
 

General Urko

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John Berger RIP!
I had to do his most famous book as part of a 3ed level course, I was doing, it was really thought provoking!
 

*EPIC SUCCESS*

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Not familiar with him or his works but based on some posts on here it would appear we have lost a good one.

So RIP Mr Berger, sorry I wasn't aware of you when you were alive.
 

McTell

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No
Marxism was much more acceptable then as a philosophy, today society is far more rightwing than it was and so you have a greater gap between rich and poor.

No, marxism is much worse

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/may/21/fidel-castro-lived-like-king-cuba

When Forbes starts asking questions about the wealth of Angola’s ruling family … – Africa is a Country

Heirs of Communist China's Eight Immortals 'have amassed huge wealth' - Telegraph


Marx wrote the how-to book, you see, and the clue is in the name: Capital.
 


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