John Bruton urges "forgiveness" for those who destroyed the economy

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I wish Kenny had made sh1t of him, Sailor. As I heard it, Kenny didn't push him on anything. He asked the initial question and then let Bruton bluster some nonsense...there was little follow. Needless to say, there was no mention of Bruton's pension, even when Bruton was pontificating about how we are borrowing too much.

This interview sounded like too very well off men, discussing something they no nothing about - financial suffering.

To be honest, it was bloody sickening listening to the two of them.
He didn't push him hard enough - in fact he seemed to be wearily going through the routine and sounded a bit exasperated by the end.
 


VHF

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F.G.s only hope is to move away from Bruton, Dukes, etc. with their inflated pensions and egos, learn from Obama, move to represent middle and lower income families and not fat leeches who are robbing us, we got rid of Manor Lords and replaced them with these self serving Scum.
Now you have it.
 

gatsbygirl20

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I suspect Justice Charlton may be facing a mansion tax of his own. Mind you you do have a point - I daresay thoughts of his neighbour do lighten his burdens a wee bit now and then, if he's human.
Who said (it can't have been Oscar) that there is no man so noble that he does not feel an initial frisson of joy at the news that his neighbour's house has burned down.?

There is a certain amount of that wafting round the edges of all these debates...
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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I really like "Allied Irish Bastards" - the phrase, I mean, not the Bank. It perfectly reflects my experience of them over several decades.
Before statsman gets there on my behalf, may I just say that I wholeheartedly agree with you! :)
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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I suppose Kenny didn't want to get personal, by mentioning the pension. It would look tacky and tabloid, I suppose. Then too, he might be afraid his own substantial salary might get thrown at him....
There is nothing tacky or tabloid about pressing a retired politician, who has a well paying private sector job and who is preaching further austerity and pay-cuts, on how he can justify the massive pension he is in receipt of from the public coffers.
 

sport02

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John Bruton should note his pension of 138,000 euro per annum is nearly twice the salary of CURRENT PM Rajoy of Spain..

And talking of pensions, John Bruton should also realise that total income tax take from public service equals cost of public service pensions.
 

H.R. Haldeman

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John Bruton should note his pension of 138,000 euro per annum is nearly twice the salary of CURRENT PM Rajoy of Spain..

Absolutely staggering.

It also means there are county managers, union leaders, CEO's of obscure quango's and ministerial advisers earning in the ballpark of 2x the Spanish PM's salary. County librarians in Ireland earn more than the Spanish PM.

My brain genuinely struggles to process this.
 

irishpancake

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Sailor said:
I switched from them to the Ba$tards of Ireland a few years back - they're even worse. The local manager took grave offence when, at the height of the bust, I asked him if my deposits were safe - he refused to discuss the matter.
Refused to discuss it?? Seriously!!!

What about if you had filled out a withdrawal slip in his/her presence??
 

gatsbygirl20

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There is nothing tacky or tabloid about pressing a retired politician, who has a well paying private sector job and who is preaching further austerity and pay-cuts, on how he can justify the massive pension he is in receipt of from the public coffers.
I know. But it is not a route interviewers go down. It is seen as too personal. There is no way to justify the pension--or indeed the gouging and profiteering of many who preach austerity to the rest of us over the airways.

But they would all get into a mighty huff if you start getting personal (and it IS personal, in a contradictory sort of way, even when the taxpayer is funding the pension)

When Marian Finucane was interviewing Seanie and his cohorts during the boom, and they were telling her how workers need to be more "competitive" (ie. earn less) and how the minimum wage was an awful problem altogether, I wanted her to ask the obvious question, but knew it would not happen....

Even Vinnie backs off from it. Except with that little group of politician-masochists who love to be whipped by Vinnie because it gives them an illicit thrill...
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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I know. But it is not a route interviewers go down. It is seen as too personal. There is no way to justify the pension--or indeed the gouging and profiteering of many who preach austerity to the rest of us over the airways.

But they would all get into a mighty huff if you start getting personal (and it IS personal, in a contradictory sort of way, even when the taxpayer is funding the pension)

When Marian Finucane was interviewing Seanie and his cohorts during the boom, and they were telling her how workers need to be more "competitive" (ie. earn less) and how the minimum wage was an awful problem altogether, I wanted her to ask the obvious question, but knew it would not happen....

Even Vinnie backs off from it. Except with that little group of politician-masochists who love to be whipped by Vinnie because it gives them an illicit thrill...
The moment Bruton said we are spending too much as a nation and that we need to cut back on the amount the nation is borrowing to fund that spending, his pension became fair game for discussion.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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And talking of pensions, John Bruton should also realise that total income tax take from public service equals cost of public service pensions.
I am assuming that the above is a repeat of what Eddie Hobbs claimed on the PK show this morning. If so, I think it should come with a health warning. I'm not saying it is wrong, but I wouldn't quote it as gospel either.
 

gatsbygirl20

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I am assuming that the above is a repeat of what Eddie Hobbs claimed on the PK show this morning. If so, I think it should come with a health warning. I'm not saying it is wrong, but I wouldn't quote it as gospel either.
I thought the same. Something very strange about that statistic from the Hobbit. Unless this year had a spike in pensions because of the extra retirements in February...
 
D

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I thought the same. Something very strange about that statistic from the Hobbit. Unless this year had a spike in pensions because of the extra retirements in February...
Was he referring to some actuarily calculated cost as opposed to the actual cost of funding from current revenue?
 

retep

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It was par for the course for Kenny's interviews of people even he might consider his 'betters'. They invariably get an easy ride with none of the probing, aggressive questioning spokespeople from, for example, Sinn Fein, can expect.

Kenny lost his interviewing skills years ago. I think his stint on the Late Late Show killed off whatever of it was left.
I think that's a bit unfair actually. Whatever personal criticisms and gripes people choose to level at Pat Kenny, he is a very intelligent man capable of very insightful interviews on his radio show and his level of professionalism is such that he rarely allows his personal circumstances impinge on the discussion (unless the likes of Jack oconnor choose to bring it up, jokingly or otherwise).

When one actually stops to consider this it is an all the more admirable quality when one takes into account the veritable nepotism and interconnectedness between all Ireland's movers and shakers as evident in his follow up interview with pol corr Fionnan Sheehan who just happens to be married to a FF senator.

The ole Irish sphere of influence is very small indeed. A direct hit on a randomly selected good Dublin dinner party or soiree would risk taking out a fair chunk of our banking, media, legal, business and political elite!
 

gatsbygirl20

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Was he referring to some actuarily calculated cost as opposed to the actual cost of funding from current revenue?
You've got me there, Sailor. (and I'd say you've got the Hobbit too, because he doesn't do detail, just soundbites about "cartels" "elite teachers" "elite nurses" etc)

So whether he meant actuarial cost or actual cost, I'm guessing it's whichever one makes teachers and nurses look like a bunch of rapacious greed-merchants who brought the country to its knees.

That'll be the one.
 

ManfredJudge

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I know. But it is not a route interviewers go down. It is seen as too personal. There is no way to justify the pension--or indeed the gouging and profiteering of many who preach austerity to the rest of us over the airways.

But they would all get into a mighty huff if you start getting personal (and it IS personal, in a contradictory sort of way, even when the taxpayer is funding the pension)

When Marian Finucane was interviewing Seanie and his cohorts during the boom, and they were telling her how workers need to be more "competitive" (ie. earn less) and how the minimum wage was an awful problem altogether, I wanted her to ask the obvious question, but knew it would not happen....

Even Vinnie backs off from it. Except with that little group of politician-masochists who love to be whipped by Vinnie because it gives them an illicit thrill...
If she were paid more perhaps she would have?
 

gatsbygirl20

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I think that's a bit unfair actually. Whatever personal criticisms and gripes people choose to level at Pat Kenny, he is a very intelligent man capable of very insightful interviews on his radio show and his level of professionalism is such that he rarely allows his personal circumstances impinge on the discussion (unless the likes of Jack oconnor choose to bring it up, jokingly or otherwise).

When one actually stops to consider this it is an all the more admirable quality when one takes into account the veritable nepotism and interconnectedness between all Ireland's movers and shakers as evident in his follow up interview with pol corr Fionnan Sheehan who just happens to be married to a FF senator.

The ole Irish sphere of influence is very small indeed. A direct hit on a randomly selected good Dublin dinner party or soiree would risk taking out a fair chunk of our banking, media, legal, business and political elite!
I agree. I think PK is excellent at his job, despite the fact that he lets his rich-man slip show sometimes. But I guess that is inevitable. And he can be a touch arrogant. And if an interviewee inadvertently hits a nerve, PK blanches and reddens and looks quite dangerous....but that is a small criticism.

He does his homework, which is something those macho fact-free ranters on other stations might emulate.

He has a great mastery of detail, and is especially good when dealing with a breaking story on his radio show. He is on top of it immediately.

His Frontline thing is not really working, but that is the format, not PK, I think.

Because he has his facts at his fingertips and understands the trajectory of an argument and an interview, he does not have to resort to sniping, personal attack, blustering, posturing or grandstanding
 

bactrian

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I am thoroughly and totally sick of hearing about Developers and bankers, and elites and golden circles etc. etc. etc. ad nauseam.

We should not ignore the history of their devastation of our economy, but can we please stop living in the past. They f@5ked up our economy. That has happened, we cannot change that mistake of history. It is in the past.

Please, please , please let's focus on NOW.

In the now we live in we have to rebuild our economy. Being bitter about the past is not going to help us.

Ask yourself the question
"Which would you prefer? You get those Bas@&£ds but the economy fails, or we fix the economy and they escape punishment?"

Personally I vote for getting out of the economic mess we are in and then looking to vengeance!
 

Mackers

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John Bruton is a failed politician still failing to recognise that for him to tell people to tighten belts while his girth expands care of pensions from the biggest gravy train known to man, might be funny if it wasn't so serious. He is a joke at the peoples expense.
 

still-life

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You've got me there, Sailor. (and I'd say you've got the Hobbit too, because he doesn't do detail, just soundbites about "cartels" "elite teachers" "elite nurses" etc)

So whether he meant actuarial cost or actual cost, I'm guessing it's whichever one makes teachers and nurses look like a bunch of rapacious greed-merchants who brought the country to its knees.

That'll be the one.
I think it's telling that you don't choose to dispute the veracity of his assertion, but instead insinuate that his motive is to mislead.

Since the general point of his argument is that PS pensions are expensive, why shouldn't he pick a fact (if true) to support the assertion?

Furthermore, as a teacher I'd have thought that you'd have appreciated the importance of a clear and easily memorable comparison as an aid to illustrating one's points.
 
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