Joining EFTA the best solution for Brexit, keeping the single market and allowing independent UK trade deals

Patslatt1

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2009
Messages
4,190
Joining EFTA the best solution for Brexit, keeping the single market and allowing independent UK trade deals

Brexiteers in the Tory Party insist on the UK's right to negotiate its own trade deals independently of the EU which would require leaving the EU customs union and likely abandoning the recently UK proposed customs partnership. They should consider joining the existing EFTA agreement for Norway and Switzerland which already is compatible with this Brexiteers' demand (see http://www.efta.int/eea/policy-areas/goods/customs-trade-facilitation/customs-matters ) except primarily for the difficult issue of collecting tariffs on UK imports destined for the EU.

Negotiating its own trade deals may prove hypothetical for the UK since the EU together with the UK have the combined economic might to secure far better trade deals than the UK alone. For proof, look at the superficial trade deals negotiated by the EFTA with many countries that account for only a small proportion of EFTA trade.

In the proposed customs partnership, technical checks were supposed to identify UK imports and import content in UK value added products destined for the EU. The UK would initially have collected external tariffs on behalf of the EU on all imports and later refunded businesses on imports not destined for the EU.

The latter proposal may have led Brexiteers in the UK government cabinet to reject customs partnership in the highly optimistic hope that a high tech solution can be found that would be less fiddly.

To facilitate imports trade, maybe the solution is for the UK government to pay the EU external tariff on behalf of imported goods that should be exempt and set up a system for getting a quick refund from the EU. Software systems such as the open platform of the global shipping company Maersk and IBM could quickly identify exempt imports. In a matter of days the rebates might be refunded from the EU to the UK, with the amount of capital tied up kept to a reasonable amount relative to the value of the UK's huge imports.

Northern Ireland could benefit from a trade deal along these lines since the single market with the EU would be kept.
 
Last edited:


Patslatt1

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2009
Messages
4,190
Brexiteers in the Tory Party insist on the UK's right to negotiate its own trade deals independently of the EU which would require leaving the EU customs union and likely abandoning the recently UK proposed customs partnership. They should consider joining the existing EFTA agreement for Norway and Switzerland which already is compatible with this Brexiteers' demand except primarily for the difficult issue of collecting tariffs on UK imports destined for the EU.

Negotiating its own trade deals may prove hypothetical for the UK since the EU together with the UK have the combined economic might to secure far better trade deals than the UK alone. For proof, look at the superficial trade deals negotiated by the EFTA with many countries that account for only a small proportion of EFTA trade.

In the proposed customs partnership, technical checks were supposed to identify UK imports and import content in UK value added products destined for the EU. The UK would initially have collected external tariffs on behalf of the EU on all imports and later refunded businesses on imports not destined for the EU.

The latter proposal may have led Brexiteers in the UK government cabinet to reject customs partnership in the highly optimistic hope that a high tech solution can be found that would be less fiddly.

To facilitate imports trade, maybe the solution is for the UK government to pay the EU external tariff on behalf of imported goods that should be exempt and set up a system for getting a quick refund from the EU. Software systems such as the open platform of the global shipping company Maersk and IBM could quickly identify exempt imports. In a matter of days the rebates might be refunded from the EU to the UK, with the amount of capital tied up kept to a reasonable amount relative to the value of the UK's huge imports.

Northern Ireland could benefit from a trade deal along these lines since the single market with the EU would be kept.
The EFTA may be the most likely solution for resolving the Brexit Irish border issue.
 

Trainwreck

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 6, 2012
Messages
26,416
Brexiteers in the Tory Party insist on the UK's right to negotiate its own trade deals independently of the EU which would require leaving the EU customs union and likely abandoning the recently UK proposed customs partnership. They should consider joining the existing EFTA agreement for Norway and Switzerland which already is compatible with this Brexiteers' demand except primarily for the difficult issue of collecting tariffs on UK imports destined for the EU.

Negotiating its own trade deals may prove hypothetical for the UK since the EU together with the UK have the combined economic might to secure far better trade deals than the UK alone. For proof, look at the superficial trade deals negotiated by the EFTA with many countries that account for only a small proportion of EFTA trade.

In the proposed customs partnership, technical checks were supposed to identify UK imports and import content in UK value added products destined for the EU. The UK would initially have collected external tariffs on behalf of the EU on all imports and later refunded businesses on imports not destined for the EU.

The latter proposal may have led Brexiteers in the UK government cabinet to reject customs partnership in the highly optimistic hope that a high tech solution can be found that would be less fiddly.

To facilitate imports trade, maybe the solution is for the UK government to pay the EU external tariff on behalf of imported goods that should be exempt and set up a system for getting a quick refund from the EU. Software systems such as the open platform of the global shipping company Maersk and IBM could quickly identify exempt imports. In a matter of days the rebates might be refunded from the EU to the UK, with the amount of capital tied up kept to a reasonable amount relative to the value of the UK's huge imports.

Northern Ireland could benefit from a trade deal along these lines since the single market with the EU would be kept.


The entire economic case for Brexit rests on leaving the customs union.

That is red line item.

That is why May faced revolt this week when it was rumoured this was potentially being compromised.
 

Analyzer

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2011
Messages
45,623
The one thing the political monopoly in Brussels does not like is.......

COMPETITION !!!!
 

cozzy121

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2009
Messages
5,155
Sigh...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Free_Trade_Association

European Free Trade Association
Relationship with the European Union[edit]
Except for Switzerland, the EFTA members are also members of the European Economic Area (EEA). The EEA comprises three member states of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and 28 member states of the European Union (EU), including Croatia which is provisionally applying the agreement pending its ratification by all EEA countries.[31][32] It was established on 1 January 1994 following an agreement with the European Community (which had become the EU two months earlier).[33] It allows the EFTA-EEA states to participate in the EU's Internal Market without being members of the EU. They adopt almost all EU legislation related to the single market, except laws on agriculture and fisheries. However, they also contribute to and influence the formation of new EEA relevant policies and legislation at an early stage as part of a formal decision-shaping process. One EFTA member, Switzerland, has not joined the EEA but has a series of bilateral agreements, including a free trade agreement, with the EU....
 

ruserious

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 3, 2011
Messages
29,090
The EU needs to maintain the mantra that there is no better deal than membership. Therefore the UK will not be offered better terms than members.
 

Hogsback

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2011
Messages
1,564
Brexiteers in the Tory Party insist on the UK's right to negotiate its own trade deals independently of the EU which would require leaving the EU customs union and likely abandoning the recently UK proposed customs partnership. They should consider joining the existing EFTA agreement for Norway and Switzerland which already is compatible with this Brexiteers' demand except primarily for the difficult issue of collecting tariffs on UK imports destined for the EU.

Negotiating its own trade deals may prove hypothetical for the UK since the EU together with the UK have the combined economic might to secure far better trade deals than the UK alone. For proof, look at the superficial trade deals negotiated by the EFTA with many countries that account for only a small proportion of EFTA trade.

In the proposed customs partnership, technical checks were supposed to identify UK imports and import content in UK value added products destined for the EU. The UK would initially have collected external tariffs on behalf of the EU on all imports and later refunded businesses on imports not destined for the EU.

The latter proposal may have led Brexiteers in the UK government cabinet to reject customs partnership in the highly optimistic hope that a high tech solution can be found that would be less fiddly.

To facilitate imports trade, maybe the solution is for the UK government to pay the EU external tariff on behalf of imported goods that should be exempt and set up a system for getting a quick refund from the EU. Software systems such as the open platform of the global shipping company Maersk and IBM could quickly identify exempt imports. In a matter of days the rebates might be refunded from the EU to the UK, with the amount of capital tied up kept to a reasonable amount relative to the value of the UK's huge imports.

Northern Ireland could benefit from a trade deal along these lines since the single market with the EU would be kept.
This has been the only realistic option from the get go.
If they don't latch on to this soon they will either crash out disastrously, or end up as the members they were before, minus any say in things (Brexit in name only).

From a UK perspective EFTA/EEA membership should take the form of the much vaunted 'transition period' - not an endpoint.
It is a safe place from which to unwind 40 years worth of trade legislation over a comfortable period of time - rather than the 2 year article 50 notification period, which is now obviously much less.

I'm at a loss to understand why they didn't go this way.
 

Hogsback

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2011
Messages
1,564
Relationship with the European Union[edit]
Except for Switzerland, the EFTA members are also members of the European Economic Area (EEA). The EEA comprises three member states of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and 28 member states of the European Union (EU), including Croatia which is provisionally applying the agreement pending its ratification by all EEA countries.[31][32] It was established on 1 January 1994 following an agreement with the European Community (which had become the EU two months earlier).[33] It allows the EFTA-EEA states to participate in the EU's Internal Market without being members of the EU. They adopt almost all EU legislation related to the single market, except laws on agriculture and fisheries. However, they also contribute to and influence the formation of new EEA relevant policies and legislation at an early stage as part of a formal decision-shaping process. One EFTA member, Switzerland, has not joined the EEA but has a series of bilateral agreements, including a free trade agreement, with the EU....
And most reasonable people would accept an extension in trade laws as part of a transition period, rather than attempting the impossible task of re-writing all of them - and negotiating and agreeing them - with the EU in an impossibly short period of time.
 

fifilawe

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 25, 2017
Messages
1,492
The EFTA may be the most likely solution for resolving the Brexit Irish border issue.
So Patslatt1 gets up early and starts an OP(Or did he just do a copy and paste job which seems to be prevalent on p.ie) , and suddenly he puts on his Travis Bickle Act "Are U Talking to me" by answering his own comment. What will he think of next ? ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ
 

Patslatt1

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2009
Messages
4,190
This has been the only realistic option from the get go.
If they don't latch on to this soon they will either crash out disastrously, or end up as the members they were before, minus any say in things (Brexit in name only).

From a UK perspective EFTA/EEA membership should take the form of the much vaunted 'transition period' - not an endpoint.
It is a safe place from which to unwind 40 years worth of trade legislation over a comfortable period of time - rather than the 2 year article 50 notification period, which is now obviously much less.

I'm at a loss to understand why they didn't go this way.
The Rule Brittania Tory Brexit faction is delusional but had to be humored by getting enough rope to hang itself as Brexit negotiators to avoid a split in the Tory Party. The Tory Remainers would vote with Labour to avoid hard Brexit.
 
Last edited:

Patslatt1

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2009
Messages
4,190
So Patslatt1 gets up early and starts an OP(Or did he just do a copy and paste job which seems to be prevalent on p.ie) , and suddenly he puts on his Travis Bickle Act "Are U Talking to me" by answering his own comment. What will he think of next ? ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ
In a previous OP which remained without commentary for days, answering my own OP triggered responses for some reason.
 

Patslatt1

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2009
Messages
4,190
The EU needs to maintain the mantra that there is no better deal than membership. Therefore the UK will not be offered better terms than members.
The EFTA is different to EU membership in that the UK would have no vote on EU laws and trade nor participation in the EU but Brexiteers would welcome that.
 
Last edited:

Patslatt1

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2009
Messages
4,190
The EFTA is different to EU membership in that the UK would have no vote on EU laws and trade nor participation in the EU but Brexiteers would welcome that.
Why isn't there more interest in EFTA as a solution to the hard border with Northern Ireland? Maybe the OP headline should be "EFTA to prevent paramilitary smuggling on a hard border"!
 

Trainwreck

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 6, 2012
Messages
26,416
Why isn't there more interest in EFTA as a solution to the hard border with Northern Ireland? Maybe the OP headline should be "EFTA to prevent paramilitary smuggling on a hard border"!
Because, most of the potential benefits to Britain of leaving the EU come directly as a result of leaving the customs union.


Say that over ten times, then think why Bexiteers are deeply opposed to EFTA or a "customs partnership". They know the need to leave the customs union.
 

Barroso

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 1, 2011
Messages
4,207
Brexiteers in the Tory Party insist on the UK's right to negotiate its own trade deals independently of the EU which would require leaving the EU customs union and likely abandoning the recently UK proposed customs partnership. They should consider joining the existing EFTA agreement for Norway and Switzerland which already is compatible with this Brexiteers' demand except primarily for the difficult issue of collecting tariffs on UK imports destined for the EU.

....
ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZzzzzz
.....

Northern Ireland could benefit from a trade deal along these lines since the single market with the EU would be kept.
And the EU benefits from this deal in what way?
 

boldfenianman

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 28, 2007
Messages
1,534
The one thing the political monopoly in Brussels does not like is.......

COMPETITION !!!!
How can Boris call Mrs Mays idea "crazy" and keep his job? This is a heck of a mess. If she keeps taking these insults it makes her look weaker and weaker. She cannot sack him but she has to. But she cannot. He would mount a challenge.........gosh.
 

Patslatt1

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2009
Messages
4,190
Because, most of the potential benefits to Britain of leaving the EU come directly as a result of leaving the customs union.


Say that over ten times, then think why Bexiteers are deeply opposed to EFTA or a "customs partnership". They know the need to leave the customs union.
For your benefit, these are the the opening lines of the OP:

"Brexiteers in the Tory Party insist on the UK's right to negotiate its own trade deals independently of the EU which would require leaving the EU customs union and likely abandoning the recently UK proposed customs partnership. They should consider joining the existing EFTA agreement for Norway and Switzerland which already is compatible with this Brexiteers' demand except primarily for the difficult issue of collecting tariffs on UK imports destined for the EU.

"Negotiating its own trade deals may prove hypothetical for the UK since the EU together with the UK have the combined economic might to secure far better trade deals than the UK alone. For proof, look at the superficial trade deals negotiated by the EFTA with many countries that account for only a small proportion of EFTA trade."
 

boldfenianman

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 28, 2007
Messages
1,534
For your benefit, these are the the opening lines of the OP:

"Brexiteers in the Tory Party insist on the UK's right to negotiate its own trade deals independently of the EU which would require leaving the EU customs union and likely abandoning the recently UK proposed customs partnership. They should consider joining the existing EFTA agreement for Norway and Switzerland which already is compatible with this Brexiteers' demand except primarily for the difficult issue of collecting tariffs on UK imports destined for the EU.

"Negotiating its own trade deals may prove hypothetical for the UK since the EU together with the UK have the combined economic might to secure far better trade deals than the UK alone. For proof, look at the superficial trade deals negotiated by the EFTA with many countries that account for only a small proportion of EFTA trade."
But Norway contributes to the EU budget but has no part in formulating rules all of which they must abide by. It makes no sense to me in a Brexit context. How is this taking back control?
 

Patslatt1

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2009
Messages
4,190
But Norway contributes to the EU budget but has no part in formulating rules all of which they must abide by. It makes no sense to me in a Brexit context. How is this taking back control?
Some sovereignty must be conceded in any trade agreement. Keeping the single market has huge advantages for the UK even if it has no say in the rule making as red tape barriers on trade could wreck UK trade with the EU, adding to costs the equivalent of about a fifth of transport and warehousing costs. As the small partner in the negotiations with the population of a 440 million EU minus the UK, the UK has to accept its weaker bargaining power.

UK contributions to the EU budget could be diluted over time. Such contributions were based on the concept that the vast capitalist free market created by the EU needs some socialist contributions to help the poorer countries to modernise.
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top