Kerry Journalist Ditches Her Accent to Avoid Being Thought of as Thick and Discrimination.

YesSireeeBob

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Article

[video=youtube;pit0OkNp7s8]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pit0OkNp7s8[/video]


This article was prompted by a RTE report from Kerry about stolen sheep and people (irish) on the internet were commenting that they couldn't make out a word he were saying.

A bit sad that Irish accents are now believed by Irish people to stand for being thick and backwardness.

Maybe speaking English sounds funny with an Irish accent as it will contain a lot of Irish language elements, as would a French / German person speaking English.

The more educated an Irish person, the less Irish sounding they will be, and so more people will try to sound educated.



“You don’t sound like you’re from Kerry” is something I’ve heard a lot in my adult life, always meant as a compliment.

I didn’t always sound like this. I sounded screechy Kerry until I realised what the rest of the country knew: sounding like you’re from Kerry means sounding thick. I tried to get rid of it.

In some ways it was fairly easy.

All you have to do to not sound like you’re from Kerry, that is stupid, is master this tiny trick where you actually enunciate words and stop saying “whisht”.

There are so many benefits.

You are instantly taken more seriously and no one knows where you’re from unless you tell them, provided you never ever drink and find new, more socially acceptable synonyms for “arrah” and “cratur”.


Interesting comment from the Indo

The number one Irish language virus is the fear of the “sh” sound.

Probably the most common among these is the word “appreciate”, correctly pronounced,”a-pree-she-ate”.

In order to avoid the Irish language pronunciation of “s” as “sh” as in for example “Síle”, and to sound a bit more posh, many Irish people, misled by RTE, pronounce the “c” as a soft “c” (or as an “s” and we get a-pree-see-ate).
It should be pronounced as an “sh” as the “c” in “special”.

The word “species” pronounced speesheez is usually pronounced spee-sees.

“Negotiate” (negoe-shee-ate) has become negoe-see-ate. “associate” (assoshshee-ate) has become assowsee-ate, “initiative” (in-ish-yaht-iv) has become in-iss-ee-at-iv and most annoying, some sports commentators telling us that “A.N Other is the referee who is “oaf-iss-ee-ae-ting” (officiating” pronounced“oaf-ish-ee-ae-ting”.

They are trying to avoid, “the besht in the wesht syndrome” and end up sounding daft.

So serious is this virus that many educated Irish people outside of RTE, including other sections of the media, who take their cue from RTE, and many secondary school teachers of English have become infected.

It may be caused by an association of the Irish language with backwardness.
 


HarshBuzz

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I blame the Healy-Reas for this state of affairs.
 

GDPR

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That Southerner was fine. Maybe not as authoritative as this accent.

[video=youtube;wuEJRSmRx0c]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuEJRSmRx0c[/video]
 

GDPR

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I'm vaguely reminded of a famous story about JM Synge giving direction to an actress in "The Playboy of the Western World" on how to sound authentic.

"Yes, Mr Synge, I do understand" she said hopelessly "But do you really want me to say, Ah now sh*t on the chair?"
 

GDPR

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Why does the Dublin meeja talk that awful way?

Why cant they sound normal, like Strabane Man and Kerry Man?
 

Bea C

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Well I have a very distinctive Kerry accent, 'in spite' of spending eight years at university, having one professional qualification and nearly the full accountancy grade.
I'd be devastated were I to ever lose it.
When I was teaching below in Midleton, I'd frequently get people observing how I'd a Kerry accent: my flat riposte was a simple 'what kind of an accent am I supposed to have?'.
The only response I ever got to that was a stupefied silence.
 

RodShaft

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Zapped(CAPITALISMROTS)

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Surra we arra all God's cretars anda as long as that Trump fella and that little chap from Korea don't stir up too much fuss and bother over the ho;y weekend surra we will all be still singing " cum be yeah " come Tuesday morn....................:rolleyes:
 

GDPR

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Well I have a very distinctive Kerry accent, 'in spite' of spending eight years at university, having one professional qualification and nearly the full accountancy grade.
I'd be devastated were I to ever lose it.
When I was teaching below in Midleton, I'd frequently get people observing how I'd a Kerry accent: my flat riposte was a simple 'what kind of an accent am I supposed to have?'.
The only response I ever got to that was a stupefied silence.
Good for you. Everyone has an accent.

The British are hilarious on this - "I don't have an accent". Yes, you do - you have the non-regional middleclass accent promulgated by the BBC. That's an accent. It was one which was actually created to make it difficult to discern where the speaker actually came from. That's terribly sad.

I find some Southern accents hard to "tune into" but only for five minutes. I'm such a sponge, I end up unconsciously imitating them after ten minutes.

Anyway, I don't get the Kerry hate. As a person from sheep-farming country, I was very interested in the story. Of course he was concerned about his sheep. FFS.
 

Bea C

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Whilst I deal with both west (sheep) and north Kerry (dairy) farmers every day, I don't know that particular man, but one of the lads I work with keeps a few sheep and he's done business with him. He says he's a very nice fella.
I think Kerry people as a whole don't give a toss, though I do at Christmas come upon people home who have the accent altered. I don't mean people who moved to New Zealand twenty years ago and haven't been home since, obviously after time things fade, but I mean young wans who've moved up the road to Dublin in the past decade.
It's sad.
It's actually quite pathetic, be your accent a 'bogger' one or from the wrong side of the tracks in the city: it's a sign of true insecurity.
 

GDPR

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I looked back on that interesting clip about the Kerry farmer - and I still don't get it.

What was meant to be wrong with either the way he spoke, or the reporters accent?

Now a full on Northern accent is basically only intelligible to family and friends, mercifully because if a stranger understood what we were saying, then it might result in nuclear war or something.

So UTV and BBC NI just tell their reporters to slow down and dont say "See here, boy" when addressing a minister, etc, or refer to politicians etc as "Yer man, from the DUP" or "Yon wee woman, the Sinn Feiner."

Is it that hard? Or is this another Southern mystery?
 

Lara2

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That Southerner was fine. Maybe not as authoritative as this accent.

[video=youtube;wuEJRSmRx0c]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuEJRSmRx0c[/video]
I love how diverse the Irish accent is from North to South of the island. Hate that homogenous D4 accent everyone in the media talks with (including people from outside Dublin). Thank god we don't all talk with that Americanised transatlantic drawl. Many people on p.ie slag the Kerry accent or a thick Dublin accent but I'd rather talk like that than have the D4 drawl. Accents are important, they are unique to us as individuals and I can understand what most people are saying, from Belfast to Kerry. I can understand the Scottish and Welsh accents too though I have trouble understanding Londoners, however Londoners have difficulty understanding any accent outside of London.

When I saw the clip of the Kerry farmer on the news, at first I wasn't sure what he was saying but when I listened more carefully I could understand him. He was explaining that his sheep were robbed under the light of the full moon. Don't know why people are poking fun at him, his sheep were rustled.
 

Bea C

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I love how diverse the Irish accent is from North to South of the island. Hate that homogenous D4 accent everyone in the media talks with (including people from outside Dublin). Thank god we don't all talk with that Americanised transatlantic drawl. Many people on p.ie slag the Kerry accent or a thick Dublin accent but I'd rather talk like that than have the D4 drawl. Accents are important, they are unique to us as individuals and I can understand what most people are saying, from Belfast to Kerry. I can understand the Scottish and Welsh accents too though I have trouble understanding Londoners, however Londoners have difficulty understanding any accent outside of London.

When I saw the clip of the Kerry farmer on the news, at first I wasn't sure what he was saying but when I listened more carefully I could understand him. He was explaining that his sheep were robbed under the light of the full moon. Don't know why people are poking fun at him, his sheep were rustled.
Aren't we regarded as remarkable for our diversity of accents on such a small island (once upon a time, anyway).
 

gleeful

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Unless people can understand you there is little point in speaking. Local accents so thick they cant be understood should all be abandoned.
 


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