• Due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software, some users were "banned" when they tried to change their passwords at the end of February. This does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you were affected by this, please us viua the Contact us link in the footer.

Kids eating washing powder – parents blaming the manufacturers/supermarkets!


Tea Party Patriot

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
11,557
Really you couldn’t make something like this up. I was listening to the radio this morning, not sure which station but I think it was RTE Radio 1.

Anyway the gist of the discussion underway was that kids have a tendency to pick up the little packets of washing detergent and put them in their mouths. Now apparently if they break them and this gets in the eyes its causes soreness for a number of weeks. And if they eat it a trip to the hospital for monitoring and presumably stomach pumping is required.

The discussion went on wondering why companies were not forced to do something about this, and how because it was only an irritant they weren't obliged to by law.

Now to me the simple solution would be if irresponsible and stupid parents locked the detergent away so the kids couldn't eat it or put it in their eyes in the first instance. Let’s face it there are always going to be lots of things around a house that are dangerous for kids to get near, why on earth should the strength of washing detergent be reduced because of irresponsible parents?

Note to Mods I have placed this in culture and community because I feel that the discussion here is one on people shifting blame for everything onto someone else as opposed to accepting responsibility and planning normal risk avoidance themselves. This is becoming more and more culturally prevalent.
 


drummed

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 22, 2010
Messages
37,436
Do as the Americans would and put a label saying "This is not a foodstuff for human consumption" on it. Its on everything from soap to cars over there. if we were a smarter society we'd have done it ages ago but instead we get a whitewash of the issue.
 

Fall Girl

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2012
Messages
941
I'd have to agree. The whole Health and Safety thing has gone haywire.
There's quite a large gap between two of my children and the H&S advice for the younger of them was way OTT.
We are responsible for our children.
 

Malbekh

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 30, 2009
Messages
3,032
Really you couldn’t make something like this up. I was listening to the radio this morning, not sure which station but I think it was RTE Radio 1.

Anyway the gist of the discussion underway was that kids have a tendency to pick up the little packets of washing detergent and put them in their mouths. Now apparently if they break them and this gets in the eyes its causes soreness for a number of weeks. And if they eat it a trip to the hospital for monitoring and presumably stomach pumping is required.

The discussion went on wondering why companies were not forced to do something about this, and how because it was only an irritant they weren't obliged to by law.

Now to me the simple solution would be if irresponsible and stupid parents locked the detergent away so the kids couldn't eat it or put it in their eyes in the first instance. Let’s face it there are always going to be lots of things around a house that are dangerous for kids to get near, why on earth should the strength of washing detergent be reduced because of irresponsible parents?

Note to Mods I have placed this in culture and community because I feel that the discussion here is one on people shifting blame for everything onto someone else as opposed to accepting responsibility and planning normal risk avoidance themselves. This is becoming more and more culturally prevalent.
I missed most of this but I thought the problem was the soluble balls (oo-er) of liquid detergent. The onus on the manufacturer is to supply packaging that suits the product. If the product represents a danger to children - particularly if small children could mistake it for a drink or similar - then the packaging must be child resistant.

I agree that parents should be responsible for trying to ensure that all hazardous products are kept out of reach, but this does not absolve the manufacturer to provide acceptable packaging. The plastic boxes they come in should therefore be provided with some Child Resistant feature.
 
D

Dylan2010

There was a thread on boards yesterday where the numpty was asking could he use the dishwasher salt instead of table salt. The Darwin award is still up for grabs apparently.

to your point there are any number of fluids that would kill a kid in a house, anyone that would blame a manufacture have probably being drinking the Lemon flavored Flash because it smells nice.
 

Tea Party Patriot

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
11,557
Do as the Americans would and put a label saying "This is not a foodstuff for human consumption" on it. Its on everything from soap to cars over there. if we were a smarter society we'd have done it ages ago but instead we get a whitewash of the issue.
Its already labelled, what the people on the radio show were looking for was a change in the ingredients.
 

drummed

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 22, 2010
Messages
37,436
Its already labelled, what the people on the radio show were looking for was a change in the ingredients.
Ahh, ok. Well that won't work unless someone invents edible washing powder.
 

Septic Frank

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 13, 2012
Messages
428
I thought everything in America was edible?

Anyhow, this serious issue will have to be flushed out. No whitewash, but if course we mustn't throw the baby out with the bath water.
 

tigerben

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 21, 2010
Messages
4,614
This what you get with a nanny state , some one else must always be blamed. Stupid labelling now on take out coffee and tea warning product is hot, egg Cartons with a warning that it contains egg and so on.
 

Tea Party Patriot

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
11,557
I missed most of this but I thought the problem was the soluble balls (oo-er) of liquid detergent. The onus on the manufacturer is to supply packaging that suits the product. If the product represents a danger to children - particularly if small children could mistake it for a drink or similar - then the packaging must be child resistant.

I agree that parents should be responsible for trying to ensure that all hazardous products are kept out of reach, but this does not absolve the manufacturer to provide acceptable packaging. The plastic boxes they come in should therefore be provided with some Child Resistant feature.
That kind of packaging for a box of detergent would be too costly and would make it unviable as a product. Increasing the strength of the plastic on the capsules would mean they would take longer to dissolve and no be in sync with the washing cycle of most machines.

I really think the responsibility for this should lie firmly with the parents to lock this kind of stuff away when not in use.
 
Last edited:

cabledude

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 23, 2011
Messages
6,362
Brings my mind back to 6 years ago when my chap was a toddler. Went very quiet one afternoon when we were cleaning up. We found him in the utility room sitting down biting into a washing powder tablet. He had managed to get just get through the plastic wrapper and there was a little powder on his lips. Mammy went nuts. I thought it was funny, in a cute kind of way, but then the panic set in. He didn't ingest any of the stuff and we washed his mouth out fairly well.

Was this the fault of the manufacturer?

Like hell. It was our fault. People are very quick to blame others.
 

Malbekh

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 30, 2009
Messages
3,032
That kind of packaging for a box of detergent would be too costly and would make it unviable as a product. Increasing the strength of the plastic on the capsules would mean they would take longer to dissolve and no be in sync with the washing cycle of most machines.

I really think the responsibility for this should lye firmly with the parents to lock this kind of stuff away when not in use.
Ah, no it wouldn't. You'd modify the tool for the box and lid and incorporate a CR feature. I agree about the parents, but if granny is minding the kids and decides to help the family by putting on a wash, accidents happen. It looks like the product is considered an irritant and not a hazard, and therefore gets away without complying to various BS EN ISO and CFR21 standards.
 

The Owl

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 11, 2011
Messages
2,967
That kind of packaging for a box of detergent would be too costly and would make it unviable as a product. Increasing the strength of the plastic on the capsules would mean they would take longer to dissolve and no be in sync with the washing cycle of most machines.

I really think the responsibility for this should lye firmly with the parents to lock this kind of stuff away when not in use.
Lye would certainly poison anyone. Big or small.
 

Tea Party Patriot

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
11,557

New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top