Kuwait follows Trump with Visa bans for 5 Muslim Majority countries.



ne0ica

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Fair play to Kuwait for including the US so called 'ally' Pakistan.
 
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Does Kuwait have the second amendment in place?

There are those of us who are trying to assess the US in terms of its own constitution.
 

Mick Mac

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Kuwait has suspended the issuance of visas for nationals of five Muslim Majority countries Syria, Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iran. Four of these countries are on Trumps temporary visa delay.
Should we now boycott Kuwait too?


After Trump, Now Kuwait Bans 5 Muslim-Majority Countries, Including Pakistan
No bans, no hate,
Up yours, Kuwait

Repeat x 10,000 times.

Kuwait of course never did anything that would trigger the Snowflakes.

Women’s Rights, Sexual Orientation, and Gender Identity

Women continue to face discrimination in many aspects of their lives, and large legal gaps remain in protections for them. Kuwait has no laws prohibiting domestic violence, sexual harassment, or marital rape. Legislation proposed in April 2014 to penalize sexual harassment was not passed in 2015. Kuwaiti women married to non-Kuwaitis, unlike Kuwaiti men, cannot pass on their citizenship to their children or spouses. Kuwaiti law also prevents a woman from marrying a partner of her choice without her father’s permission.

Same-sex relations between men are punishable by up to seven years in prison. Transgender people can be arrested under a penal code provision that prohibits “imitating the opposite sex in any way.”

Migrant Workers

About 2 million of Kuwait’s 2.9 million population are migrant workers. Abuse and exploitation of migrant domestic workers—who comprise a large proportion of the migrant worker population—continued to be reported, including withholding of salaries, and physical and sexual abuse.

In June 2015, Kuwait passed a new law giving domestic workers enforceable labor rights for the first time. The law grants domestic workers the right to a weekly day off, 30 days of annual paid leave, a 12-hour working day with rest, and an end-of-service benefit of one month a year at the end of the contract, among other rights.

However, it has only unspecified “hours of rest” and lacks other key protections found in the general labor law, such as an 8-hour day; one hour of rest after every 5 hours of work; and detailed provisions for sick leave, including 15 days at full pay.

The domestic worker law also falls short by failing to set out enforcement mechanisms, such as labor inspections. It prohibits employers from confiscating workers’ passports, a common abuse, but fails to specify penalties. The new law does not guarantee the right to form a union. It came into force on July 26, 2015, when it was published in the Official Gazette. The Interior Ministry is required to issue regulations to implement the law by January 2016.


Treatment of Minorities

At least 105,702 Bidun residents of Kuwait remain stateless.

After an initial registration period for citizenship ended in 1960, authorities shifted Bidun citizenship claims to administrative committees that for decades have avoided resolving the claims. Authorities claim that many Bidun are “illegal residents” who deliberately destroyed evidence of another nationality in order to receive benefits that Kuwait gives its citizens.

Members of the Bidun community frequently take to the streets to protest the government’s failure to address their citizenship claims, despite government warnings that Bidun should not gather in public. Article 12 of the 1979 Public Gatherings Law bars non-Kuwaitis from participating in public gatherings.

In media interviews during the year, government officials suggested that Kuwait may “solve” the Bidun community’s nationality claims by paying the Comoros Islands to grant the Bidun a form of economic citizenship, thus regularizing them as foreign nationals in Kuwait and rendering them liable to legal deportation from Kuwait—possibly violating their right to family life.
 
D

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Does Kuwait have the second amendment in place?

There are those of us who are trying to assess the US in terms of its own constitution.
I thought our concerns were with humanitarian issue - hardly our business whether or not the US action is constitutional.
 

Mick Mac

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Does Kuwait have the second amendment in place?

There are those of us who are trying to assess the US in terms of its own constitution.
They are quite muscular in opposing freedom of expression.

Is that okay because they didnt earlier feel it was important to have freedom of expression?

Mick
Freedom of Expression

Kuwaiti authorities have invoked several provisions in the constitution, penal code, Printing and Publication Law, Misuse of Telephone Communications and Bugging Devices Law, Public Gatherings Law, and National Unity Law to prosecute over a dozen people over the last few years for criticizing in blogs or on Twitter, Facebook, or other social media the emir, the government, religion, and the rulers of neighboring countries.

Those prosecuted have faced charges such as harming the honor of another person; insulting the emir or other public figures or the judiciary; insulting religion; planning or participating in illegal gatherings; and misusing telephone communications. Other charges include harming state security, inciting the government’s overthrow, and harming Kuwait’s relations with other states. From January to October, courts convicted at least five of those charged, imposing prison sentences of up to six years and fines.

In June 2015, Kuwait passed a new cybercrime law that includes far-reaching restrictions on Internet-based speech. Article 6 of the law imposes prison sentences and fines for insulting religion and religious figures, and for criticizing the emir on the Internet. Article 6 also prohibits Internet-based statements deemed to criticize the judicial system or harm Kuwait’s relations with other states, or that publicize classified information, without exceptions for disclosures in the public interest.

Article 7 imposes a punishment of up to 10 years in prison for using the Internet to “overthrow the ruling regime in the country when this instigation included an enticement to change the system by force or through illegal means, or by urging to use force to change the social and economic system that exists in the country, or to adopt creeds that aim at destroying the basic statutes of Kuwait through illegal means.” The law empowers authorities to close for one year all outlets or locations in which these crimes are committed and confiscate devices used in committing them.
 

ne0ica

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Clanrickard

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Dimples 77

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I thought our concerns were with humanitarian issue - hardly our business whether or not the US action is constitutional.
A very good point.

Some people are very legalistic about these things though.
 

im axeled

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No bans, no hate,
Up yours, Kuwait

Repeat x 10,000 times.

Kuwait of course never did anything that would trigger the Snowflakes.
we await the marches, marches which will never happen as its not enough publicity going with it
 

ne0ica

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Is Kuwait being Islamophobic?
They live in the neighborhood and have just put a travel ban on four of Trumps bans and included Pakistan for good measure.

Sound like sensible folk to me looking out for their citizens safety unlike the white sjw's of the West.
 

Dimples 77

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They live in the neighborhood and have just put a travel ban on four of Trumps bans and included Pakistan for good measure.

Sound like sensible folk to me looking out for their citizens safety unlike the white sjw's of the West.

You're still wrong about that.

Can't you count?
 

Lempo

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Does Kuwait have the second amendment in place?

There are those of us who are trying to assess the US in terms of its own constitution.
2nd amendment is the one about militias and boomsticks, right?

Anyway I believe the question if the foreign nationals in different countries are in any way protected by the US constitution still remains unanswered.
 

Dimples 77

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They live in the neighborhood and have just put a travel ban on four of Trumps bans and included Pakistan for good measure.

Sound like sensible folk to me looking out for their citizens safety unlike the white sjw's of the West.

If Trump was so concerned about safety, why didn't he include Pakistan, Afghanistan and Saudi Arabia on his list?

The US invaded Iraq to supposedly save it, and now he bans everyone from that country - even those who have fought alongside US forces. How does that make any sense since Afghanistan isn't on his list?
 

ne0ica

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If Trump was so concerned about safety, why didn't he include Pakistan, Afghanistan and Saudi Arabia on his list?

The US invaded Iraq to supposedly save it, and now he bans everyone from that country - even those who have fought alongside US forces. How does that make any sense since Afghanistan isn't on his list?
Because its not a Muslim ban.

He needs Pakistan as a route to supply US forces in Afghanistan. Saudi is a long standing US ally and is currently engaged in a Cold War in the region with a US adversary Iran.
 

Lempo

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I thought our concerns were with humanitarian issue - hardly our business whether or not the US action is constitutional.
I understand when a person has been granted a refugee status he or she is already under the international protection. The resettlement to United States or any other third country after that is one possible durable solution, where the country in question has an enormous say. Bitching at United States, by far the biggest resettler of refugees in the world about them supposedly failing to do their part now is somewhat counter-intellectual.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_country_resettlement
 
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I thought our concerns were with humanitarian issue - hardly our business whether or not the US action is constitutional.
It is a concern in the US. How the fùck can you misunderstand that?
 

Dimples 77

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Because its not a Muslim ban.

He needs Pakistan as a route to supply US forces in Afghanistan. Saudi is a long standing US ally and is currently engaged in a Cold War in the region with a US adversary Iran.

I didn't say it was a Muslim ban.

Can't you address my question?

If he has banned travel from places that are messed up, why was Afghanistan not put on the list? You just confirmed that the US needs to supply US forces in Afghanistan - that's because there is still trouble there. So why does his outlook of "we don't know who these people are" not apply to Afghans too?

And as I said before, If Trump was so concerned about safety, why is he not stopping everyone from traveling from places that "bad dudes" have come from before - Pakistan and Saudi Arabia? Either he is dedicated to stopping bad dudes, or he isn't. It doesn't matter if he needs a country, or if a country is an ally - surely the safety of the US people should come first.

FFS, Iraq is supposed to be an ally, so why has he banned all the pro-US people who live there? He seems content to let any Saudi travel to the US, no matter what they think of the US (and we know that many of them hate the US), yet he has banned people who have literally fought for their country against the likes of Saddam and ISIS.

The whole thing makes no sense.
 


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