• It has come to our attention that some users may have been "banned" when they tried to change their passwords after the site was hacked due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software. This would have occurred around the end of February and does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you believe you were affected by this, please contact a staff member or use the Contact us link at the bottom of any forum page.

Labour policy re work permits for Asylum Seekers?


Kevin Parlon

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
10,682
Twitter
Deiscirt
Hello,

I noted this comment in the IT today . Rabbitte has said that Labour position was that "the correct thing to do was to enable quicker decisions to be taken on people’s asylum cases and change the situation with regard to the right to work for asylum seekers"

Is it Labour policy to change the law to grant the right to work to asylum seekers? I didn't realise this was the case and would appreciate input from any party apparatchiks here on the site.

I did a quick look on labour.ie but was turning up year 2000 policy docs etc.

Many thanks.
 

bormotello

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 8, 2008
Messages
12,171
Policy
The entitlement of asylum seekers to their human rights

Conference notes:
That applying for refugee status in Ireland is a lengthy process, which can fail to recognise the particular circumstances of the person seeking asylum and overall lacks transparency and fairness.

Conference further notes:
That asylum seekers are living in very poor conditions and that barriers exist in relation to asylum seekers participating in Irish society.

Conference therefore calls for:
1. (a) The Office of the Refugee Application Commissioner to be replaced by an independent human rights body to ensure that individuals are assessed on the grounds of international human rights laws which have been ratified by the Irish government.
(b) Extra resources to be put in place to ensure that cases are examined in a shorter time frame.
(c) Asylum seekers to be entitled to proficient translators during interviews.

2. (a) Asylum seekers to be given the opportunity to participate in paid employment.
(b) Payment of €19.10 a week to be increased to a more realistic sum to ensure a sufficient standard of living.
(c) The living conditions of asylum seekers, particularly in relation to overcrowding in accommodation and the poor quality of food, to be improved.
(d) Greater provision of activities for asylum seekers.
(e) Research to be carried out into child poverty among asylum seekers and for the State to ensure asylum seeking children have the same rights and entitlements as Irish children.
(f) The State to increase its funding to SPIRASI, a voluntary organisation that works with asylum seekers who have survived torture.
 

Kevin Parlon

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
10,682
Twitter
Deiscirt
That's pretty clear (if pretty shortsighted IMO) Thanks for responding.
 

Passer-by

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
1,436
I would presume (perhaps wrongly) that their intention would be to bring Ireland into line with the provisions of the EU directive laying down minimum standards for the reception of asylum seekers (2003/9/EC).

In it, the section on employment states:

Article 11

Employment

1. Member States shall determine a period of time, starting from the date on which an application for asylum was lodged, during which an applicant shall not have access to the labour market.

2. If a decision at first instance has not been taken within one year of the presentation of an application for asylum and this delay cannot be attributed to the applicant, Member States shall decide the conditions for granting access to the labour market for the applicant.

3. Access to the labour market shall not be withdrawn during appeals procedures, where an appeal against a negative decision in a regular procedure has suspensive effect, until such time as a negative decision on the appeal is notified.

4. For reasons of labour market policies, Member States may give priority to EU citizens and nationals of States parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area and also to legally resident third-country nationals.

(Bold and italics are my added emphasis)
In other words, the effect would be to force the member state to get its ass in gear and actually process the (initial) asylum applications.

Ireland is the only EU state to which this directive does not apply (The UK has opted-in to it). I, personally, suspect this has more to do with the Dept of Justice not wanting to have to work to deadlines rather than any principled objections to the contents of the directive on their part.
 

Conor

Moderator
Joined
Apr 7, 2004
Messages
5,206

Kevin Parlon

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
10,682
Twitter
Deiscirt
Could anyone point me to official labour party policy vis a vis Asylum Seekers? Thank you Conor for pointing that our as a Labour Youth doc. It seems they are in favour of a relaxation of laws surrouding the process and I am keen to understand just what it is they intend to do. Thank you.
 

FutureTaoiseach

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 20, 2005
Messages
7,992
Website
greatdearleader.blogspot.com
I would presume (perhaps wrongly) that their intention would be to bring Ireland into line with the provisions of the EU directive laying down minimum standards for the reception of asylum seekers (2003/9/EC).

In it, the section on employment states:



In other words, the effect would be to force the member state to get its ass in gear and actually process the (initial) asylum applications.

Ireland is the only EU state to which this directive does not apply (The UK has opted-in to it). I, personally, suspect this has more to do with the Dept of Justice not wanting to have to work to deadlines rather than any principled objections to the contents of the directive on their part.
It's easier for a country of tens of millions of taxpayers to afford large numbers of asylum seekers than one of just a few million. And experience of EU Enlargement has been that the cake actually gets smaller when you increase foreign-national access to the labour market (the CSO says the Irish economy has returned to its 2002 size).
 

ManUnited

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 16, 2009
Messages
5,221
It's easier for a country of tens of millions of taxpayers to afford large numbers of asylum seekers than one of just a few million. And experience of EU Enlargement has been that the cake actually gets smaller when you increase foreign-national access to the labour market (the CSO says the Irish economy has returned to its 2002 size).
As much as you try to deny it FT, you are an xenophobe.
 

FutureTaoiseach

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 20, 2005
Messages
7,992
Website
greatdearleader.blogspot.com
As much as you try to deny it FT, you are an xenophobe.
As much as you try to deny it ManUnited, you are PC-gone mad. :rolleyes: The CSO has stated that the size of the economy is at 2002 levels. Fact: EU Enlargement happened in 2004.
 

ManUnited

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 16, 2009
Messages
5,221
As much as you try to deny it ManUnited, you are PC-gone mad. :rolleyes: The CSO has stated that the size of the economy is at 2002 levels. Fact: EU Enlargement happened in 2004.
You can cry all you like Future Taoiseach but the 'bottom billion' are coming, and there is nothing you can do to stop them.It might be global warming or resource wars or whatever, mass migration is upon us and it's only going to increase.Ireland will not be immune.Time for some 21st century ideas for 21st century problems.
 

FutureTaoiseach

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 20, 2005
Messages
7,992
Website
greatdearleader.blogspot.com
You can cry all you like Future Taoiseach but the 'bottom billion' are coming, and there is nothing you can do to stop them.It might be global warming or resource wars or whatever, mass migration is upon us and it's only going to increase.Ireland will not be immune.Time for some 21st century ideas for 21st century problems.
The doctrine of "inevitability" is just a Socialist plot to impose their agenda on society untrammelled by democratic checks and balances. I don't care what someone's skin colour is, but I do believe that charity begins at home and that the needs of Irish society should come first in the minds of those that govern the country. Had it been so since 2004 we wouldn't be in this mess. At a time when tens of thousands of our own people are having to emigrate to find work, it would be reverse-racism to simply bring in cheap-labour to replace them. We were never a colonial-power and do not have special obligations to the Third World above and beyond the requirement to provide humanitarian aid within their own countries.
 

ManUnited

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 16, 2009
Messages
5,221
The doctrine of "inevitability" is just a Socialist plot to impose their agenda on society untrammelled by democratic checks and balances. I don't care what someone's skin colour is, but I do believe that charity begins at home and that the needs of Irish society should come first in the minds of those that govern the country. Had it been so since 2004 we wouldn't be in this mess. At a time when tens of thousands of our own people are having to emigrate to find work, it would be reverse-racism to simply bring in cheap-labour to replace them. We were never a colonial-power and do not have special obligations to the Third World above and beyond the requirement to provide humanitarian aid within their own countries.
I have read many of your posts Future Taioseach and I know you are not a racist and I know that you are not without compassion, but you are deluding yourself if you think we can keep the oncoming tide of immigrants from our shores.I'm not a socialist, a realist more like it.Nationhood and sovereignty are only new ideas and are fast becoming irrelevant.
 

Chi019

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
750
I have read many of your posts Future Taioseach and I know you are not a r*cist and I know that you are not without compassion, but you are deluding yourself if you think we can keep the oncoming tide of immigrants from our shores.I'm not a socialist, a realist more like it.Nationhood and sovereignty are only new ideas and are fast becoming irrelevant.
Actually, it's really really easy. Japan has done it for years.

Despite being the third largest donor in the world to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Japan admits only a tiny number of asylum seekers compared to other industrialized nations, and often appears reluctant to grant refugee status to those who do come. Damning statistics are bandied about, such as the fact that the country has accepted just 508 refugees from the 7,297 applications made since 1982.
Asylum seekers find little refuge in Japan Japan Today: Japan News and Discussion
 

Chi019

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
750
Sorry Chi but I don't get your point.Because Japan has its head in the sand we should too?
My point is that more European countries should lose their misguided guilt and follow the example of Japan, Korea, China, Tibet, Taiwan, Turkey, Libya etc. Those nations are not going to allow their countries to be transformed for the worse by mass low skill immigration (and fair enough). A government's primary duty is to protect their citizens and that extends to preventing statistically high welfare & crime populations from entering.

GENEVA - Libyan authorities have ordered the UN refugee agency to shut its office in Libya and leave the country, an agency spokeswoman said on Tuesday.

"We have received instructions by the Libyan government for UNHCR to cease its activities in Libya, basically we've been instructed to close our office there," said Melissa Fleming, a spokeswoman for the office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).

"We have not been given any reason by Libyan authorities for why we should leave the country," she told journalists. They gave
Middle East Online
 
Last edited:

Kevin Parlon

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
10,682
Twitter
Deiscirt
Any chance of someone au fait with Labour Policy in this area chiming in? :)
 

ManUnited

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 16, 2009
Messages
5,221
My point is that more European countries should lose their misguided guilt and follow the example of Japan, Korea, China, Tibet, Taiwan, Turkey, Libya etc. Those nations are not going to allow their countries to be transformed for the worse by mass low skill immigration (and fair enough). A government's primary duty is to protect their citizens and that extends to preventing statistically high welfare & crime populations from entering.

Middle East Online
Sounds nice Chi but not really facing the horrible reality.Europe (and Ireland) is in the firing line because, lets face it, you can see European shores from North Africa.You can see the sea side villas in Spain from the slums of Tangier.It's not about guilt, it's about the inevitable rush of the have nots towards the fat, lazy European heartland.It's only a matter of time and the Muslim demographic pressure, the flood of refugees and the unsustainable inequality will change our world forever.For the better I think.We will have to get used to sharing because we will have no other choice.
 

Riddickcule

Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2009
Messages
12
The world belongs to everyone. Sometimes it's just ignorant to be proud of your country.
 

Cato

Moderator
Joined
Aug 21, 2005
Messages
20,561
Top