Let's All Meet Up In Risk Matrix 2000

Sync

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https://www.rte.ie/news/courts/2018/0517/964188-courts-sex-attack/
A 34-year-old man has been sentenced to 18-and-a-half years in prison for the false imprisonment, sexual assault and assault of three women in separate attacks in Dublin.

The man had denied attacking the women on dates in 2011, 2015 and 2016 at locations in Clondalkin.

He used the same method, targeting women in the early hours of the morning, approaching from behind using stealth.
Bad person did bad things, got 18 years. Good.

What makes the story interesting though is Judge Pauline Codd's apparent anger at the parole boards assessment of the attacker being only "Medium" (2nd lowest on a 4 mark matrix), resulting in her overruling their recommendation on sentencing and handling.

This is because they assessed this as a single incident as opposed to 3. So he's a single time offender, which they then enter into their algorithm and it comes out medium. Not 3 incidents which would presumably have a higher rating. So the lesson is that if you're a really EFFECTIVE criminal and avoid justice for years while continuing to offend, you get credit for that.

RTE 1 News at 1 on Sunday 20th May go into this in lots of detail, but the Parole folks are clear that they'll continue to use the matrix and nothing to see here.

Bizarre. It's literally rewarding the criminal for not getting caught after the first incident and continuing to offend in the meantime.
 


paulp

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https://www.rte.ie/news/courts/2018/0517/964188-courts-sex-attack/

Bad person did bad things, got 18 years. Good.

What makes the story interesting though is Judge Pauline Codd's apparent anger at the parole boards assessment of the attacker being only "Medium" (2nd lowest on a 4 mark matrix), resulting in her overruling their recommendation on sentencing and handling.

This is because they assessed this as a single incident as opposed to 3. So he's a single time offender, which they then enter into their algorithm and it comes out medium. Not 3 incidents which would presumably have a higher rating. So the lesson is that if you're a really EFFECTIVE criminal and avoid justice for years while continuing to offend, you get credit for that.

RTE 1 News at 1 on Sunday 20th May go into this in lots of detail, but the Parole folks are clear that they'll continue to use the matrix and nothing to see here.

Bizarre. It's literally rewarding the criminal for not getting caught after the first incident and continuing to offend in the meantime.
I assume the parole people assume that until the criminal has had the benefits of the rehabilitative effects of an Irish prison, they should be given the benefit of the doubt?
Good God!
 

redhead

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Oh look "lock the scumbag up" click bait. How original and nuanced a discussion.
 

Ireniall

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I assume the parole people assume that until the criminal has had the benefits of the rehabilitative effects of an Irish prison, they should be given the benefit of the doubt?
Good God!
This c*nt refused to engage with the so-called rehabilitative services in prison.
 

Sync

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Oh look "lock the scumbag up" click bait. How original and nuanced a discussion.
It's not really, he's been locked up, that's good. The nuance is in the matrix being used.

Presumably the logic is that because he hasn't been subject to rehabilitative efforts in the past, it's not reasonable to count up all the crimes he committed against him. So for instance if you catch him after the first one, he could be rehabilitated, so no new ones.

That still seems to get the balance between protection and rehabilitation wrong to me though.
 

Dame_Enda

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There is no consistency in sentencing in sexual assault cases in this country. Some rapists get life, others get 7 years (sometimes with part suspended). Adds to case for a Sentencing Council.

At the same time I do believe there are different degrees of severity in crimes including sexual crimes, and that we should adopt the American concept of First/Second/Third Degree in sentencing. We would get more consistency that way.
 
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Herr Rommel

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I assume the parole people assume that until the criminal has had the benefits of the rehabilitative effects of an Irish prison, they should be given the benefit of the doubt?
Good God!
There is always one....
 

Mick Mac

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Explains the 80 conviction stories weogt here about.

At least perspective.


Great thread.
 

Hewson

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https://www.rte.ie/news/courts/2018/0517/964188-courts-sex-attack/

Bad person did bad things, got 18 years. Good.

What makes the story interesting though is Judge Pauline Codd's apparent anger at the parole boards assessment of the attacker being only "Medium" (2nd lowest on a 4 mark matrix), resulting in her overruling their recommendation on sentencing and handling.

This is because they assessed this as a single incident as opposed to 3. So he's a single time offender, which they then enter into their algorithm and it comes out medium. Not 3 incidents which would presumably have a higher rating. So the lesson is that if you're a really EFFECTIVE criminal and avoid justice for years while continuing to offend, you get credit for that.

RTE 1 News at 1 on Sunday 20th May go into this in lots of detail, but the Parole folks are clear that they'll continue to use the matrix and nothing to see here.

Bizarre. It's literally rewarding the criminal for not getting caught after the first incident and continuing to offend in the meantime.
What are the chances of a Parole Board member seeing the rape of their wife and two daughters as 'one incident' and acting accordingly?
 

Orbit v2

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Where does the parole board come into this? I don't understand what role they would have with sentencing and the linked article doesn't mention it.
 


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