Let's put Frisian aka 'Old English' onto the Leaving Cert syllabus.

Spirit Of Newgrange

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All the talk of learning classical languages from antiquity - Latin, Aramaic, Greek etc, is very interesting. A rounded education must surely involve familiarity with a few languages. And often these languages, especially Latin, will often enrich our command of English.

Norman French has added thousands of words to English. A familiarity of French will often be regarded as helping people read such texts as 'The Canterbury Tales' and anything by Shakespeare. It has been speculated that Shakespeare himself may have lived in Northern Italy and Denmark as his language is rich with influences from both areas. Was fluency in German not a big influence on the works of James Joyce ?

Any linguist will tell you that German is a fairly difficult language. The complex grammar and pronunciation make it a handful for any student. A great benefit from learning German is its feedback into one's English - also enriching it with an enhanced vocabulary of words from yesteryear. Also a useful aid to anybody reading Chaucer. However, Frisian is closer to Old English, has a homeland of half a million native speakers, easier grammar and a pronunciation closer to English. Frisian is the second official language of the Netherlands and additional to enriching one's English is actually a fairly easy language for beginners to learn. Go and live there for a month and live with a local family. This old language is in the very bones, the DNA of English. Didn't Seamus Heaney do a brilliant job on Beowulf ? This endeavour would honour his memory.

Another advantage, get fluent in easy Frisian and from thence you will find tackling difficult German slightly less daunting. Not to mention the massive advantage of being able to tackle difficult English texts from the Dark Ages through Medieval times and on into the likes of Emily Bronte or Charles Dickens.

Follow the links below and see what a great addition this language would be to the Leaving Cert. In terms of finding teachers, there are half a million of them within a short flight of Ireland. Plus soon we could get enough native irish teachers with Frisian good enough to hold a classroom's attentions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqeJn-MAC8Q
.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Frisian_language
.
https://ask.metafilter.com/169340/Which-languages-did-James-Joyce-know

try the translator below :

https://lingojam.com/EnglishToFrisian
 
Last edited:


Nordie Northsider

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I hate to break it to you, but I don't think you'll get many takers for this.
 

PAGE61

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Daft idea. Of course there should be a better emphasis on languages but ??
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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Friesian is part of the Agricultural Science syllabus. Why not teach Yola or Fingalian or Ulster Scots?
Ulster Scots is a joke, a creation just to stir up some friction. Show me the literature books or the area's with a majority of native speakers ?

Frisian is :
- An easy language to learn.
- alive and well
- of great interest to the antiquarian.
 

Clanrickard

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All the talk of learning classical languages from antiquity - Latin, Aramaic, Greek etc, is very interesting. A rounded education must surely involve familiarity with a few languages. And often these languages, especially Latin, will often enrich our command of English.

Norman French has added thousands of words to English. A familiarity of French will often be regarded as helping people read such texts as 'The Canterbury Tales' and anything by Shakespeare. It has been speculated that Shakespeare himself may have lived in Northern Italy and Denmark as his language is rich with influences from both areas. Was fluency in German not a big influence on the works of James Joyce ?

Any linguist will tell you that German is a fairly difficult language. The complex grammar and pronunciation make it a handful for any student. A great benefit from learning German is its feedback into one's English - also enriching it with an enhanced vocabulary of words from yesteryear. Also a useful aid to anybody reading Chaucer. However, Frisian is closer to Old English, has a homeland of half a million native speakers, easier grammar and a pronunciation closer to English. Frisian is the second official language of the Netherlands and additional to enriching one's English is actually a fairly easy language for beginners to learn. Go and live there for a month and live with a local family. This old language is in the very bones, the DNA of English. Didn't Seamus Heaney do a brilliant job on Beowulf ? This endeavour would honour his memory.

Another advantage, get fluent in easy Frisian and from thence you will find tackling difficult German slightly less daunting. Not to mention the massive advantage of being able to tackle difficult English texts from the Dark Ages through Medieval times and on into the likes of Emily Bronte or Charles Dickens.

Follow the links below and see what a great addition this language would be to the Leaving Cert. In terms of finding teachers, there are half a million of them within a short flight of Ireland. Plus soon we could get enough native irish teachers with Frisian good enough to hold a classroom's attentions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqeJn-MAC8Q
.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Frisian_language
.
https://ask.metafilter.com/169340/Which-languages-did-James-Joyce-know

 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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I don't think you'll get many takers for this.
Greek, Latin ? on the Leaving Cert. Not many takers. Still worth the effort for the few that could be bothered. Knowledge is beautiful.
 
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automaticforthepeople

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Ulster Scots is a joke, a creation just to stir up some friction. Show me the literature books or the area's with a majority of native speakers ?
Ye cannae say that about de mutter tung with ut quare ruckions on yon thread.

[video=youtube;Iey1mTOjT3E]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iey1mTOjT3E[/video]
 

recedite

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Yola is so Cool. One of the Local teachers round where I live studied it 30 years ago - apparently it isn't extinct
Yes, it may be a dead native language, but that hasn't been a problem for the gaeilge.
 


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