Light touch continuous assessment of projects without exam marks would encourage creativity


JimmyFoley

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Off topic, but I wonder whether anyone else has thought about this: do kids today read as much as kids did 20, 30, or 40 years ago? I'm talking about reading for 'pleasure', i.e. not reading books that are related to the school curriculum.

My impression is that they read nowhere near as much as I and most of my friends and family did in the 80s or 90s, but I could be completely mistaken in believing that, of course.
 

twokidsmanybruises

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Off topic, but I wonder whether anyone else has thought about this: do kids today read as much as kids did 20, 30, or 40 years ago? I'm talking about reading for 'pleasure', i.e. not reading books that are related to the school curriculum.

My impression is that they read nowhere near as much as I and most of my friends and family did in the 80s or 90s, but I could be completely mistaken in believing that, of course.
I'd say "yes", the kids who like reading today do read as much as the kids who liked reading 30 years ago. I'd say the difference though is that they mightn't be reading "books", as in print on paper and bound, and they read a lot of content that isn't in a 'book format", ie, articles, short stories etc.

The shift to screens from paper has effected everybody who reads a lot for either work or pleasure, and I do think this has had a detrimental effect on our eyes, but kids and teenagers, if fond of reading, are still stuffing themselves with the written word.
 

wombat

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My impression is that they read nowhere near as much as I and most of my friends and family did in the 80s or 90s, but I could be completely mistaken in believing that, of course.
I notice that the busiest section of the new library in Dun Laoghaire is the children's area, lots of mothers bringing their children to it in the mornings. Possibly teenagers don't read as much, certainly handwriting has deteriorated over the years but my guess is that there hasn't been any great change.
 

wombat

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The shift to screens from paper has effected everybody who reads a lot for either work or pleasure, and I do think this has had a detrimental effect on our eyes, but kids and teenagers, if fond of reading, are still stuffing themselves with the written word.
I'm surprised at the number of young people who prefer reading books, it seems that electronic readers are more popular with older folk - just an observation, I have nothing but personal experience to back it up.
 

JimmyFoley

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I'd say "yes", the kids who like reading today do read as much as the kids who liked reading 30 years ago. I'd say the difference though is that they mightn't be reading "books", as in print on paper and bound, and they read a lot of content that isn't in a 'book format", ie, articles, short stories etc.

The shift to screens from paper has effected everybody who reads a lot for either work or pleasure, and I do think this has had a detrimental effect on our eyes, but kids and teenagers, if fond of reading, are still stuffing themselves with the written word.
Thanks.
 

JimmyFoley

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I notice that the busiest section of the new library in Dun Laoghaire is the children's area, lots of mothers bringing their children to it in the mornings. Possibly teenagers don't read as much, certainly handwriting has deteriorated over the years but my guess is that there hasn't been any great change.
Ok. Thanks.

Funny the different impressions we have.
 

wombat

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Ok. Thanks.

Funny the different impressions we have.
We notice different things at different times, I go into the library several times a week, mostly to read newspapers or browse and one day I noticed how crowded the children's section was, since then I noticed the mothers bringing the children and they returning or borrowing books. Prior to that, I would have guessed that reading was in decline.
 

JimmyFoley

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We notice different things at different times, I go into the library several times a week, mostly to read newspapers or browse and one day I noticed how crowded the children's section was, since then I noticed the mothers bringing the children and they returning or borrowing books. Prior to that, I would have guessed that reading was in decline.
Do you think kids are reading as much in 'informal' settings, though? Long car journeys, going to bed at night, camping holidays, when it's raining outside etc etc.

Like I said before, maybe they are. I just don't see it.
 

JimmyFoley

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We notice different things at different times, I go into the library several times a week, mostly to read newspapers or browse and one day I noticed how crowded the children's section was, since then I noticed the mothers bringing the children and they returning or borrowing books. Prior to that, I would have guessed that reading was in decline.
Dp....
 

wombat

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Do you think kids are reading as much in 'informal' settings, though? Long car journeys, going to bed at night, camping holidays, when it's raining outside etc etc.

Like I said before, maybe they are. I just don't see it.
Young kids seem to be as keen as ever, maybe the interest fades quicker than in the past. I think that all the texting that goes on probably reduces your attention span over time but if you remember far back, people thought tha television would end reading.
 

JimmyFoley

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Young kids seem to be as keen as ever, maybe the interest fades quicker than in the past. I think that all the texting that goes on probably reduces your attention span over time but if you remember far back, people thought tha television would end reading.
No doubt. And that's why I'm always wary of the "Oh, in my generation, things were...." line.

Even still, I remain doubtful!
 

Patslatt1

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Off topic, but I wonder whether anyone else has thought about this: do kids today read as much as kids did 20, 30, or 40 years ago? I'm talking about reading for 'pleasure', i.e. not reading books that are related to the school curriculum.

My impression is that they read nowhere near as much as I and most of my friends and family did in the 80s or 90s, but I could be completely mistaken in believing that, of course.
I read a claim that the most literate society ever was Nazi Germany. Lack of distraction from TV, hard times in the 1930s and a good education system could explain that.
 

Patslatt1

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I'd say "yes", the kids who like reading today do read as much as the kids who liked reading 30 years ago. I'd say the difference though is that they mightn't be reading "books", as in print on paper and bound, and they read a lot of content that isn't in a 'book format", ie, articles, short stories etc.

The shift to screens from paper has effected everybody who reads a lot for either work or pleasure, and I do think this has had a detrimental effect on our eyes, but kids and teenagers, if fond of reading, are still stuffing themselves with the written word.
An anecdotal newspaper comment in the UK reported the general opinion of a group of young business people that the older generation are more literate. But perhaps less educated in technical business subjects?
 

Patslatt1

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I notice that the busiest section of the new library in Dun Laoghaire is the children's area, lots of mothers bringing their children to it in the mornings. Possibly teenagers don't read as much, certainly handwriting has deteriorated over the years but my guess is that there hasn't been any great change.
Handwriting improves hand to eye coordination. It could be improved with restoration of fountain pens with nibs.
 

Patslatt1

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I notice that the busiest section of the new library in Dun Laoghaire is the children's area, lots of mothers bringing their children to it in the mornings. Possibly teenagers don't read as much, certainly handwriting has deteriorated over the years but my guess is that there hasn't been any great change.
It's good that the Taj Mahal of suburban libraries is encouraging reading. But does it have a good book collection remotely related to the building cost?
 

toughbutfair

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I think it should be 100% exam. If the students aren’t strong enough to put up with the pressure they won’t make it in professional life anyway, even if they are intelligent. This culture of trying to protect 17 and 18 year olds is ridiculous.
 

Patslatt1

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Young kids seem to be as keen as ever, maybe the interest fades quicker than in the past. I think that all the texting that goes on probably reduces your attention span over time but if you remember far back, people thought tha television would end reading.
Texting should improve writing skills, even silly texts. The best way to improve writing skills is practice.
 

Patslatt1

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I think it should be 100% exam. If the students aren’t strong enough to put up with the pressure they won’t make it in professional life anyway, even if they are intelligent. This culture of trying to protect 17 and 18 year olds is ridiculous.
Giving credit for formal exam marks only doesn't rule out introducing CA without exam marks. Projects in research and manual skills could be done out of interest alone.
 

CatullusV

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I think it should be 100% exam. If the students aren’t strong enough to put up with the pressure they won’t make it in professional life anyway, even if they are intelligent. This culture of trying to protect 17 and 18 year olds is ridiculous.
The exam system could have been designed with me in mind. I've always sailed through the things as I'm good in those situations. However, I have plenty of friends who, while not exactly folding under the pressure, probably don't show just how good they can be in that scenario. Under continuous assessment, they would shine. I, on the other hand, would flop.

Maybe a compromise is possible.
 
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