• Due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software, some users were "banned" when they tried to change their passwords at the end of February. This does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you were affected by this, please contact us.



Living on garbage gases

Mrs. Crotta Cliach

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Messages
7,284
3,000 homes planned on Poolbeg site subject to landfill gas warnings

You just have to read this whole article to see how disasterous this deal is going to be:

3,000 homes planned on Poolbeg site subject to landfill gas warnings | Irish Examiner

"Concerns have been raised over the speed, cost, and the number of housing units that can be built under a plan to fast-track the construction of 3,000 homes in the Dublin Docklands area because of the potential threat of harmful landfill gases emitted on the derelict lands....
However, warnings first issued in 2009 have been reiterated after an investigation by the Irish Examiner into the legacy of the 34 hectares of the Poolbeg West lands, used since 1948 as a major tip for Dublin municipal waste....
Development of low-density housing with gardens directly on top of the site would present a risk from ground gas. This may be difficult to resolve with engineering measures....
However, the development of buildings with ventilated lower floors raised above ground level would be more acceptable and established engineering methods could be used to bring this risk within acceptable levels.”

The more I read, the scarier this gets. I certainly would never want to live on this site.
 


LISTOWEL MAN

Well-known member
Joined
May 14, 2013
Messages
11,789
our priorities are fu-ked up

that gorilla that was put down causes outrage

meanwhile obama murders women and children in Syria

people who had FA to do with the paris attacks
 

Spanner Island

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2011
Messages
24,203
3,000 homes planned on Poolbeg site subject to landfill gas warnings

You just have to read this whole article to see how disasterous this deal is going to be:

3,000 homes planned on Poolbeg site subject to landfill gas warnings | Irish Examiner

"Concerns have been raised over the speed, cost, and the number of housing units that can be built under a plan to fast-track the construction of 3,000 homes in the Dublin Docklands area because of the potential threat of harmful landfill gases emitted on the derelict lands....
However, warnings first issued in 2009 have been reiterated after an investigation by the Irish Examiner into the legacy of the 34 hectares of the Poolbeg West lands, used since 1948 as a major tip for Dublin municipal waste....
Development of low-density housing with gardens directly on top of the site would present a risk from ground gas. This may be difficult to resolve with engineering measures....
However, the development of buildings with ventilated lower floors raised above ground level would be more acceptable and established engineering methods could be used to bring this risk within acceptable levels.”

The more I read, the scarier this gets. I certainly would never want to live on this site.
This is the kind of sh!te you get when you've people demanding massive social housing schemes and quick fixes to everything... despite all the mistakes of the past and the consequences of those mistakes...

In a decade or two there'll be court cases about this if it happens...

We never ever learn in this country... or PLAN anything properly.

We just stumble from one f*** up to the next...
 

Burnout

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 7, 2009
Messages
7,276
Twitter
I have a life.
Ah the joy of being Irish....
 

GDPR

1
Joined
Jul 5, 2008
Messages
224,090
Before we jump on the bandwagon let's see what scheme they actually produce and how they intend to deal with the former landfill.
 

crossman

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 16, 2011
Messages
1,613
Before we jump on the bandwagon let's see what scheme they actually produce and how they intend to deal with the former landfill.
Exactly. There may be a problem but there are engineering solutions. We need to apply them and not rush into an ill thought out scheme. As usual the press will make a meal of any potential problem.
 

silverharp

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 21, 2015
Messages
15,942
they had that problem with the old Dublin town gas site beside the docks , they did a particular kind of treatment to sort it. nothing to see here me thinks
 

Watcher2

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2010
Messages
34,465
3,000 homes planned on Poolbeg site subject to landfill gas warnings

You just have to read this whole article to see how disasterous this deal is going to be:

3,000 homes planned on Poolbeg site subject to landfill gas warnings | Irish Examiner

"Concerns have been raised over the speed, cost, and the number of housing units that can be built under a plan to fast-track the construction of 3,000 homes in the Dublin Docklands area because of the potential threat of harmful landfill gases emitted on the derelict lands....
However, warnings first issued in 2009 have been reiterated after an investigation by the Irish Examiner into the legacy of the 34 hectares of the Poolbeg West lands, used since 1948 as a major tip for Dublin municipal waste....
Development of low-density housing with gardens directly on top of the site would present a risk from ground gas. This may be difficult to resolve with engineering measures....
However, the development of buildings with ventilated lower floors raised above ground level would be more acceptable and established engineering methods could be used to bring this risk within acceptable levels.”

The more I read, the scarier this gets. I certainly would never want to live on this site.
High rise should be the solution so a whole ground floor could be dedicated to ventilation of any gases emitted. The council should be sent back to revise their max height from 24 meters to whatever height would allow at least 15 floors. City centre should be all high rise and that site would be perfect for high rise in my view.
 

Watcher2

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2010
Messages
34,465
This is the kind of sh!te you get when you've people demanding massive social housing schemes and quick fixes to everything... despite all the mistakes of the past and the consequences of those mistakes...

In a decade or two there'll be court cases about this if it happens...

We never ever learn in this country... or PLAN anything properly.

We just stumble from one f*** up to the next...
I'm not sure why it should take a long time to come up with a plan. Surely the technologies are all there. We even used them for the Gas Works site but I suppose that would be too expensive in the current environment. Like I said in my previous post though, have some sense, revise the maximum heights, not just for this development, and use the ground floor to vent/collect/filter the gases. I'm not an engineer so there could be some flaws there but the article didn't make venting out to be a difficult or dangerous thing.
 

Roll_On

Well-known member
Joined
May 27, 2010
Messages
18,001
A non issue really. The same issue has been solved with considerable ease across the world. As an aside, the SDZ really needs to get a high rise element in there. Shadows from buildings on that site would be cast over the industrial area to the north and Dublin bay to the East in the evenings i.e. nobody to complain about being overshadowed. A 50 floor landmark would be great.
 

Spanner Island

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2011
Messages
24,203
I'm not sure why it should take a long time to come up with a plan. Surely the technologies are all there. We even used them for the Gas Works site but I suppose that would be too expensive in the current environment. Like I said in my previous post though, have some sense, revise the maximum heights, not just for this development, and use the ground floor to vent/collect/filter the gases. I'm not an engineer so there could be some flaws there but the article didn't make venting out to be a difficult or dangerous thing.
Absolutely - and increase them substantially in designated areas where high rise should be clustered - as tall buildings always look better when clustered.

And get some world class architects who have experience of proper dense urban living to design them and go from there.

But then when you've Dublin councillors whingeing and moaning about a housing crisis one minute and then voting to cap residential development heights at pathetic levels 'within the canals' the next... well... it seems to be let's have a bit of cake and eat it for those gobsh!tes... innit?

There is no reason in the world why a few areas couldn't be zoned for proper high rise... although I've no doubt they'd f*** it up regardless as they indulge their 'Dublin is a low rise city' obsession while solving nothing...

What they really should be ashamed of is how 'Dublin is a low density urban sprawling mess' of a city which their policies exacerbate.
 

Roll_On

Well-known member
Joined
May 27, 2010
Messages
18,001
Dublin City Council vote to increase max apartment heights

Eight-storey apartment blocks in Dublin approved - RTÉ News

Although only to a feable 8 storeys.

Interestingly the Green Party and PBP voted to restrict heights to Georgian era buildings. Funny that the Green Party favours urban sprawl(worst outcome for the natural environment) and PBP favours less homes built with more expensive price tags (worst outcome for the poor).

PBP are also spearheading a campaign in my area to have several derelict sites turned into parks(contrary to what greedy developers want). The same PBP want more social housing in these areas. You might ask how all that is possible. Now new land, no higher buildings yet more housing. And before you ask they won't accept social homes in other areas because a bus or luas journey from one part of Dublin to another to visit family would be too stressful according PBP.
 

Spanner Island

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2011
Messages
24,203
Dublin City Council vote to increase max apartment heights

Eight-storey apartment blocks in Dublin approved - RTÉ News

Although only to a feable 8 storeys.

Interestingly the Green Party and PBP voted to restrict heights to Georgian era buildings. Funny that the Green Party favours urban sprawl(worst outcome for the natural environment) and PBP favours less homes built with more expensive price tags (worst outcome for the poor).

PBP are also spearheading a campaign in my area to have several derelict sites turned into parks(contrary to what greedy developers want). The same PBP want more social housing in these areas. You might ask how all that is possible. Now new land, no higher buildings yet more housing. And before you ask they won't accept social homes in other areas because a bus or luas journey from one part of Dublin to another to visit family would be too stressful according PBP.
Pathetic... innit?

Playing catch up and still failing to do enough... as per feckin' usual...

Do these idiots even grasp the fact that higher limits 'outside the canals' only increases the price of all property while also fueling the number of people forced to live miles out who then have to commute in and out - an ongoing issue which has never been addressed effectively in Dublin?
 

Roll_On

Well-known member
Joined
May 27, 2010
Messages
18,001
The outside the canals bit is worrying, afterall the glass bottle site is 'outside the canals'. The glass bottle site should be reaching for the sky to take advantage of the low shadow impact. The Docklands SDZ should also be high rise, although perhaps with a circa 40 storey Cap.

Older parts of the City should have 10 storey blocks as the norm. Yes we know that they are taller than georgian houses, because they are over a hundred years old and we have modern housing needs. People in the Georgian era had no qualms about completely destroying previous generation's architecture. We can't even site modern architecture within eyeshot of the old.

Plenty of other cities can site modernity next to antiquity without the world ending.
 

Spanner Island

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2011
Messages
24,203
The outside the canals bit is worrying, afterall the glass bottle site is 'outside the canals'. The glass bottle site should be reaching for the sky to take advantage of the low shadow impact. The Docklands SDZ should also be high rise, although perhaps with a circa 40 storey Cap.

Older parts of the City should have 10 storey blocks as the norm. Yes we know that they are taller than georgian houses, because they are over a hundred years old and we have modern housing needs. People in the Georgian era had no qualms about completely destroying previous generation's architecture. We can't even site modern architecture within eyeshot of the old.

Plenty of other cities can site modernity next to antiquity without the world ending.
They can but I don't think London is doing it well tbh...

They were doing okay for a while there... with the Canary Wharf and City areas having clusters...

In the last while however, it's all gotten a bit sporadic with high rise popping up all over the place... and many more all along the Thames planned for the future...

Brussels is another example of zero planning... with ugly high rises dotted around the city whereas even the kind of ugly sh!te they've built there would look better if they were clustered...

American cities do clustering well by and large...

Any city wishing or needing to build up should do likewise... imo.
 

Harmonica

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 2, 2009
Messages
5,827
I am building on former waste land is common across the globe as long as done properly.

In Dublin planners are obsessed with no high rise because it runs the character of the city. have they seen most of the buildings in the city? Is it better to have low grade 4 story rubbish or higher quality taller buildings? I choose the later.

 

JCR

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 22, 2009
Messages
6,322
Absolutely - and increase them substantially in designated areas where high rise should be clustered - as tall buildings always look better when clustered.

And get some world class architects who have experience of proper dense urban living to design them and go from there.

But then when you've Dublin councillors whingeing and moaning about a housing crisis one minute and then voting to cap residential development heights at pathetic levels 'within the canals' the next... well... it seems to be let's have a bit of cake and eat it for those gobsh!tes... innit?

There is no reason in the world why a few areas couldn't be zoned for proper high rise... although I've no doubt they'd f*** it up regardless as they indulge their 'Dublin is a low rise city' obsession while solving nothing...

What they really should be ashamed of is how 'Dublin is a low density urban sprawling mess' of a city which their policies exacerbate.
Its not a question that Dublin outside of the immediate south city centre, which retains the thought out design and planning the Brits left behind, is a mess.

I have guess that the high rise issue is simply this - the players in the property area who can influence things need the land banks in zoned areas outside the city centre to further increase in value again. You start solving problems in Dublin with methods that don't suit these guys they fight it.

Ballsy now has his own show on RTE again. He is back shilling for developers, literally, I saw the segment of the show and RTE have given him the primetime slot to do it.
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top