Lloyd George's sympathy towards Hitler.

davidcameron

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During the 1930s, David Lloyd George, who was British PM from December 1916 to October 1922, was openly sympathetic towards Hitler.

Considering that the Nazis hated liberal politicians, why did Lloyd George, who was a former leader of the British Liberal Party, have so much time for Hitler? It doesn't make sense.
 


rainmaker

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During the 1930s, David Lloyd George, who was British PM from December 1916 to October 1922, was openly sympathetic towards Hitler.

Considering that the Nazis hated liberal politicians, why did Lloyd George, who was a former leader of the British Liberal Party, have so much time for Hitler? It doesn't make sense.
Do you have any links & supporting sources. Not disagreeing with the assertion of your OP, it would just help to flesh it out & give posters something to get their teeth into.
 

owedtojoy

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During the 1930s, David Lloyd George, who was British PM from December 1916 to October 1922, was openly sympathetic towards Hitler.

Considering that the Nazis hated liberal politicians, why did Lloyd George, who was a former leader of the British Liberal Party, have so much time for Hitler? It doesn't make sense.
Lloyd George was the British Petain ... being out of power for two decades, he turned defeatist and frustrated.

As is said "Power corrupts, Absolutely Power corrupts Absolutely, .... but Absence of Power, and the Hunger to regain it, can corrupt also".

Churchill wanted him to join his Cabinet. For one reason, he owed Lloyd George for bringing him back from exile in WWI, but more likely to keep a better eye on him. The Welsh Wizard refused, and told acquaintances that Churchill would not last long in office. No doubt he expected to be a contender.
 

McTell

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OP

Lots of people had time for hitler, because WW2 and the holocaust were unthinkable.

Our embassy was run by the unloveable Mr Bewley up to 1939...

 

Dame_Enda

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I think Lloyd George felt a bit guilty for the severity of the Versailles Treaty. Many in the British Establishment before WW2 felt that Germany had been treated too harshly, and that Communism was the real threat. The declining British aristocracy in particular felt like this for a while, including the then Duke of Wellington, and notoriously some the Mitford sisters (Unity Mitford and Diana Mosely), who were the daughters of Lord Reedsdale.
 

Golah veNekhar

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Our embassy was run by the unloveable Mr Bewley up to 1939...
People who actually knew him found him deeply lovable, admirable even, despite his flaws.
 

McTell

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People who actually knew him found him deeply lovable, admirable even, despite his flaws.

Of course his boyfriends didn't find him unloveable. Unlikeable?
 

silverharp

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I think Lloyd George felt a bit guilty for the severity of the Versailles Treaty. Many in the British Establishment before WW2 felt that Germany had been treated too harshly, and that Communism was the real threat. The declining British aristocracy in particular felt like this for a while, including the then Duke of Wellington, and notoriously some the Mitford sisters (Unity Mitford and Diana Mosely), who were the daughters of Lord Reedsdale.
I always thought Mosley was a barrow boy , but he was quite the posh lad ,inherited a baronetcy, sound on the Irish question though
 

davidcameron

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Do you have any links & supporting sources. Not disagreeing with the assertion of your OP, it would just help to flesh it out & give posters something to get their teeth into.
OK - apart from Wikipedia, there is a book that was written by World War 2 veteran the late Tom Freeman-Keel, "From Auschwitz to Alderney and Beyond".

Lloyd George's daughter, Megan, was on the list in the Nazis' 'Black Book' but Lloyd George himself wasn't.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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Considering that the Nazis hated liberal politicians, why did Lloyd George, who was a former leader of the British Liberal Party, have so much time for Hitler? It doesn't make sense.
Maybe the clue to the answer of that question, is in the opening declaration:

During the 1930s, David Lloyd George, who was British PM from December 1916 to October 1922, was openly sympathetic towards Hitler.
Perhaps for Hitler it meant that British Parliamentary Liberalism was a key tenet of the British Colonial Enterprise in Ireland, a part of what Pearse defined as the Broad Arrow. Maybe he viewed it as another of Britains many political instruments and colonial tools which it used to subjugate and oppress the Irish people. Perhaps Hitler understood that he needed to incorporate Liberalism into the Nazi Colonial Project, and that way, the friendship does in fact 'make sense.' British Liberalism and Nazism were birds of a feather, and Hitler just upped the ante. There's a cigarette-paper between Hitlers treatment of the Jews and the Roma Gypsies, and the treatment meted out to their predecessors in the England of Henry VIII - The Tudors Bring Back Slavery
 

davidcameron

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Maybe the clue to the answer of that question, is in the opening declaration:



Perhaps for Hitler it meant that British Parliamentary Liberalism was a key tenet of the British Colonial Enterprise in Ireland, a part of what Pearse defined as the Broad Arrow. Maybe he viewed it as another of Britains many political instruments and colonial tools which it used to subjugate and oppress the Irish people. Perhaps Hitler understood that he needed to incorporate Liberalism into the Nazi Colonial Project, and that way, the friendship does in fact 'make sense.' British Liberalism and Nazism were birds of a feather, and Hitler just upped the ante. There's a cigarette-paper between Hitlers treatment of the Jews and the Roma Gypsies, and the treatment meted out to their predecessors in the England of Henry VIII - The Tudors Bring Back Slavery
But it doesn't make sense for a British political party to act differently in terms of ideology outside Britain from how it does in Britain, i.e. if you're being liberal in your own country then you'll be liberal towards other countries, right?!
 

Clanrickard

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Antóin Mac Comháin

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But it doesn't make sense for a British political party to act differently in terms of ideology outside Britain from how it does in Britain, i.e. if you're being liberal in your own country then you'll be liberal towards other countries, right?!
The friendship only makes sense, when you view it through Hitlers lens. As per his external behavior, and his adoption of the British Liberal Party machine as an ally, internally, Hitler also adopted the Liberal Parliamentary Political machine in Germany, as a means to an end. He was flexible. Do you suppose we define his subsequent behavior towards the British and the Russians as 'Liberal?' If you must..
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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if you're being liberal in your own country then you'll be liberal towards other countries, right?!
There's a very thin-line between the Munich Games and a Pride Rally, in the sense that the Olympics were Hitlers way of showing the mob his 'inner-Liberal.' The only thing in history which resembles Nazism is North Korea. However, in the absence of a leader with Hitlers personality, there's not even a remote possibility of a repeat. The moral of the story isn't that Liberals are Nazi's, but that Nazi's can be Liberals..
 

davidcameron

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The friendship only makes sense, when you view it through Hitlers lens. As per his external behavior, and his adoption of the British Liberal Party machine as an ally, internally, Hitler also adopted the Liberal Parliamentary Political machine in Germany, as a means to an end. He was flexible. Do you suppose we define his subsequent behavior towards the British and the Russians as 'Liberal?' If you must..
But the German parliamentary political machine was - and is today - the system of government. Therefore, your comparison doesn't make sense because the British Liberal Party was a political party, not a system of government.
 


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