Luck of the Irish? USA halts imports of Brazilian beef.

Wascurito

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 18, 2017
Messages
7,298
From an Irish point of view, the timing couldn't be more fortuitous. The very same week in which Irish beef was awarded a quality shield by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), that same USDA has banned imports of Brazilian beef.

The Irish have been ahead of the curve in the USA since 2015 being the first EU country whose beef was allowed into the USA.

The reputation of Brazilian beef has been badly damaged in the last few years with allegations of serious malpractice at meat plants. While Ireland simply doesn't have the volumes to replace the huge South American country in the US beef market, it does seem that Brazil's difficulty is Ireland's opportunity.

RTÉ News: US halts Brazil beef imports, citing safety concerns
 


ger12

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
47,680
Rare, medium or well done?
 

PC Principle

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 12, 2016
Messages
4,828
Exporting beef to America is like trying to sell oil to the Arabs.


.
Except it's not.

It's actually easier to sell booze to the Irish ironically, despite, you know.......
 

storybud1

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 25, 2011
Messages
6,531
Rare, medium or well done?
Rare is best, obviously,

Get a fully traceable Irish Angus steak, cook it rare , unbelievable,, (just go with it, 21 days hung etc)

Quality will always be sought after, we can do somethings better than 90% + of the rest of the world,

The ancient Irish knew this was a perfect Country for beef, pity the rest of the world does not get our quality,,
 

lostexpectation

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 3, 2006
Messages
14,117
Website
dublinstreams.blogspot.com
From an Irish point of view, the timing couldn't be more fortuitous. The very same week in which Irish beef was awarded a quality shield by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), that same USDA has banned imports of Brazilian beef.

The Irish have been ahead of the curve in the USA since 2015 being the first EU country whose beef was allowed into the USA.

The reputation of Brazilian beef has been badly damaged in the last few years with allegations of serious malpractice at meat plants. While Ireland simply doesn't have the volumes to replace the huge South American country in the US beef market, it does seem that Brazil's difficulty is Ireland's opportunity.

RTÉ News: US halts Brazil beef imports, citing safety concerns
anyone have details of what ongoing inspections the US is doing of Irish beef
 

Mad as Fish

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 6, 2012
Messages
24,185
anyone hahttp://www.politics.ie/forum/economy/257388-luck-irish-usa-halts-imports-brazilian-beef.html#post11268028ve details of what ongoing inspections the US is doing of Irish beef
This story has been bubbling on for a while now and has been mentioned on P.ie several times over the last few months. The Brazilian meat industry is in serious trouble with allegations and arrests over corruption in the inspection of the not just beef but poultry as well. Its what happens when people pretend not to notice the brown envelopes being passed around.

Thankfully Ireland has an excellent beef industry despite the crap voiced here by the anti farming brigade, and we are well placed to take advantage of Brazil's misfortune.
 

PC Principle

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 12, 2016
Messages
4,828
Rare is best, obviously,

Get a fully traceable Irish Angus steak, cook it rare , unbelievable,, (just go with it, 21 days hung etc)

Quality will always be sought after, we can do somethings better than 90% + of the rest of the world,

The ancient Irish knew this was a perfect Country for beef, pity the rest of the world does not get our quality,,
Sorry bro, as much as I like a good Irish steak I had my best in the USA, Argentina, Japan and Brazil.

I fine-dine at least 4 times a month on red meat and I consider myself very knowledgeable on this topic from first hand experience.
 

mac tíre

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 19, 2011
Messages
8,289
Larry Goodman jnr rubs his hands.
 

Lumpy Talbot

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
28,990
Twitter
No
Difficult to tell in the United States the quality of meat as it invariably comes slathered in a concoction of a sauce which is usually just another way of getting copious amounts of sugar into a meal.

The effects of the corruption scandals in Brazil are interesting to watch and they have come from one legislative change some years ago when one of the parties dropped a horrific clanger from Brazilian politics' point of view and introduced plea-bargaining to the Brazilian federal statue book.

It opened the door to a cascade of deals made by people facing jail sentences on pissy mattresses who would have walked away scot-free from corruption scandals years ago.

The plea-bargaining system has resulted in judges, four of the main political parties, bent coppers and a slew of major businesses being caught up in a net of corruption charges that has really lifted the lid on the corrupt nexus between business and politics and the judiciary in the country.

If I recall my reading it is all traceable back to one company official being shown the cell he would be enjoying for years by a copper who turned out to be immune to blandishments, threats and offers of bribes. That one businessman started talking and caused an avalanche of cases right across the corporate spectrum in the state.

Plea-bargaining along with a RICO Act (Racketeering in Concert with Others) is something I have suggested on Irish corruption related threads would really expose the real levels of corruption in Ireland in the same way they have been exposed in Brazil.

In Brazil they had the sanctions necessary on the books but until plea-bargaining was introduced the sanctions were mostly toothless as corruption was mostly unprosecuted.

In Ireland the necessary sanctions don't exist on the statute book, nor does the principle of plea-bargaining or a RICO Act.

And that is precisely what allows the corrupt in Ireland to claim there are low levels of corruption in Ireland.

A change along Brazilian lines and Ireland could be cleaned up as regards corruption probably within five to ten years.
 

greagh

Well-known member
Joined
May 28, 2011
Messages
422
Sorry bro, as much as I like a good Irish steak I had my best in the USA, Argentina, Japan and Brazil.

I fine-dine at least 4 times a month on red meat and I consider myself very knowledgeable on this topic from first hand experience.
Have to concur, Ireland has the ideal conditions to produce great steak but at the insistence of Larry Goodman continues to breed continental type cattle which yield huge quantities of lean meat sold cheaply in UK supermarkets ,whereas the countries you mentioned breed smaller traditional type cows which produce less more marbled beef which is much more tasty and tender and occupies the top end of the market
 

Uganda

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 17, 2013
Messages
9,577
From an Irish point of view, the timing couldn't be more fortuitous. The very same week in which Irish beef was awarded a quality shield by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), that same USDA has banned imports of Brazilian beef.

The Irish have been ahead of the curve in the USA since 2015 being the first EU country whose beef was allowed into the USA.

The reputation of Brazilian beef has been badly damaged in the last few years with allegations of serious malpractice at meat plants. While Ireland simply doesn't have the volumes to replace the huge South American country in the US beef market, it does seem that Brazil's difficulty is Ireland's opportunity.

RTÉ News: US halts Brazil beef imports, citing safety concerns
Well done Coveney on getting this deal across the line in time.

Nevertheless I expect gobby McDonald to pop up shortly with her usual carping and whining.
 

lostexpectation

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 3, 2006
Messages
14,117
Website
dublinstreams.blogspot.com

Wascurito

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 18, 2017
Messages
7,298
I've seen report of inspections that are US inspections of the Irish inspection regime, Im wondering if there ongoing inspections by the USDA in Ireland

USDA Approves Irish Beef - InsideStandards
That article (from Feb 2015) states the following:
The U.K. is due have its slaughter facilities undergo the USDA food safety standard audit within the next few months.

Given that Ireland is still the only EU country to have passed the USDA inspection audit, presumably the Brits failed that test.
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top