Make this next general election count

Urmentor

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It seems to me that we as the people have never had more power in terms of who we elect into our next government.
More promises will be made by more parties than ever before. But whoever we vote in will operate under same system.
Minsters will still draw their state pensions if they decide to retire before 65 and they will still be able to claim unvouched expenses.
All the while school classes will still operate out of prefabs, Cystic fibrosis patients will still have no wards to themselves and when the big freeze comes upon us next we will get the same old lark about there being a shortage on grit.
What do we do. We establish a charter where budgets are accountable and politicians can not expect us to bear the pain while they milk a disgustingly corrupt system which belittles our republic.
If you let a politician up your garden path seek guarentees that will benefit us all. Not I want the path outside my door fixed.
We must get out of "the all politics is local" mode where one constituency gets its hospital or whatever and others suffer.
As stated this election will probably matter more than any other in the history of this state.
There are good politicians out there but many lack the courage or moral conviction to change a corrupt system.
High level civil servants have had their salaries increased.
Above all else politicians must be asked at every doorstep whether they are prepared to take a wage decrease for the sake of the future of this state.
Only then will we know their true worth.
 


DuineEile

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I will not be voting in the coming election. Politicians fail into one or more of the falling categories: clueless, corrupt, incompotent and/or liars.
That works for me as you don't complain about the Govt. for the length of an Dáil where you didn't vote.

D
 

Merovingian

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All the while school classes will still operate out of prefabs, Cystic fibrosis patients will still have no wards to themselves and when the big freeze comes upon us next we will get the same old lark about there being a shortage on grit.
QUOTE]

I was educated in an Irish prefab and ended up at Harvard. Quality of the teacher thats important - whether you are surrounded by brick and mortar or prefabricated plywood doesn't matter a damn. Plus chasing mice made for an amusing diversion during those dreary Gaeilge lessons.
Can't disagree with you about the TD's pensions before 65..they're not prensioners ffs. Our treatment or lack thereof of cystic fibrosis suffers when we have the highest per capita incidence in the world is shameful. We should be leading the world in this field. However, so long as we want an A&E in every back garden and apparently we do, then this is what we will get.
 

Mossy Heneberry

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That works for me as you don't complain about the Govt. for the length of an Dáil where you didn't vote.

D
If you think your vote matters, think again. The unions, special interests, senior civil servants and consultants control the show.

We are but mere pawns in their circus.
 

cricket

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I've always believed that voting should be compulsory , with a " none of the above " box and stiff fines for those who don't vote without good reason.
I also believe that , now more than ever , it's essential that people don't vote for independents or small parties or groupings. What we need is a viable , secure , responsive government , not one that stays in office thanks to promises of airports , hospitals , casinos in remote areas just to keep some jumped up county councillor sweet.
 

Mossy Heneberry

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I've always believed that voting should be compulsory , with a " none of the above " box and stiff fines for those who don't vote without good reason.
I also believe that , now more than ever , it's essential that people don't vote for independents or small parties or groupings. What we need is a viable , secure , responsive government , not one that stays in office thanks to promises of airports , hospitals , casinos in remote areas just to keep some jumped up county councillor sweet.
So you are willing to use violence against a person because they didn't vote?
 

Urmentor

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And as we speak this from todays Sindos. Politicians are continually lying to us. They can't be trusted.
The highlighted paragraph says it all. Someone come up with a valid reason why we should vote for anyone who treats the job as a cash cow and gives banks carte blanche to sign blank cheques for its senior staff.

Generous retirement payouts prompt cabinet colleagues to consider following Ahern's lead

Speculation is growing that a number of cabinet members are considering following Justice Minister Dermot Ahern's footsteps into political retirement, lured by the prospect of generous golden handshake package for ministers and TDs.

Severance payments and pension payoffs totalling €7m will be paid by taxpayers to departing ministers and TDs after the next General Election, the Sunday Independent can reveal.

In a further affront to public sensitivity, three of the country's bust banks -- AIB, Bank of Ireland and Anglo Irish Bank -- have awarded themselves €70m in bonuses and pay rises since last year. Middle- and lower-income earners will bear the brunt of the €6bn Budget on Tuesday, yet taxpayers will foot the multi-million euro bill to cushion ministers and TDs set to retire or lose their seat.Members would be substantially better off by retiring, rather than remaining on as a backbencher.Twelve members of the Cabinet -- Brian Cowen; Dermot Ahern; Brian Lenihan; Mary Coughlan; Mary Harney; Mary Hanafin; Noel Dempsey; Micheal Martin; Eamon O Cuiv; Batt O'Keeffe; Tony Killeen; and Brendan Smith -- would receive golden handshakes of between €302,500 and €352,454 and annual pensions of €91,000-€120,000 a year for the rest of their lives, should they exit politics at the next election.

And ministers John Gormley, Eamon Ryan and Pat Carey could receive in excess of €286,000 each were they to resign or lose their seat.

Separately, despite the taxpayer footing a bailout bill of €50bn, it has emerged that AIB paid bonuses of almost €60m to its staff since January 2009. This was on top of €10m worth of pay increases to key staff during the same period.

Worse still, Anglo, the institution which has contributed more than any other to Ireland's demise, increased pay by 5 per cent to staff in 2009 and paid bonuses to 15 staff members since January last year.

And 4 per cent of staff at Bank of Ireland received bonuses that were deferred until this year.





Golden goodbyes lure for ministers - National News, Frontpage - Independent.ie
 

DuineEile

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If you think your vote matters, think again. The unions, special interests, senior civil servants and consultants control the show.

We are but mere pawns in their circus.
Middle class areas vote more heavily than working class areas. They make more fuss about things. So things get done for their areas that don't get done in working class areas.

Apathy leads to being ignored.


D
 

ocoonassa

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That works for me as you don't complain about the Govt. for the length of an Dáil where you didn't vote.

D
Er...surely it's the people who vote for incompetent and corrupt governments and the corrupt and incompetent opposition who have no right to complain? People who didn't vote aren't responsible in any way for what happens in the Oireachtas and therefore have every right to complain. On the other hand people who give their mandate to a patently corrupt and useless political system forfeit that right. If you made your bed you must lie in it etc.
 

Mossy Heneberry

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Yes, violence. What happens to someone who doesn't vote and refuses to pay the fine?


Middle class areas vote more heavily than working class areas. They make more fuss about things. So things get done for their areas that don't get done in working class areas.

Apathy leads to being ignored.
More than likely they have their connections to fall back on. Who you know and all that.
 

Urmentor

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Middle class areas vote more heavily than working class areas. They make more fuss about things. So things get done for their areas that don't get done in working class areas.

Apathy leads to being ignored.


D
That is not always the case. There was a case of school down in the country who campaigned for school to be upgraded to a new site and as a result they were put right down to the bottom of list.
I can see the same thing happening where TDS will reward those they perceive to be for them and ignore those who they perceive to be against them.
The way forward I see is to shorten the amount of sitting tds and increase competitiveness.
Far too many at the moment.
 

Venceremos

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great to see this. I was wondering about circulating a simple Word document to print off for windows saying "if you promise to work hard for this area you won't get our votes. Tell me how you will turn the country round". Suggestions on wording improvements welcome.
 

DuineEile

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great to see this. I was wondering about circulating a simple Word document to print off for windows saying "if you promise to work hard for this area you won't get our votes. Tell me how you will turn the country round". Suggestions on wording improvements welcome.
Wording seems good to me.

D
 

MDaniel

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great to see this. I was wondering about circulating a simple Word document to print off for windows saying "if you promise to work hard for this area you won't get our votes. Tell me how you will turn the country round". Suggestions on wording improvements welcome.
Could this be started as a thread? Wouldn't like to do it (if I can). This is Venceremos's idea.
 

Luigi Vampa

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I will not be voting in the coming election
I've heard a lot of cradle to the grave FF voters say exactly that, as they seem to fear what long gone dead relatives might think, and will not vote for anyone other than FF.

It is you're democratic right not to vote, and that should be fully supported. However, in reality it is a very foolish choice, because effectively you're giving your vote away and letting some gobsheen decide for you - at least cancel their vote out by voting.
 
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cathal201

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The general election in the spring is crucial for this nation. We need everyone to vote, no matter who you vote for, because lets face it we are in a massive crisis and everyone needs to have their say.

In my opinion, it is vital that Fianna Fail are punished for what they have done to this country. They have destroyed an economy that was handed over to them, by the last FG government, which was in good condition. They have abused their power over the past 13 years, they have appointed Fianna Fail'ers to state boards and have looked after their friends in the building and banking sector very well. Brian Lenihan stated that to bail out his and Fianna Fails friends in the banks would be the "cheapest bailout ever". 29.3 billion later only one thing is clear - This guy and Fianna Fail are a shower of compulsive liers.

What I believe is fundamental in this election is we as an electorate take our opportunity. The opportunity is there in front of us, which is the opportunity to change the political landscape in Ireland for a generation, and for the better. We need to savage Fianna Fail at the polls, and make sure they are as close to dead and gone as we can get them when the the votes are in. For the sake of the children and grandchildren of this generation Fianna Fail has to become a minnow in Irish politics.

Also, we need to restore honesty and trust into politics. We have been told lie after lie by Fianna Fail, and for this alone they should suffer. And, if the government that forms after this election fails to do their duty, then we shall have our say in due course.
 

Mossy Heneberry

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I've heard a lot of cradle to the grave FF voters say exactly that, as they seem to fear long gone dead relatives might think, and will not vote for anyone other than FF.

It is your democratic right not to vote, and that should be fully supported. However, in reality it is a very foolish choice, because effectively your giving your vote away and letting some gobsheen decide for you - at least cancel their vote out by voting.
I hope you are not suggesting that I'm a cradle to grave FF... anyways, maybe I'll deliberately spoil my vote.
 

Urmentor

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The decision not to vote is a vote in itself. Im pretty sure many will spoil their votes anyway.
The bank guarentee has been proved to a big lie. Very little money has been lent out and as stated in that article posted yesterday, Bankers have continued to reward themselves with bonuses.
I find it amazing that outgoing ministers are walking away with golden handshakes and playing the illness and more time with family cards and not being challenged on it.
Mary O'Rourke said the other day that the reduction in jobless figures was good news.She wasnt challenged on fact that emigration had not been factored into it.
I am seriously hoping that our national broadcaster does not let FF away with it this time.
 


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