Many of the most memorable photos of my childhood and family were taken at the Twelfth

McSlaggart

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The year 2020 will be remembered as the year when the best-laid plans were set to one side to help contain Covid-19.

While today is July 13, for as long as I can remember, the Twelfth parade has taken place. Many of the most memorable photos of my childhood and family were taken at the Twelfth; this year should be no different for our children and young people.

The children may not be holding the banner strings, or daddy's hand, in the parade, but let's work together as families to create lasting memories of the year the Twelfth was at home.

I commend the Orange Order membership, not only for their leadership in discouraging mass gatherings, but also in the support role that the Orange family have played in the community.

As an organisation grounded in the scriptures, the institution has certainly matched their prayers with actions to support frontline workers and help the vulnerable by delivering meals, or placing a friendly phone call to people who were shielding. People of all faiths and none were given vital support.


It should always be remembered that certain things are taken not for what they are but in the "remembrance of things past". I would have had a tendency to berate the orange order for its inability to change and to adjust to the realities of its membership and buildings. In a northern Ireland in which ex IRA people can hold official office in the "government", its loss at Drumcree and ended up looking desperate in a caravans in north Belfast halting site.

The question for unionism / orange is how do they change their culture to meet a world in which they must co-exist with nationalism? Older nationalists tolerated unionists going a bit daft" around the 12th. In places like Tyrone nationalists hardly notice unionism existence.
 


Levellers

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The theme this - in fact every year - is kill all Catholics. Nice family day.

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McSlaggart

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The theme this - in fact every year - is kill all Catholics. Nice family day.

Like all holidays it can mean many things to different people. The parading culture is one of bands with little of no spectators.

The "12" is the one day in which an ever decreasing crowd does turn up. To misquote "Johnston" the 12 is "Worth seeing, yes; but not worth going to see." Mostly it is like an Irish dancing event with children and old people the spectators. {Girls do turn up to see the boys}
 

Dame_Enda

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devonish

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This reminds me of certain rugby league supporters who fly into a rage whenever rugby union is mentioned. But even they would refrain from calling it intimidation. :LOL:
I'm guessing that if a nationalist was, say working with 10 Linfield supporters and conversation was dominated by discussion of said team then the nationalist may feel, if not intimidated, at least somewhat excluded?
 

Lumpy Talbot

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That's hopelessly optimistic. You wouldn't even get 10 Linfield supporters talking about Linfield at a Linfield home game.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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There's definitely something wrong in one's chosen living environment if one's family photo album consists mostly of CCTV coverage of paramilitary funerals. 'Oh look there's little Jimmy with his first petrol bomb. Wasn't he cute though with the little Zippo he had for Christmas '71'.
 

milipod

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There's definitely something wrong in one's chosen living environment if one's family photo album consists mostly of CCTV coverage of paramilitary funerals. 'Oh look there's little Jimmy with his first petrol bomb. Wasn't he cute though with the little Zippo he had for Christmas '71'?
Zippo luxury.
 

Mickeymac

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That's hopelessly optimistic. You wouldn't even get 10 Linfield supporters talking about Linfield at a Linfield home game.

Such AH’s do not do sport, they are only in it to spread hatred/division/conflict to other areas and if anyone thinks they discuss sport😂 hope they have a nice day😂
 

AhNowStop

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I'm guessing that if a nationalist was, say working with 10 Linfield supporters and conversation was dominated by discussion of said team then the nationalist may feel, if not intimidated, at least somewhat excluded?
Why would you?
 

raetsel

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I'm guessing that if a nationalist was, say working with 10 Linfield supporters and conversation was dominated by discussion of said team then the nationalist may feel, if not intimidated, at least somewhat excluded?
It would rarely be that pronounced these days, but I've been in similar, smaller groups, with 3 or 4 Protestant workmates/friends discussing something normal to them which I, by my background was naturally excluded from but of course knew it wasn't intentional. These scenarios happen. I listened and learned a bit and sometimes asked questions. I've always had an ability to fit in and not worry too much about the accidental/circumstantial differences.
Deliberate exclusion is something else.
 

Glaucon

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I'm guessing that if a nationalist was, say working with 10 Linfield supporters and conversation was dominated by discussion of said team then the nationalist may feel, if not intimidated, at least somewhat excluded?
Perhaps. But stick a cricket-loving Brit around 10 Americans talking incessantly about the NFL and it'd surely be the same. It's hardly latent intimidation to talk about Linfield, the Green Bay Packers or Fermanagh GAA.
 

Paddyc

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I'm guessing that if a nationalist was, say working with 10 Linfield supporters and conversation was dominated by discussion of said team then the nationalist may feel, if not intimidated, at least somewhat excluded?
Would they all be living in county Linfield?
 

McSlaggart

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I'm guessing that if a nationalist was, say working with 10 Linfield supporters and conversation was dominated by discussion of said team then the nationalist may feel, if not intimidated, at least somewhat excluded?
What you are on about ::

However, MLA Rosemary Barton has said the prospect of the victory has led to some feeling under pressure and "deeply uncomfortable" when the subject was raised in the workplace with them not reporting the matter for "fear of reprisals".

She asked passionate GAA supporters to "respect their friends and work colleagues" as they may not have the same interest in the organisation and "their actions can leave their work colleagues feeling apprehensive"."



You think that sporting conversations should not be discussed at work?
 


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