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Mapping the brain


Hewson

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Apr 29, 2009
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8,337
This is a brain scan with a difference.

Scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital are working on a project that will produce the first detailed map of the human brain. When completed, this will be an enormous help in furthering scientists' understanding of how the brain works (it's still the world's most complex computer), what causes particular illnesses like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's and whether particular individuals may be susceptible to these and other illnesses.

It's also hoped that these scans will give some guidance as to why certain people have a natural talent for the arts or science or music.

But it's in the area of medical research that this technology could make a real difference.

[video]http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/science-environment-21489097[/video]
 


Bea C

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Jul 1, 2010
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They can take a shot of my brain if they want - try and figure it out.
 

Hewson

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They can take a shot of my brain if they want - try and figure it out.
I'd be happy to be a guinea pig for this.


The human brain is unique. Although it's not the largest, it gives us the power to speak, imagine and problem solve. It is truly an amazing organ.

The brain performs an incredible number of tasks including the following:

It controls body temperature, blood pressure, heart rate and breathing.
It accepts a flood of information about the world around you from your various senses (seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting and touching).
It handles your physical movement when walking, talking, standing or sitting.
It lets you think, dream, reason and experience emotions.

All of these tasks are coordinated, controlled and regulated by an organ that is about the size of a small head of cauliflower.
 

lying eyes

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Apr 27, 2009
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They should try it on all Irish politicians, it would put no stress on the machine, cause there is feck all in there.......ah just to confirm what we already know.......
 

Half Nelson

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Joined
Dec 12, 2009
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21,692
This is a brain scan with a difference.

Scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital are working on a project that will produce the first detailed map of the human brain. When completed, this will be an enormous help in furthering scientists' understanding of how the brain works (it's still the world's most complex computer), what causes particular illnesses like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's and whether particular individuals may be susceptible to these and other illnesses.

It's also hoped that these scans will give some guidance as to why certain people have a natural talent for the arts or science or music.

But it's in the area of medical research that this technology could make a real difference.

[video]http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/science-environment-21489097[/video]
It's nothing like a computer, or I should say - a computer is nothing like a brain.
The brain of a midge can outperform the most advanced computer on board a fly-by-wire aircraft, so imagine how far we are from understanding or replicating the human brain, wherein lies the human mind (maybe).
 

Hewson

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Apr 29, 2009
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It's nothing like a computer, or I should say - a computer is nothing like a brain.
The brain of a midge can outperform the most advanced computer on board a fly-by-wire aircraft, so imagine how far we are from understanding or replicating the human brain, wherein lies the human mind (maybe).
The computer analogy is a tad dated but it's how many of us get a handle on something so unique in its complexity that it's hard to put into words.

It's also base camp for the human mind, that bundle of emotions, thoughts rational and irrational, where people create their own, and sometimes others', heaven and hell.
 

Radix

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Aug 31, 2010
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10,030
This is a brain scan with a difference.

Scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital are working on a project that will produce the first detailed map of the human brain. When completed, this will be an enormous help in furthering scientists' understanding of how the brain works (it's still the world's most complex computer), what causes particular illnesses like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's and whether particular individuals may be susceptible to these and other illnesses.

It's also hoped that these scans will give some guidance as to why certain people have a natural talent for the arts or science or music.

But it's in the area of medical research that this technology could make a real difference.

[video]http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/science-environment-21489097[/video]


Clicked your link, and it came up blank. :)

Seriously though, as this is so beautiful in its complexity, would it be possible to offer up Ivor Callely as a participant in this mapping project?

And while we're at it, given the sheer miracle that life seems to be in the way we develop from the beginning, could this research shed new light on our brains' development in the wombs of our mothers? For example, some research projects have shown that babies react to music their mothers listened to before they were born.

Good thread btw Hewson.
 

Hewson

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Apr 29, 2009
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Clicked your link, and it came up blank. :)

Seriously though, as this is so beautiful in its complexity, would it be possible to offer up Ivor Callely as a participant in this mapping project?

And while we're at it, given the sheer miracle that life seems to be in the way we develop from the beginning, could this research shed new light on our brains' development in the wombs of our mothers? For example, some research projects have shown that babies react to music their mothers listened to before they were born.

Good thread btw Hewson.
Blank? I've just clicked it again and it works fine. Sorry about that.

Try again. BBC News - Mind mapping: Inside the brain's wiring
 

Hewson

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Apr 29, 2009
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Clicked your link, and it came up blank. :)

Seriously though, as this is so beautiful in its complexity, would it be possible to offer up Ivor Callely as a participant in this mapping project?

And while we're at it, given the sheer miracle that life seems to be in the way we develop from the beginning, could this research shed new light on our brains' development in the wombs of our mothers? For example, some research projects have shown that babies react to music their mothers listened to before they were born.

Good thread btw Hewson.
Before my son was born my pregnant wife used to sit in the lounge with Beethoven's 6th Symphony on the stereo, convinced that it had a calming influence on the child.

It invariably started kicking madly. But this might be down to my own preferences for rock music.

Either way, he's out in the world now. A successful computer geek!
 

Radix

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Before my son was born my pregnant wife used to sit in the lounge with Beethoven's 6th Symphony on the stereo, convinced that it had a calming influence on the child.

He invariably started kicking madly. But this might be down to my own preferences for rock music.

Either way, he's out in the world now. A successful computer geek!

Your dear wife was probably trying to calm you down with your high tempo tastes, given the way the minds of our fairer sex operate! :)

With regard to Beethoven's 6th Symphony now, does young Hewson have a problem?

It is also interesting that his Dad has an interest in neural networks, while he has an interest in computer networks; a kind of unity between the spiritual and the physical within the one family and possibly vice versa if you could tell me.

We always play music for our cows when they are being milked, they seem to love it, have high yields, better health, are more docile, and there is a scientific basis for this also apparently.

Listening to the (Pastoral) Symphony now by the way, prompted by your thread.

BBC News | SCI/TECH | Sweet music for milking
 

Hewson

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Apr 29, 2009
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Your dear wife was probably trying to calm you down with your high tempo tastes, given the way the minds of our fairer sex operate! :)

With regard to Beethoven's 6th Symphony now, does young Hewson have a problem?

It is also interesting that his Dad has an interest in neural networks, while he has an interest in computer networks; a kind of unity between the spiritual and the physical within the one family and possibly vice versa if you could tell me.

We always play music for our cows when they are being milked, they seem to love it, have high yields, better health, are more docile, and there is a scientific basis for this also apparently.

Listening to the (Pastoral) Symphony now by the way, prompted by your thread.

BBC News | SCI/TECH | Sweet music for milking
What else other than the Pastoral would calm cows? I'd read before of the calming effects classical music has on farm animals. I don't find it particularly strange. Whether human or non-human we all have brains. Brains are responsive muscles and this is the one muscle that responds to all kinds of stimulii, whether aural, oral or just touch.

Whenever I feel uptight I'll get in the car, find an empty road, put the boot down and pop in a CD. It can be anything from Mahler to Lynott. Music works in the most peculiar way, taking in a rolled up ball of barbed wire and giving you back a ball of wool.
 

Bea C

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As an epileptic I'd love to know what the f**k is going on.
 

Hewson

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Apr 29, 2009
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As an epileptic I'd love to know what the f**k is going on.
Epilepsy is one illness that would be high on the list for serious research in mapping the brain. I can only compare it to an electrical overload.

The word "epilepsy" comes from the Greek word epi meaning "upon, at, close upon", and the Greek word Leptos meaning "seizure". From those roots we have the Old French word epilepsie, and Latin word epilepsia and the Greek words epilepsia and epilepsies.

According to Medilexicon's medical dictionary, epilepsy is:

"A chronic disorder characterized by paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to excessive neuronal discharge, and usually associated with some alteration of consciousness..."
 

Radix

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Aug 31, 2010
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What else other than the Pastoral would calm cows? I'd read before of the calming effects classical music has on farm animals. I don't find it particularly strange. Whether human or non-human we all have brains. Brains are responsive muscles and this is the one muscle that responds to all kinds of stimulii, whether aural, oral or just touch.

Whenever I feel uptight I'll get in the car, find an empty road, put the boot down and pop in a CD. It can be anything from Mahler to Lynott. Music works in the most peculiar way, taking in a rolled up ball of barbed wire and giving you back a ball of wool.

Our cows love pastoral music, it reminds them of their plush pastures.

We takes them in and relieves them of their wealth.

When does 'The Gathering' start by the way?
 

Radix

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Aug 31, 2010
Messages
10,030
"A chronic disorder characterized by paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to excessive neuronal discharge, and usually associated with some alteration of consciousness..."

But sure this is why I want Ivor Callely to take the mapping test for FF, I mean the guy was bilocating at one stage if you remember.
 

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