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Marie Fleming loses right to die Supreme Court appeal


Sync

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The Supreme Court have made what appears to have been the only ruling they could have made:

It ruled that while the Irish constitution guarantees a right to life there is no corresponding right to die with the help of others.

Delivering the judgement, Chief Justice Susan Denham described it as a "very tragic case".
The courts didn't have a choice here, if we want there to be a "right to die" it needs to be addressed through legislation. So now we have that clear answer from the justice system, the question moves to the govt. they can't bat it to anyone else: do we want to provide a right to die for people in certain circumstances. And yes or no are both reasonable positions, but a position must be taken.
 

rockofcashel

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And it should be. I honestly cannot fathom the refusal of someones right to die, so long as they are mentally competent enough to make the decision for themselves.
 

Keith-M

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There will be no legislation in this area. It is a legal can of worms akin to abortion and why draw another legislative debacle upon your shoulders unnecessarily?
 
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ManInTheArena

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I'd agree with rockofcashel here - hard to see how this woman, who has her full mental faculties, and is fully competent to make a decision, could be denied the choice to avoid a long painful death.
 

damus

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Personally, I feel that everyone should have the right to self-determination around their end of life decisions and it should operate within necessary safeguards, top of that list being your competency to make that informed decision.
 
B

Boggle

Personally, I feel that everyone should have the right to self-determination around their end of life decisions and it should operate within necessary safeguards, top of that list being your competency to make that informed decision.
What gives the state the right to meddle in whether someone wants to die? Once they are of sound mind and they are doing it for rational reasons, then you can only assume that they have made the right decision.

It's a decision that we can not understand. How could we understand when we have never been in a position where we coldly and rationally decided that death was preferable to the life that lay before us?
 

Keith-M

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Personally, I feel that everyone should have the right to self-determination around their end of life decisions and it should operate within necessary safeguards, top of that list being your competency to make that informed decision.
How many people that take their own lives are truly making an "informed decision" rather than finding permanent "solutions" to temporary problems?
 

mr. jings

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The Supreme Court have made what appears to have been the only ruling they could have made:



The courts didn't have a choice here, if we want there to be a "right to die" it needs to be addressed through legislation. So now we have that clear answer from the justice system, the question moves to the govt. they can't bat it to anyone else: do we want to provide a right to die for people in certain circumstances. And yes or no are both reasonable positions, but a position must be taken.
Government clarification? They do love themselves some hot potatoes they do.
 

FrankSpeaks

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damus

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How many people that take their own lives are truly making an "informed decision" rather than finding permanent "solutions" to temporary problems?
If you're terminally ill or if you are suffering from the early stages of Alzheimers for example it's not a "temporary problem" - they are both progressive diseases.
 

Mercurial

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The government ought to legislate for this, so of course they won't.
 

Mercurial

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How many people that take their own lives are truly making an "informed decision" rather than finding permanent "solutions" to temporary problems?
At least one, going by the evidence in this case.
 
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So you anticipate FG addressing this issue?

What is the word on the ground, what timeframe and what is proposed?
I can only see this going to the ECHR.
 

damus

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What gives the state the right to meddle in whether someone wants to die? Once they are of sound mind and they are doing it for rational reasons, then you can only assume that they have made the right decision.

It's a decision that we can not understand. How could we understand when we have never been in a position where we coldly and rationally decided that death was preferable to the life that lay before us?
+1. I know myself that I wouldn't want to be hooked up to life support if I was in a persistent vegetative state. If I was terminally ill, I would like to have the choice around my own end of life decisions. I also know that I would like the choice as to whether I could end my life if I developed a progressive disease like Alzheimers in the future. Obviously, they are opinions that are based on my own values but they are also drawn from what I've seen from my nursing days. I do recognise that they may be unpopular to some though....
 

Dan_Murphy

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+1. I know myself that I wouldn't want to be hooked up to life support if I was in a persistent vegetative state. If I was terminally ill, I would like to have the choice around my own end of life decisions. I also know that I would like the choice as to whether I could end my life if I developed a progressive disease like Alzheimers in the future. Obviously, they are opinions that are based on my own values but they are also drawn from what I've seen from my nursing days. I do recognise that they may be unpopular to some though....
I think they are all understandable opinions.

Personally, I would want the same for any mental degenerative disease, but for any physical ailment I would want everything attempted before I go, even if that means I am more machine than man in the end.
 

borntorum

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I can only see this going to the ECHR.
Her partner was unsure about whether they wanted to go any further with this case.

To be honest, I don't see them having any real hope in Strasbourg either.
 
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