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Marijuana Deaths???


crocked

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Jun 25, 2008
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171
I just recently searched on google for information on marijuana deaths... To my astonishment i couldn't find any statistics. :shock:

Can anyone ,who is either for or against marijuana, provide any information regarding the death statistics for marijuana use in Ireland?

I can however find plenty of statistics on road deaths, work related deaths, alcohol related deaths, tobacco related deaths, other illegal drug related deaths and prescription drug deaths etc...

It's curious when an awful lot of people believe marijuana to be one of the most harmful illegal (plants) "drugs" there is. :eek:
 


Sean O'Brian

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It's curious when an awful lot of people believe marijuana to be one of the most harmful illegal (plants) "drugs" there is.
It's not curious at all, unless you think fatalities are the only harmful effect. (Why do you have "drugs" in inverted commas?)

As Professor Robin Murray, senior consultant psychiatrist at London’s Maudsley Hospital, recently put it: ‘Cannabis is now one of the biggest problems on inpatient psychiatric wards in England’s major cities.’

A clear danger from cannabis
 

TonyBird

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As Professor Robin Murray, senior consultant psychiatrist at London’s Maudsley Hospital, recently put it: ‘Cannabis is now one of the biggest problems on inpatient psychiatric wards in England’s major cities.’
[/URL]
Yes , you can catch 'reefer madness' from as little as one joint apparently . :rolleyes:
Before you castigate me for making light of mental illness , I accuse you of trivialising it by using it in a shaky argument against cannabis .

That quote from the professor sounds more political than scientific . 'Cannabis' is a mental illness now ?
 
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crocked

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Jun 25, 2008
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It's not curious at all, unless you think fatalities are the only harmful effect. (Why do you have "drugs" in inverted commas?)

As Professor Robin Murray, senior consultant psychiatrist at London’s Maudsley Hospital, recently put it: ‘Cannabis is now one of the biggest problems on inpatient psychiatric wards in England’s major cities.’

A clear danger from cannabis
and we could exchange links all day, except the question asked was "Can anyone ,who is either for or against marijuana, provide any information regarding the death statistics for marijuana use in Ireland?".

Chief drug adviser David Nutt sacked over cannabis stance | Politics | The Guardian reports the same guy in your article 1 day later...

and his successor has a different opinion to you also...

http://findarticles.com/p/news-articles/mail-on-sunday-london-england-the/mi_8003/is_2010_Jan_17/drugs-tsar-scoffed-fears-skunk/ai_n48659612/
 

Sean O'Brian

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Yes , you can catch 'reefer madness' from as little as one joint apparently .
Professor Murray doesn't say that.

Before you castigate me for making light of mental illness , I accuse you of trivialising it by using it in a shaky argument against cannabis .
I don't see how pointing to some of the ongoing research on the links between schizophrenia and cannabis use (long-term use, not 'one joint') is trivialising anything.

It's true that we cannot say for definite that cannabis use causes schizophrenia, yet in the 1940's many doctors researching the harmful effects of tobacco use gave up smoking before the proof about the harm of smoking was established in the 1960's.

Here is more of the ongoing research from Professor Murray:

"Day in, day out, I was going to either my outpatient clinic or my inpatient unit and we'd have a patient who would do brilliantly," he says. If they did particularly well, the patients would be allowed to go out for the evening, to enjoy themselves. "The next morning [they] would be psychotic, hearing voices and quite deluded again." And whenever this happened, there was usually one main suspect: the patient had probably smoked cannabis the night before.
It was these concerns that led Murray, a professor of psychiatry at the Maudsley hospital in south London and one of Britain's leading experts on mental health, to carry out investigations into the relationship between cannabis and mental health. What he found was that cannabis almost always exacerbated symptoms of psychosis in people who were already suffering from (or had a family history of) any mental health problems.

"We studied people who recently developed [schizophrenia], then followed them up after four years," says Murray of the initial studies. "The people who were taking cannabis when we first met them and continued taking cannabis were doing three times worse than people who had never taken cannabis. In particular, they still had some of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia."

At that point, Murray began to look deeper. "It's a bit like saying, 'Well, if people with chronic bronchitis smoke, this is not good for their chronic bronchitis'," he says."Then you begin to think, could smoking contribute to developing chronic bronchitis in the first place? Then we started thinking about the question of whether cannabis could contribute to the onset of [psychosis]."
In November 2002, Arsenault's team published her results in the highly respected British Medical Journal.

"The conclusion was that, if you took cannabis at age 18, you were about 60% more likely to go psychotic. But if you started by the time you were 15, then the risk was much greater, around 450%," says Murray.
 
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Sean O'Brian

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and his successor has a different opinion to you also...
Your link says that Professor Iversen scoffed at the notion of the exaggerated potency of so-called "skunk" cannabis, which the press likes to tout as some kind of super-strong form of cannabis, which it isn't. He doesn't contradict anything said by Professor Murray.
 

TonyBird

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Jun 24, 2010
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Cannabis is not to be taken lightly particularly by minors . . However its prohibition is a total joke and a failure . I guess we will have to agree to disagree . This argument is just old and tedious at this stage . Thats not a slight on your goodself btw . Im talking in general , not about your posts.
Goodnight.
 

truthisfree

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Jul 16, 2009
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I think if you are genuinely interested and wish to learn about the cannabis debate there is everything you need to know on threads here about it. The final consensus when the facts were looked at was that cannabis is pretty much harmless, any links between mental illness were not helped at all by the revelations that the studies were carried out in mental hospitals on the patients suffering from various psychosis already.

The real problem is not the tiny possibility that cannabis can cause psychosis but the multi billion industry that fosters a criminal underground for a recreational drug that has not and will not be reduced by stiffer laws and penalties.

The only logical thing to do is legalize it.

I think it was Upton Sinclair who said "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it"
 

locke

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It's pretty hard, if even possible, to actually overdose on marijuana if smoked. Most marijuana related deaths will be as a result of lung cancer. There may also be some suicides because of mental health issues it causes.

But with both it's almost impossible to prove the level of connection. Most marijuana smokers smoke tobacco too, so where does the lung cancer blame go. Are people with underlying mental health issues more likely to smoke marijuana meaning that there is no causal effect?
 

DeputyEdo

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Aug 9, 2010
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This quote here had me wondering....

"Day in, day out, I was going to either my outpatient clinic or my inpatient unit and we'd have a patient who would do brilliantly," he says. If they did particularly well, the patients would be allowed to go out for the evening, to enjoy themselves. "The next morning [they] would be psychotic, hearing voices and quite deluded again." And whenever this happened, there was usually one main suspect: the patient had probably smoked cannabis the night before."

So when they were deluded and hearing voices the next morning, there was one main suspect.,...they'd probably smoked cannabis.
I could use the information above to say that the main suspect was the fact they were released from their ward/clinic for the night. Were those who were not released delusional etc the next day?
 

A view from England

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It's pretty hard, if even possible, to actually overdose on marijuana if smoked. Most marijuana related deaths will be as a result of lung cancer. There may also be some suicides because of mental health issues it causes.

But with both it's almost impossible to prove the level of connection. Most marijuana smokers smoke tobacco too, so where does the lung cancer blame go. Are people with underlying mental health issues more likely to smoke marijuana meaning that there is no causal effect?
And perhaps road deaths through drug driving? A growing issue.
 

A view from England

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Is there any hard facts on this, I'd like to see some figures?
I believe that the technology to catch drug driving is in it's infantcy so there will be stats available in the coming years. It's a bit like drinking alcohol. How may drunks are killed directly by alcohol (liver damage etc), how many are killed in drink related accidents, drunk driving, fights etc. Alcohol is at the root of the problem, the manner of the death is sometimes not caused directly by the drug but by the effect on other functions.
 

locke

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The problem is that drug-driving is a very vague term as there are many different drugs. Marijuana would slow reaction times, which would cause accidents, but its effects would be nothing compared to someone who was driving after cocaine or speed. It would encourage fast driving and combine it with a feeling of invulnerability. Not a good combination at all.
 

Mitsui2

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And perhaps road deaths through drug driving? A growing issue.
It's certainly an issue to which increasing attention is being paid - which is not the same thing as a growing issue per se. But the real issue with "drug driving" is hardly drugs - it's morons getting behind steering wheels when they are - for whatever reason - not fit to be in charge of a car. To single out drugs for attention is to miss the point.

Take the case that's in all today's papers, about the fool who killed that American woman in a car crash in Mayo last year. He was driving an SUV in his bare feet, had made 83 calls on his mobile between Maynooth and the crash-site at Swinford, and may have been on the phone at the time of the actual crash. He had his 5 year old son in the car with him.

There's no suggestion, leastways in an of the reports that I've seen, that this driver was under the influence of drink or drugs. He was certainly, though, under the influence of quite gratuitous foolishness. The case is not, however, an argument for banning bare feet.
 

QuizMaster

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Cannabis is certanly not some harmless toy, and I would not advise anyone to take it up. But I can tell you from experience that alcohol is a more dangerous substance in every way.

As for actual cannabis deaths, I'd say there are probably none.
 

QuizMaster

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How many die in car crashes from stoned driving?
If any, it would be a tiny tiny fraction of the number who die from driving drunk.
Alcohol makes you not only unfit to drive, but makes you feel like you can drive.
In the case of cannabis, not only are you unfit to drive, but you are too paranoid to go anywhere near the wheel. Which is kind of safer.
 

karldaly

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Feb 26, 2009
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465
.
"‘Cannabis is now one of the biggest problems on inpatient psychiatric wards in England’s major cities."
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And it was the Illuminati who shot JFK.

Grow up and get a life for Christ's sake.
Booze causes more damage and destruction per-capita than all other drugs combined.

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