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Medeical Council wants language test for doctors


Clanrickard

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Apr 25, 2008
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33,054
Medical group wants EU-trained doctors to take English test - Independent.ie

Can't see a thread on this and I am surprised there isn't. Thanks to an insane piece of legislation EU trained doctors may not be tested for their level of English. As the piece above shows this can be fatal. It ias frankly unbelievable that this is not the case.

However I am told non_EU doctors are tested yet the testing must be pretty shabby if my family's experience is anything to go by. I have been dealt with in the last 12 months by doctors and nurses from India who had real difficulty speaking English. I had to work hard to understand them. My case was minor but my cousin's (a professional sportsman) was worse. He entered the Cork Regional with a stomach complaint and after testing all the female Indian doctor could say was "go home now all ok". She could not explain the problem to him. A day later he was in A & E with food poisoning thanks to a sharp eyed local GP. Above all jobs shouldn't medical practitioners be forced to have a good standard of English?
 

IbrahaimMohamad

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Feb 5, 2013
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4,226
Medical group wants EU-trained doctors to take English test - Independent.ie

Can't see a thread on this and I am surprised there isn't. Thanks to an insane piece of legislation EU trained doctors may not be tested for their level of English. As the piece above shows this can be fatal. It ias frankly unbelievable that this is not the case.

However I am told non_EU doctors are tested yet the testing must be pretty shabby if my family's experience is anything to go by. I have been dealt with in the last 12 months by doctors and nurses from India who had real difficulty speaking English. I had to work hard to understand them. My case was minor but my cousin's (a professional sportsman) was worse. He entered the Cork Regional with a stomach complaint and after testing all the female Indian doctor could say was "go home now all ok". She could not explain the problem to him. A day later he was in A & E with food poisoning thanks to a sharp eyed local GP. Above all jobs shouldn't medical practitioners be forced to have a good standard of English?
If Gardai and School Teachers need Irish competency why not doctors?

Why can I not do business with my doctor in Irish?
 
L

longshortgrass

If Gardai and School Teachers need Irish competency why not doctors?

Why can I not do business with my doctor in Irish?
It's difficult enough at times to understand what doctors are saying, without getting it in a language that few of us understand.
 

shoneen

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Apr 1, 2011
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The main difficulty I hear of is written, as opposed to spoken English. Even those who have a perfectly good level of conversational English, can fall down when it comes to writing. This is a problem when other people are relying on accurate notes on patients.
 

Picasso Republic

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May 31, 2011
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Last year my father "had to be informed" that he had a few weeks to live (brain tumour), unfortunately this news was broken to him in a 10 minute wholly business like manner by an African Consultant whom it was necessary to ask on many occassions to repeat himself, often still being none the wiser sue to his accent and expressions.

Its really not on.
 

Astral Peaks

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Will there be spelling tests for "Medeical" personnel also?
 

Dr Pat

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It's a horrible nasty wacist demand completely contrary to everything our political, mass migration lobbyists and chattering classes endlessly whine on about.
 

IbrahaimMohamad

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It's a horrible nasty wacist demand completely contrary to everything our political, mass migration lobbyists and chattering classes endlessly whine on about.
If Irish is our first language is it asking too much to ask State paid Doctors to speak it or understand it?
 

Astral Peaks

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It's a horrible nasty wacist demand completely contrary to everything our political, mass migration lobbyists and chattering classes endlessly whine on about.
No, it's a perfectly sensible and legitimate requirement.

Stop with the trolling, okay.
 

Ulster-Lad

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Astral Peaks

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The main difficulty I hear of is written, as opposed to spoken English. Even those who have a perfectly good level of conversational English, can fall down when it comes to writing. This is a problem when other people are relying on accurate notes on patients.
Coming from a family where both parents and two grandparents were doctors, I couldn't agree more!

Even my grandparents who came from a generation where penmanship was far better than it is today, had appalling handwriting.
My father's wasn't too bad, but my mother's is terrible. Chemists would routinely have to phone up to have the 'script details explained/translated.
 

Politics matters

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Joined
Sep 16, 2012
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6,034
Medical group wants EU-trained doctors to take English test - Independent.ie

Can't see a thread on this and I am surprised there isn't. Thanks to an insane piece of legislation EU trained doctors may not be tested for their level of English. As the piece above shows this can be fatal. It ias frankly unbelievable that this is not the case.

However I am told non_EU doctors are tested yet the testing must be pretty shabby if my family's experience is anything to go by. I have been dealt with in the last 12 months by doctors and nurses from India who had real difficulty speaking English. I had to work hard to understand them. My case was minor but my cousin's (a professional sportsman) was worse. He entered the Cork Regional with a stomach complaint and after testing all the female Indian doctor could say was "go home now all ok". She could not explain the problem to him. A day later he was in A & E with food poisoning thanks to a sharp eyed local GP. Above all jobs shouldn't medical practitioners be forced to have a good standard of English?
How about the Irish government start treating Irish doctors with a fairer standard of living and then perhaps we wont have to steal other countries doctors who have poor levels of english?
 

Astral Peaks

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25,986
If Gardai and School Teachers need Irish competency why not doctors?

Why can I not do business with my doctor in Irish?
If one lives in a Gaeltacht area, I see no reason why not.
 

Aindriu

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Coming from a family where both parents and two grandparents were doctors, I couldn't agree more!

Even my grandparents who came from a generation where penmanship was far better than it is today, had appalling handwriting.
My father's wasn't too bad, but my mother's is terrible. Chemists would routinely have to phone up to have the 'script details explained/translated.
Which is precisely why scripts should be printed out by computer. They should be standardised forms too - like the UK - here they vary from badly cut sheets of cheap paper to A4 letterheads.
 

Aindriu

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Last year my father "had to be informed" that he had a few weeks to live (brain tumour), unfortunately this news was broken to him in a 10 minute wholly business like manner by an African Consultant whom it was necessary to ask on many occassions to repeat himself, often still being none the wiser sue to his accent and expressions.

Its really not on.
Accent is the biggest issue in my opinion. In many cases the accents of Indian and African doctors are extremely thick and it is next to impossible to understand what they are saying. There is no need for it either. I work with a lad from Ghana and his english - spoken and written - is impeccable.
 

Blossie

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Last year my father "had to be informed" that he had a few weeks to live (brain tumour), unfortunately this news was broken to him in a 10 minute wholly business like manner by an African Consultant whom it was necessary to ask on many occassions to repeat himself, often still being none the wiser sue to his accent and expressions.

Its really not on.
So sorry for your loss Picasso. I agree, ITS REALLY NOT ON. When my daughter was in hospital, it was a toss up whether we would be seen by the doctor we could understand or by the doctor who could have been speaking any language as we could not understand a word.I ended up discussing her case with my GP who explained in for me in ENGLISH ! It is ridiculous that students who want to study medicine in this country almost always needs to be at straight A level in secondary school,however people from abroad seem to be able to obtain a life and death job with
 

Astral Peaks

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Which is precisely why scripts should be printed out by computer. They should be standardised forms too - like the UK - here they vary from badly cut sheets of cheap paper to A4 letterheads.
Actually, they are standardised forms in the case of GMS scripts, filled out by hand, sometimes by computer in larger practices.
For private scripts, most if not all doctors have standard script pads, often provided free by pharmaceutical companies.

Printing from computer is an option, but not many practices have the funds to invest in the technology (dedicated printer and stock) and the NHS found that GP's didn't have the IT security needed in many cases. They are more suited to the hospital environment.
 

elliebee

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Oct 23, 2011
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Last year my father "had to be informed" that he had a few weeks to live (brain tumour), unfortunately this news was broken to him in a 10 minute wholly business like manner by an African Consultant whom it was necessary to ask on many occassions to repeat himself, often still being none the wiser sue to his accent and expressions.

Its really not on.
That was a complete disgrace and most disrespectful to your father. My elderly mother was in a Nursing Home for a few years and many of the nurses / care assistants were foreign. The poor soul didn't have a clue what most of them were saying and although they were really caring, they may as well having been using sign-language. The problem was compounded by the fact that they simply didn't 'get' the Irish humour at all.
 
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