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Meet Dr Parnia, He brings the dead back to life


seabhcan

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Sam Parnia

Dr Sam Parnia has been resurrecting the dead for 20 years. Parnia is head of intensive care at the Stony Brook University Hospital in New York. He has developed new techniques which can bring back people who have been dead for hours.

Sometimes heart attack patients are brought in and are dead. Parnia hooks them up to his machines which pump oxygen into the blood and cool the body to prevent deterioration. The Surgeons operate, fix the cause of death, and then Parnia turns the person back on.

"The longest I know of is a Japanese girl I mention in the book," Parnia says. "She had been dead for more than three hours. And she was resuscitated for six hours. Afterwards, she returned to life perfectly fine and has, I have been told, recently had a baby."
Parnia argues that the popular concept of what death is, is wrong.

It was a truncated version of this process, at the London Chest Hospital, that allowed the Bolton footballer Fabrice Muamba to be restored to life after he collapsed on the pitch at White Hart Lane last year. Parnia watched the events unfold on TV and subsequently kept on reading that Muamba had been, for up to an hour, "dead" – but always in quotation marks. He laughs. "Journalists have invented a new term, 'clinically dead'. I don't know what that term means. But the fact is Muamba was dead. And it was not by a miracle he was brought back to life, it was by science."
He has some interesting ideas about what happens when you die too. I may buy his book.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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In particular, he asks what exactly happens, if you are lying dead before resuscitation, to your individual self and all its attendant character and memories – your "soul", as he is not shy to call it – before it is eventually restored to you a few hours later?
I wonder is he being provocative here?
 

Goa Tse

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Last edited:

owedtojoy

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Sam Parnia

Dr Sam Parnia has been resurrecting the dead for 20 years. Parnia is head of intensive care at the Stony Brook University Hospital in New York. He has developed new techniques which can bring back people who have been dead for hours.

Sometimes heart attack patients are brought in and are dead. Parnia hooks them up to his machines which pump oxygen into the blood and cool the body to prevent deterioration. The Surgeons operate, fix the cause of death, and then Parnia turns the person back on.



Parnia argues that the popular concept of what death is, is wrong.



He has some interesting ideas about what happens when you die too. I may buy his book.
Interesting - it has been pointed out before that death, or (really) the act of dying, (in comparison to gender, sexual intercourse, conception, gestation and childbirth) is much under-investigated scientifically. The link with "psychic" research makes it a no-no.

I hope for his own sake Parnia stays rigorously materialistic, skeptical and analytical. A lapse into metaphysics and credulity will imperil his research in the eyes of many. Lampoons on Penn & Teller, and attacks by James Randi are the least of his worries.

In this case, the acid test will be replication - can other doctors repeat his methods with success.?
 

seabhcan

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In this case, the acid test will be replication - can other doctors repeat his methods with success.?
The article suggests that it is replicated across the world. Dr Parnia is probably at the forefront of this, but he is far from alone, as the case of Fabrice Muamba demonstrates. Muamba was dead - he is now alive.

 

eoghanacht

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Burn the witch
 

eoghanacht

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Science rocks!
 

Finbar10

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Sam Parnia

Dr Sam Parnia has been resurrecting the dead for 20 years. Parnia is head of intensive care at the Stony Brook University Hospital in New York. He has developed new techniques which can bring back people who have been dead for hours.

Sometimes heart attack patients are brought in and are dead. Parnia hooks them up to his machines which pump oxygen into the blood and cool the body to prevent deterioration. The Surgeons operate, fix the cause of death, and then Parnia turns the person back on.



Parnia argues that the popular concept of what death is, is wrong.



He has some interesting ideas about what happens when you die too. I may buy his book.
Saw this is the Sunday Times last week also. Incredible that people can be brought back several hours after death. Sunday Times article also had some references to NDEs (Near Death Experiences). Seemingly Parnia has done some work in this area.
 

seabhcan

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This raises a whole host of ethical and legal issues.

Should the 'newly dead' have rights to resurrection? What about people who are defined as 'brain dead' - alive in body but so brain damaged that they are not really alive?

How to define death legally if it can be sometimes reversed?

I'm feeling is that 'death' should be defined as some measure of damage. Those who are only a little bit dead should ultimately have some rights, while those how are nonviable but 'alive' should have lesser rights.

Can of worms really. The religious lobby will be very confused.
 

drummed

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This raises a whole host of ethical and legal issues.

Should the 'newly dead' have rights to resurrection? What about people who are defined as 'brain dead' - alive in body but so brain damaged that they are not really alive?

How to define death legally if it can be sometimes reversed?

I'm feeling is that 'death' should be defined as some measure of damage. Those who are only a little bit dead should ultimately have some rights, while those how are nonviable but 'alive' should have lesser rights.

Can of worms really. The religious lobby will be very confused.



If someone comes back after 3 days the fun will be mighty.
 

damus

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They also induce a hypothermic state to increase the chance of survival and neurological recovery post CPR.

I also remember reading about the successful resus of people in accidental hypothermia following drowning.
 

Finbar10

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This raises a whole host of ethical and legal issues.

Should the 'newly dead' have rights to resurrection? What about people who are defined as 'brain dead' - alive in body but so brain damaged that they are not really alive?

How to define death legally if it can be sometimes reversed?

I'm feeling is that 'death' should be defined as some measure of damage. Those who are only a little bit dead should ultimately have some rights, while those how are nonviable but 'alive' should have lesser rights.

Can of worms really. The religious lobby will be very confused.
Parnia's work is probably going to make this even more of a grey area. I suspect there has been a certain pressure over recent decades to make definitions of death less stringent due to the pressure for donor organs. Some countries actually insist on general anesthetic being given to organ donors during the process. Ireland is not one of them as far as I'm aware (though if we had the requirement I suppose it's possible it might put some people off volunteering to be donors in the first place). But must admit I'd be a lot happier to carry a donor card if there was that requirement. How dead is dead? Am not sure this area is all that well understood by medicine.
 

imokyrok

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I was under the impression that irreversible brain damage would be inevitable after only a few minutes of clinical death. If he's keeping blood oxygenising the brain maybe he can prevent that occurrence but surely the person would have had to die practically in front of him or thereabouts.
 
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