Micro-flats are coming to London and could help solving Dublin housing affordability crisis.

Voluntary

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Micro-flats are controversial, some would say they are perfect for singles, students or young couples if designed properly, some others thing these are pure evil destroying lives.
Should we allow similar in Dublin to help solving the housing affordability issue?

The ‘town flats’ are designed to be affordable for people who may otherwise be priced out of living in Zones 1 and 2.

At least half will meet the criteria for the Mayor’s London Living Rents, affordable for people making between £30,000 and £60,000.

Developers U+I plans to build them in blocks with a communal living space, with each flat between 19m squared and 24m squared in floor area.

‘Compact Living is a proven solution in bustling cities such as Tokyo, New York and Paris – places that are less densely populated that London,’ U+I said.



Micro-flats might be just what London needs to solve the housing crisis | Metro News









[video=youtube;gcklkn5ZGZk]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcklkn5ZGZk[/video]
 


Congalltee

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19sq metres. 6m x 3.15m. Basically, a room where one eats, sleep and defecates in.
 

The System Works

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While I am aware of the strong cultural bias in Britain and Ireland towards houses with gardens, I think it would be interesting if some developers here tried building apartments suitable for family living. There appears to be no tradition of that on these islands. But I have seen some impressive examples in Germany: buildings that had communal playrooms where kids have their birthday parties and such, and apartments with utility rooms and the kind of storage space a family realistically needs.
 

talkingshop

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While I am aware of the strong cultural bias in Britain and Ireland towards houses with gardens, I think it would be interesting if some developers here tried building apartments suitable for family living. There appears to be no tradition of that on these islands. But I have seen some impressive examples in Germany: buildings that have communal playrooms where kids have their birthday parties and such, and apartments that had utility rooms and the kind of storage space a family realistically needs.
They tried that to some extent, with new guidelines for increased storage etc, but now many people are complaining (including I think the OP, he may correct me if I am wrong) that the guidelines are too generous, and apartments must be smaller. Hard to know what to do to get it right!
 

sethjem7

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They'll just hollow out a load of decrepit old buildings on the North Circular Road and build cardboard tinderboxes that will go up in flames as soon as you've had your first curried fart whilst watching Ant and Dec's Saturday night takeaway on your Ipad mini. Nothing like a nice picture to sell an illusion.
 

Voluntary

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They tried that to some extent, with new guidelines for increased storage etc, but now many people are complaining (including I think the OP, he may correct me if I am wrong) that the guidelines are too generous, and apartments must be smaller. Hard to know what to do to get it right!
Right, i'm against the exaberated minimum apt size limit imposed on Irish apartments as I believe we should have places to please everyone, small homes for singles, students, young couples and large ones for families. There's no need to centrally regulate what people can buy or how they shoumd live. Give people choice.
Regulations should focus on safety rather than size. People will chose what they want to buy and where they want to live themselves. A lot of family homes could be released if we build small apartments, many young singles would haplily move to smaler homes being cheaper and in more suitable location. Standard of living does not improve if you have large house but pay 3/4 of your salary to keep it going and you spend 2 hours daily commuting.
 

Spirit Of Newgrange

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pack all the dolers off to Longford/cavan/monaghan and hey presto the Dublin housing crisis is fixed.
 

talkingshop

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Right, i'm against the exaberated minimum apt size limit imposed on Irish apartments as I believe we should have places to please everyone, small homes for singles, students, young couples and large ones for families. There's no need to centrally regulate what people can buy or how they shoumd live. Give people choice.
Regulations should focus on safety rather than size. People will chose what they want to buy and where they want to live themselves. A lot of family homes could be released if we build small apartments, many young singles would haplily move to smaler homes being cheaper and in more suitable location. Standard of living does not improve if you have large house but pay 3/4 of your salary to keep it going and you spend 2 hours daily commuting.
Do you envisage the young singles buying or renting these apartments? Also I'm not sure how building more small apartments for young singles will free up family homes?
 

Ardillaun

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I lived in a 168 sq ft 'apartment' in Vancouver for a year and survived the experience. As long as such a place is safe it's better than nothing.
 

NYCKY

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We don't need smaller flats, there is plenty of room, if you go up rather than out.

What is with the phobia of building up in Dublin. Plenty of space in the city, just look upwards.
 

Ardillaun

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Micro-flats are just one element in the Lord knows how many strategies needed to sort the Dublin property market out but they are a good idea. Space is limited.
 

Ardillaun

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We don't need smaller flats, there is plenty of room, if you go up rather than out.

What is with the phobia of building up in Dublin. Plenty of space in the city, just look upwards.
Do that too.
 

dizillusioned

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BADDDDDDD idea. Micro flats are fine for temporary housing but not places that people can live in permanently. If the apartment is THAT small, outdoors becomes more important. Dublin doesn't have the ability for outside living like New York or other cities. The cafe culture the restaurant base, the ease of eating out.

If anything apartments should be family friendly AND higher.
 

blinding

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Micro-flats are controversial, some would say they are perfect for singles, students or young couples if designed properly, some others thing these are pure evil destroying lives.
Should we allow similar in Dublin to help solving the housing affordability issue?



Micro-flats might be just what London needs to solve the housing crisis | Metro News









[video=youtube;gcklkn5ZGZk]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcklkn5ZGZk[/video]
You'd think they could make a more appealing video . That wouldn't get you very interested .
 

Dame_Enda

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Better than sleeping rough. But not great if you have a large family. Not much privacy.
 

Congalltee

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Which would put you off more from living in a high rise tower: Ballymun or Grenfell?
 

Gin Soaked

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Better than sleeping rough. But not great if you have a large family. Not much privacy.
For single people or neat couples, these would be fine.

Also, students, for years, lived in bedside which were kips. It is no insult to anyone's dignity to have crummy accommodation when young.

And maybe people should wait till they can afford to have kids rather than make their entitlement and lack of impulse control the state's problem.
 

Congalltee

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pack all the dolers off to Longford/cavan/monaghan and hey presto the Dublin housing crisis is fixed.
That's up there with deporting the 26,000 undocumented who are on the residency ladder. Or prosecuting landlords in Dublin who are letting property to them. It's funny how, penalising land hoarding, dereliction enablers or taxing air bnb abusers rarely gets seriously pursued, when the poor and huddled masses can be kicked first.
 


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