Micro-flats are coming to London and could help solving Dublin housing affordability crisis.

statsman

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So, the vision is that if you're earning 60 grand a year you can live in a shoebox? Right.
 


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Which would put you off more from living in a high rise tower: Ballymun or Grenfell?
The flats in Ballymun were excellent. The social problems were the issue.
 

hollandia

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Micro-flats are controversial, some would say they are perfect for singles, students or young couples if designed properly, some others thing these are pure evil destroying lives.
Should we allow similar in Dublin to help solving the housing affordability issue?



Micro-flats might be just what London needs to solve the housing crisis | Metro News









[video=youtube;gcklkn5ZGZk]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcklkn5ZGZk[/video]
This is pretty much how I lived in the Netherlands. It can work.
 

Equinox

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Live in a box, work in a box, get burried in one. Talk about the death of the human soul.


It's worth googling 'mouse utopia' just to see how psychologically dammaging this kind of 'society' creates.
 

users

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I am fascinated with micro apartments, the clever ones, not the ones with bloody futons and the like.
I saw this really clever idea for fitting a toilet, basin and shower into a very compact space.
At first glance it looks like there's just a toilet with a wash basin next to it.
The sink however pivots with just a gentle push to lie over the toilet.
The toilet in effect, disappears and looks like a base for the basin.
The space where the basin had been is now obviously a shower with a shower head above and a previously obscured flow control knob and floor drainage revealed.
 

hammer

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If there was more accommodation like this on the various campuses at a reasonable price students would be thrilled. This would free up thousands of apartments / houses around Dublin.

Problem sorted.
 

Congalltee

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If there was more accommodation like this on the various campuses at a reasonable price students would be thrilled. This would free up thousands of apartments / houses around Dublin.

Problem sorted.
So why has the problem persisted on Simon and Eoghan's watch? Are FG privately educated boys, just too far removed from ordinary working people? How many is an acceptable number to die on the streets this winter?
 

mr. jings

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Remember how people used to laugh at the state of Tokyo shoeboxes twenty years ago?
 

Roll_On

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BADDDDDDD idea. Micro flats are fine for temporary housing but not places that people can live in permanently. If the apartment is THAT small, outdoors becomes more important. Dublin doesn't have the ability for outside living like New York or other cities. The cafe culture the restaurant base, the ease of eating out.

If anything apartments should be family friendly AND higher.
Dublin is full of green space, much more so than New York. Plenty of nice cafes too.
 

Casablanca

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I have a Vision of The Future, chum,
The worker's flats in fields of soya beans
Tower up like silver pencils, score on score:
And Surging Millions hear the Challenge come
From microphones in communal canteens
"No Right! No wrong! All's perfect, evermore."
 

users

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The flats in Ballymun were excellent. The social problems were the issue.
You can take a man out of the gutter but you cannot always take the gutter out of a man?
 

Roll_On

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Great stuff. Dublin's suburbs are chocoblock with 24 year olds sharing 3 and 4 bed homes and trying desparately to get a turn on the cooker/in the bathroom. These people don't want to live together but are forced to because the family sized suburban semi d is the only consideration in housing in this country. They'd all much rather a tiny, yet private, space in the City Centre. I know I would've loved it at 23, instead of sharing with boggers who didn't know how to live without a mammy.
 

blinding

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Great stuff. Dublin's suburbs are chocoblock with 24 year olds sharing 3 and 4 bed homes and trying desparately to get a turn on the cooker/in the bathroom. These people don't want to live together but are forced to because the family sized suburban semi d is the only consideration in housing in this country. They'd all much rather a tiny, yet private, space in the City Centre. I know I would've loved it at 23, instead of sharing with boggers who didn't know how to live without a mammy.
I am sure they loved living with you.......Your a barrel of laughs or is it a barrel of Hot Gas......
 

Deadlock

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I have a Vision of The Future, chum,
The worker's flats in fields of soya beans
Tower up like silver pencils, score on score:
And Surging Millions hear the Challenge come
From microphones in communal canteens
"No Right! No wrong! All's perfect, evermore."
I see your Betjeman and raise you a Blur.

[video=youtube;BrbxWOMpwfs]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrbxWOMpwfs[/video]
 

GJG

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Micro-flats are controversial, some would say they are perfect for singles, students or young couples if designed properly, some others thing these are pure evil destroying lives.
Should we allow similar in Dublin to help solving the housing affordability issue?
There is no question that there is an affordability issue. This post presumes that the cause of that is that people (through the market or government regulation) are demanding outrageously lavish accommodation such as separate rooms for cooking and sleeping, driving the price beyond their means.

It’s not.

The cause of our sky-high accommodation prices is a cartel of land-hoarders and developers drip-feed the market, releasing just enough to make them millions without stopping the spiral in prices. There is a fixed amount of money that is the maximum people can spend on accommodation, while still feeding themselves. The demand for accommodation is totally inelastic – people will spend any money not to sleep on the streets, therefore the seller has more power than in most markets.

The aim of the cartel of land-hoarders and developers is to extract all of that money, for as little value as possible. In any other market, that would attract new suppliers, equalising supply and demand, but it’s not possible for people to create new building land, again increasing the power of the sellers. That power is expressed in government decisions to reduce building standards, allowing the cartel to reduce the value while keeping prices high, and for tax breaks, to put even more money in their pockets.

The only way to reduce the cost of accommodation is to rebalance the market in favour of consumers, for example by introducing a penalty for hoarding land.
 

enuffisenuff

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as long as its clean...safe..secure...you don't have to sell a kidney to rent one and for short term accommodation for 1/2 people....go for it
 

Deadlock

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The aim of the cartel of land-hoarders and developers is to extract all of that money, for as little value as possible. In any other market, that would attract new suppliers, equalising supply and demand, but it’s not possible for people to create new building land, again increasing the power of the sellers. That power is expressed in government decisions to reduce building standards, allowing the cartel to reduce the value while keeping prices high, and for tax breaks, to put even more money in their pockets.

The only way to reduce the cost of accommodation is to rebalance the market in favour of consumers, for example by introducing a penalty for hoarding land.
I couldn't agree more. I'd imagine such hoarding isn't only causing a huge problem with housing, but its also preventing regeneration of our cities and many of our larger towns.
 

Florence

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And where are the jobs they are going to get in these places?
I think the Spirit of Newgrange's point is that it is 'dolers' who will be packed off to longford etc ie those who are not working anyway and who possibly don't really want to work so it makes no difference where they actually get their dole. An influx of people into smaller places might create some limited work opportunities. They need the basics like food, and schools for their children. The local schools could qualify for more teachers perhaps.
 


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