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Hunter-Gatherer

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Gaeilge is the only protection we have from rampant uncontrolled multiculturalism.

gaeilge for jobs in teaching, civil service, university places, driving licenses, dole eligibility.

of course the problem is that all the lazy irish knackers in ireland couldnt be bothered learning our native tongue. And thus Ireland turns into another mcDonalds society like England or the US. Plastic, sleazy, linguistic ghettoes everywhere, crime, terrorism etc etc.
 

Watcher2

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Not comfortably.

People like to buy things in their own language.
Your point?

The fact of the matter is, for the jobs that require selling in foreign languages (I presume that's what you mean), we have plenty supply of Europeans (mostly European languages in the call centres) coming here for a few years to improve their English have fun for a few years. Many do stay but unlikely their intent when deciding to come here initially.

And the fact of the matter is, these are low level jobs and not necessarily sustainable. We should be concentrating on bigger things like science and maths which we do badly.
 

Watcher2

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I would have agreed with this 100% up until recently. Every time I go to continental Europe, anyone under the age of 40 seems to able to converse fluently in English, no matter where you are.

I've been involved in software in my industry recently though and language localisation becomes very important when you are looking to bring on board Asian clients.
Chinese\Japanese\Korean\Malay etc

So from a European perspective, you might be right but globally I would not concur.
But we are looking big picture here and I bring you back to my point above in relation to diversity. The languages other than English are localized to those countries generally. What kind of "spread" do we need in order to make an impact with languages? Its often mentioned about other countries "doing" English so well. Well, English is a common "commodity" the world over so its an easy choice as regards language teaching. Malay on the other hand has limited appeal, no?

So my point is more around bang for the buck. If it was to be a choice between "foreign language" and science or tech, it really should be an easy choice.
 

Hunter-Gatherer

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General Urko

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lets get the Poles speaking proper English. Including such exotic concepts as : Please, thank you, excuse me, and ''no, i guess i am behaving like a skankhole for dropping litter and refusing to pick it up''
I haven't found the Poles to be like that, but I have found any amount of our native rubbish to be so!
 

Hunter-Gatherer

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with the approaching Brexit, the irish may need to reconsider their constant ass-kissing of the EU. Paying EU debts, speaking their languages, dancing to their drum.

Maybe the US, UK, Australia etc is our future. The only worthwhile use of French is to say 'i am on Strike, dont hassle me or i will sue you' , of Mediterreanan languages its to say 'i am unemployed' , of German its 'two beers please' and of Polish its 'all of the above'
 

EUrJokingMeRight

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Now watch and see how the teacher's unions move to block this just as they do with all proposed reforms (or grudgingly accept in return for a nice fat payoff).

The unions are the most change-resistant group in Irish society. And the least aligned to the public interest.
Yep. ************************k these ParaSites.
 

Breanainn

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lets get the Poles speaking proper English. Including such exotic concepts as : Please, thank you, excuse me, and ''no, i guess i am behaving like a skankhole for dropping litter and refusing to pick it up''
Presumably the parents are learning the language to help their children with homework when they are being taught English?
 

GDPR

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In reality, FG's policy for improving language skills in Ireland is simply to import native speakers of all other languages though mass immigration - and put them working in call centers. FG has absolutely no intention of improving the educational standard of the Native Irish. That would cost money - and besides - FG hopes the Native Irish will all emigrate and leave Ireland to the landowners and their immigrant coolies.
 

GDPR

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lets get the Poles speaking proper English. Including such exotic concepts as : Please, thank you, excuse me, and ''no, i guess i am behaving like a skankhole for dropping litter and refusing to pick it up''
I like eating out in the six counties as you nearly always get Irish people serving you the food. Nobody will suggest that it's a pleasant experience having an Eastern European waiter or waitress.
 

im axeled

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will he provide the necessary number of teachers, will he start them at slave wage rates, is it possible to make a better fist of it than our native language
 

greengoose2

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I would regard fluency in another language as a skill which should require a premium level payment to an extent!
However, TBH, with a universal translator and every fúcktard ass hole then regarding themselves as fluent in several languages, where they might not in cases be even fluent in one, it will be virtually as impactful as the fall of The Berlin Wall had on East Germans who had the Russian language as their primary offering to the new job market down the line!

Universal translator Eng-Fr and Fr back to Eng:



I consider fluency in another language as a skill that should require a higher level payment to some extent!However, TBH, with a universal translator and every fücktard hole, then speak fluent in several languages, where they might not even reach a single case, it will be practically as impacting as the fall of the Berlin Wall on the " East Germans who have had the Russian language as the main offer of the new online job market!
Presque parfait or something in that region.

I consider fluency in another language as a skill that should require a higher level payment to some extent!However, TBH, with a universal translator and every fücktard hole, then speak fluent in several languages, where they might not even reach a single case, it will be practically as impacting as the fall of the Berlin Wall on the " East Germans who have had the Russian language as the main offer of the new online job market!
 

Dame_Enda

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I always found it easier to speak and write French than I did to understand how French people speak it which is so fast. My two second level French teachers had a terrible temper so if I had questions I tended not to ask them, resulting in mistakes which prompted him to go ballistic and sometimes tear pages out of my workbook. Get the cranky teachers out of language subjects.
 

Cellachán Chaisil

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English is the great magpie language stealing from all others, probably, part of the reason for its success. Irish is neither Germanic nor Latin based, English is a mixture of both, though, more Germanic (mind you very few words have directly made it across unchanged from its Germanic cousins).
I have the greatest regard for our national language, but given that it has only 11 irregular verbs, it is quite a difficult language to learn.
Indeed if your mother tongue is either Germanic or Latin based, an average person could probably become fluent in one Germanic and one Latin based Language together, before he/she could become fluent in Irish!
I'm trying my hardest to make sense of this point. Fewer irregular verbs increases the difficulty?
 

Cellachán Chaisil

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Your point?

The fact of the matter is, for the jobs that require selling in foreign languages (I presume that's what you mean), we have plenty supply of Europeans (mostly European languages in the call centres) coming here for a few years to improve their English have fun for a few years. Many do stay but unlikely their intent when deciding to come here initially.

And the fact of the matter is, these are low level jobs and not necessarily sustainable. We should be concentrating on bigger things like science and maths which we do badly.
I don't think we do. I think that's one of the reasons we lose out on European FDI. We're not competent enough in dealing with those countries.
 

ergo2

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In Western, Northern and Southern Europe even the beggars seem to speak English fluently!
In Berlin last year met many more beggars than in previous years. Most seemed to be East European. They were much more polite than those you met in Dublin. They begged thru' German or English. Some able bodied men rather than winos.

I always refused politely thru' Irish. If any traces of Connacht Irish are ever found in Kreusberg area of Berlin I will modestly claim the credit
 

HarshBuzz

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In Berlin last year met many more beggars than in previous years. Most seemed to be East European. They were much more polite than those you met in Dublin. They begged thru' German or English. Some able bodied men rather than winos.

I always refused politely thru' Irish. If any traces of Connacht Irish are ever found in Kreusberg area of Berlin I will modestly claim the credit
"hello sir, have you got a spare 50 cents?"

"why yes I do, thank you very much for asking" <keeps walking>
 

JCR

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Gaeilge is the only protection we have from rampant uncontrolled multiculturalism.

gaeilge for jobs in teaching, civil service, university places, driving licenses, dole eligibility.

of course the problem is that all the lazy irish knackers in ireland couldnt be bothered learning our native tongue. And thus Ireland turns into another mcDonalds society like England or the US. Plastic, sleazy, linguistic ghettoes everywhere, crime, terrorism etc etc.
That's English actually, let s not try and work this delusion that Irish is somehow "our" language when most people can't even understand it. Its the nationalism that is attached to Gaelic that puts many off, that and the fact that it is practically the only reason to learn it, and its an outdated idea anyway.
 

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