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Misneach to hold public meeting / Cruinniú poiblí Misneach


O Luain

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Beidh cruinniú poiblí ar siúl ag Misneach chun Athbheochan na Gaeilge a phlé, Dé Máirt an 26ú Márta i gCois Teallaigh, Comhdháil Náisiúnta na Gaeilge ag a 7.30i.n.

Aoichainteoirí:

Aindrias Ó Cathasaigh: 'An Ghaeilge agus an Réabhlóid'
Feargal Mac Ionnrachtaigh: 'Athghabháil na Gaeilge sa Mhílaois Úr'

Bi mar ball den ocaid: http://www.facebook....68652839936303/

Lean Misneach ar facebook: http://www.facebook.com/misneach2012

---------------------

Misneach will hold a public meeting to discuss the Revival of the Irish Language, on Tuesday 26 March in Cois Teallaigh, Comhdháil Náisiúnta na Gaeilge, 46 Kildare Street, Dublin @7.30pm

Speakers:

Aindrias Ó Cathasaigh: 'The Irish Language and the Revolution'
Feargal Mac Ionnrachtaigh: 'The Reconquest of Irish in the new Millenium'

Join the event: http://www.facebook....68652839936303/

Follow Misneach on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/misneach2012
 


statsman

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Beidh cruinniú poiblí ar siúl ag Misneach chun Athbheochan na Gaeilge a phlé, Dé Máirt an 26ú Márta i gCois Teallaigh, Comhdháil Náisiúnta na Gaeilge ag a 7.30i.n.

Aoichainteoirí:

Aindrias Ó Cathasaigh: 'An Ghaeilge agus an Réabhlóid'
Feargal Mac Ionnrachtaigh: 'Athghabháil na Gaeilge sa Mhílaois Úr'

Bi mar ball den ocaid: http://www.facebook....68652839936303/

Lean Misneach ar facebook: http://www.facebook.com/misneach2012

---------------------

Misneach will hold a public meeting to discuss the Revival of the Irish Language, on Tuesday 26 March in Cois Teallaigh, Comhdháil Náisiúnta na Gaeilge, 46 Kildare Street, Dublin @7.30pm

Speakers:

Aindrias Ó Cathasaigh: 'The Irish Language and the Revolution'
Feargal Mac Ionnrachtaigh: 'The Reconquest of Irish in the new Millenium'

Join the event: http://www.facebook....68652839936303/

Follow Misneach on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/misneach2012
Which revolution?
 

statsman

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Tuigim go mbeidh sé ag caint air i dtéarmaí stairiúla ginerálta chomh maith le tagairt don todhchaí. Mar sin bheinn ag siúl go labhródh sé faoi tréimhse réabhlóideach 1913-1921 agus b'fhéidir ceann 1969-1998.

I believe that he'll address the theme in a general sense, both historically and with an eye towards the future. Therefore I'd imagine he'd touch on the revolutionary periods of 1913-1921 as well as 1969-1998 too.
There was a revolution in 1969-1998? Where?
 

O Luain

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There was a revolution in 1969-1998? Where?
In plenty of places around the world actually during that period, but there was one in the north of the country.

It was brought about by people who were willing to sacrifice their lives for their political beliefs. More than I can say for someone who has 23,000+ posts (90% of which are probably pointless trolling posts) on an internet forum.
 

Hewson

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O Luain

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San tuaischeart. Ca raibh tu?

(how do I do sine fadas on an iPad?)
He either wasn't born or was behind a typewriter. It'd be good if the thread could stay on topic and not be de-railed because of a troll's lack of historical knowledge.
 

statsman

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San tuaischeart. Ca raibh tu?

(how do I do sine fadas on an iPad?)
He either wasn't born or was behind a typewriter. It'd be good if the thread could stay on topic and not be de-railed because of a troll's lack of historical knowledge.
Whatever it was that went on in the North, it most distinctly was not a revolution.
 

Hewson

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Whatever it was that went on in the North, it most distinctly was not a revolution.
I would consider that the overthrow of one of Europe's most corrupt, bigoted, gerrymandering and sectarian of governments was worthy of the term 'revolution'.
 

O Luain

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Who? What?
'Activists to launch Irish Language group'

A radical new Irish Language group will be launched in Dublin in three weeks time. Misneach will hold its first public meeting in Cois Teallaigh, Comhdháil Náisiúnta na Gaeilge, Kildare Street on Tuesday, March 26 at 7.30pm. The meeting will explore a number of topics concerning the language. Independent lrish language activist Aindrias Ó Cathasaigh will speak about the role of the Irish language in the revolution. Belfast native and Misneach member Feargal Mac Ionnrachtaigh will then give a talk entitled ‘The Re-conquest of Irish in the new Millennium’. The overall theme of the meeting will be the future of Irish as a spoken daily language.

Misneach draws its members primarily from Dublin, Belfast and Galway. Similar meetings to the one in Dublin in three weeks time are planned in other towns and cities throughout the country in the near future.

Spokesperson for Misneach, Kerron Ó Luain remarked on the current state of the Irish language

‘Sociolinguists are in broad agreement that the Irish language will cease to exist as a communally used language in less than twenty years. Only in the Gaeltachtaí is the language used communally on a daily basis. And they are in a state of rapid decay. While the growth of the Irish language schooling sector is certainly positive, as language revivalists Misneach realise the importance of the survival of the Gaeltachtaí if a true revival is to be achieved. It is near impossible to successfully revive a language once it is no longer used communally.’

Ó Luain continued by pointing out the need for a truly radical Irish language group
‘Our goal is to reverse this trend of decline. The first step in doing this will be no longer accepting the half-measures and mealy-mouthed words of politicians. These over-paid representatives claim to be on the language’s side. Yet last year saw a revised Language Act rushed through Leinster House with only tokenistic opposition. The weakness of the Act as it stands will not save the Gaeltacthaí.’

Ó Luain concluded by pointing to the achievements of Misneach founded by Máirtín Ó Cadhain in the 1960s.

‘When Misneach was initially established the language found itself under attack from certain quarters within the media and literary world. The ‘Language Freedom Movement’ was launching attacks on the status of Irish in public life. Ó Cadhain and others were successful in shaming these cultural quislings in the eyes of the public. Today the language finds itself subject to vitriolic attacks on a regular basis in the media, which demeans its standing further. Meanwhile successive governments have failed, and are failing, to act to secure its status and survival. Misneach are calling for direct action in the vein of other language groups in countries such as Wales and Brittany to fight for strong language legislation, language rights and to oppose those in the establishment who would love nothing more than to see Irish speakers made into second-class citizens.’

Ends
 

O Luain

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Whatever it was that went on in the North, it most distinctly was not a revolution.
Noun
A forcible overthrow of a government or social order for a new system.
(in Marxism) The class struggle that is expected to lead to political change and the triumph of communism.

Based on the first definition; there was definitely force involved (that of the IRA), which led to a new the demise of the Orange State as it was
 

hiding behind a poster

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In plenty of places around the world actually during that period, but there was one in the north of the country.

It was brought about by people who were willing to sacrifice their lives for their political beliefs. More than I can say for someone who has 23,000+ posts (90% of which are probably pointless trolling posts) on an internet forum.
Actually if you look a bit closer at your so-called "revolution" in the north of this country during 1969-98, you'll find an awful lot of people who were willing to sacrifice other people's lives for their political beliefs, but very few who were prepared to sacrifice their own.
 

O Luain

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Actually if you look a bit closer at your so-called "revolution" in the north of this country during 1969-98, you'll find an awful lot of people who were willing to sacrifice other people's lives for their political beliefs, but very few who were prepared to sacrifice their own.
Joining the IRA during the 70s and 80s either meant a long prison stretch or death. I've never heard of any who volunteered who thought otherwise.
 

cathalbrugha

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Faraor níl an maoiniú againn ag an bpointe seo an teicneolaíocht a chíos agus aistritheoir a fhostú, ach is rud gur mhaith linn a dhéanamh amach anseo. Beidh an chruinniú seo as Gaeilge.

Unfortunately we haven't the funding to employ a translator or the necessary technology to provide that service, although it's something we'd like to be able to do in the future. This meeting will be in Irish.
It sounds like a great initiative, but I think you've already isolated 98% of the population. As you've rightly pointed out the bunscoils are a strength, but I think the audience you're aiming for is perhaps the older generation, and I think it's a bad idea to approach it with a Headmasters attitude.. Bare in mind that a lot of Irish people are still haunted by Peig.. This meeting will be in Irish even conjures up images of a Dominatrax with a whip, beating the Gaelic back into the peeple who've had the language knocked out of them for centurys.. Go n-éirí libh ar aon chaoi (Sounds like - Go n-irey liv air a-in quee) The best of luck to yiz anyhooo..
 

hiding behind a poster

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Joining the IRA during the 70s and 80s either meant a long prison stretch or death. I've never heard of any who volunteered who thought otherwise.
Bully for you, but it actually meant death for other people, far more than for the Provos themselves. Sure look at the Provos, they whined and moaned when three of their people were killed in Gibraltar, and ultimately were pushed towards a ceasefire by the fact that Loyalist terrorists in Tyrone and surrounding areas were getting uncomfortably good at killing them. They were just grand with war, until it meant running the risk of getting killed - probably the most cowardly "revolutionaries" ever.
 

hiding behind a poster

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This meeting will be in Irish even conjures up images of a Dominatrax with a whip, beating the Gaelic back into the peeple who've had the language knocked out of them for centurys.. Go n-éirí libh ar aon chaoi (Sounds like - Go n-irey liv air a-in quee) The best of luck to yiz anyhooo..
To be fair, you might actually get MORE people along if you advertised that side of it......
 

cathalbrugha

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To be fair, you might actually get MORE people along if you advertised that side of it......
Cén taobh? (Soundslike kane tave?) Which side?

Peig a casann dha shlí? (Peig a kass-in gaw h-lee?) Peig who swings both ways?

Two cracks of the whip for each absent fada?

I just think that older people would be more attracted to learning Irish if it was done in a fun way.. I've sat in Conradh Na Gaeilge reading groups to have an appretiation of why some people would be turned off learning Irish, although such reading groups suit some people.. On the flip side I've been to Irish-speaking groups in the past were the emphasis has been solely on having the craic and learning a few new words.. I don't mean to be disrespectful, but I'd find that Misneach meeting a bit intimadating .. I can only imagine how others would find it.. But I honestly think it's a brilliant idea .. Club Bród fell flat on its face iinm, because they'd no foundations put in place, and perhaps a group like Misneach will alter that.. An t-athair O'Gromhnaigh done it in the late 19 century with a Simple Lessons in Irish.. A fella I know once explained a very simple way of learning Irish to me, that anyone with the interest could pick up.. He basically said that if you spend 20-30 minutes in a room with people with no Irish at all that you can start with something as simple as a door..

Sin dorais - That's a door
Tusa - You
Céard é sin? - What is that?
Sin doras - That's a door

Té go dtí an doras - Go to the door
Oscail an doras - Open the door
Dun an doras - Shut the door

Before you know it, the class/group have picked up ther first 10 words. It can be as simple as that.. Another thing which was pointed out to me is that Irish people actually have an Irish vocabulary already, and teaching can be merely a way of activating that knowledge.. You won't find Irish people half as shy trying to learn any other language, it is actually a psychological thing.. We actually hate our own language and culture, or at least some people do, and the reasons run far deeper than Peig, and the lack of eroticism in the spoken language..

Beir greim orm
Cás do lámh timpeall orm...

I'll Quit that little poem whilst I'm ahead háhá
 

O Luain

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Bully for you, but it actually meant death for other people, far more than for the Provos themselves. Sure look at the Provos, they whined and moaned when three of their people were killed in Gibraltar, and ultimately were pushed towards a ceasefire by the fact that Loyalist terrorists in Tyrone and surrounding areas were getting uncomfortably good at killing them. They were just grand with war, until it meant running the risk of getting killed - probably the most cowardly "revolutionaries" ever.
Bully for you, but it actually meant death for other people, far more than for the Provos themselves. Sure look at the Provos, they whined and moaned when three of their people were killed in Gibraltar, and ultimately were pushed towards a ceasefire by the fact that Loyalist terrorists in Tyrone and surrounding areas were getting uncomfortably good at killing them. They were just grand with war, until it meant running the risk of getting killed - probably the most cowardly "revolutionaries" ever.
If you're referring to Billy Wrigth's LVF then you're talking yet more nonsense, since their main victims were all Catholic civilians with little or no connection to the Republican Movement.

As for Republicans being killed more frequently as the Ceasefire neared, this is also untrue. Roughly 400 Republicans were killed over the 30 years, the majority of those in the 70s which were most intense. So those who followed them clearly knew there was a high chance they could be killed, especially factoring in that there was never more than 600 on active service at any one time.

Your arguments hold no water.
 

O Luain

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It sounds like a great initiative, but I think you've already isolated 98% of the population. As you've rightly pointed out the bunscoils are a strength, but I think the audience you're aiming for is perhaps the older generation, and I think it's a bad idea to approach it with a Headmasters attitude.. Bare in mind that a lot of Irish people are still haunted by Peig.. This meeting will be in Irish even conjures up images of a Dominatrax with a whip, beating the Gaelic back into the peeple who've had the language knocked out of them for centurys.. Go n-éirí libh ar aon chaoi (Sounds like - Go n-irey liv air a-in quee) The best of luck to yiz anyhooo..
Our short-term goal is not to create more Irish speakers. This is of course our goal in the long run. However to do that we need to create Irish language activists first, for it is they who promote the language best. Therefore our target audience are those in their late teens and early 20s who are finishing secondary or in college and have come to realise the value of the Irish language. It is our intention to provide them with a vehicle where they can fight for the language and promote it. This is what generates the schools and the fluent speakers and finally the living communities of speakers.
 

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