Moral dilemma - refusing to treat a patient



Luigi Vampa

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A Jewish surgeon in Germany refused to operate on a patient after seeing a Nazi tattoo on the patient's arm. The surgeon had another doctor finish the procedure and told the patient's wife "I am Jewish, I will not operate on your husband"

Jewish Surgeon Walks Out on Nazi Patient - Jewish World - Israel News - Israel National News

Do you think the doctor was right or wrong?
Lucky for the Nazi. Nazi's had no problem operating on Jews.

What about the Jewish Pathologist who decided to leave his used rubber gloves in the skull of the dead Irish UN soldier after his autopsy ?
 

controller

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I wonder if a Palestinian Doctor refused to operate on a Jewish patient would there be an outcry??
 

A Time for Every Purpose

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Well there was a Reason ,Jesus told us to forgive,even if if we believed in 'justice',
ie if the person shows any remorse etc.
Jewish people and they have shown it beilieve in an eye for an eye.
You would think no one lost their lives ,or suffered sorrow in the last war but them.
After 65 years the endless films, holcaust day , programmes,and then this kind of thing.
I have a special spot for Jewish people,but it is wearing thin.

When will they make a film about the Jews who instigated murder of their own ?
and collaborated with the Nazis to do so ?
 

Clanrickard

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I was in hospital in Ennis last week and one of the questions to be answered was "Any ethnic preferences?"
 

Aristodemus

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The doctor was wrong
 

Ingersoll

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The Doctor was wrong - some thing are just intuitively wrong, refusing to help another is surely the most basic. That being said, from here I sit in ivory-tower.
 

Radix

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There is a a greviously ill patient on the operating table at the moment as we speak.

The patient will probably die if it doesn't receive the urgent transfusion it immediately needs.

The problem is, that the patient's illness was caused by the patient's own behaviour which to say the least was behaviour of a selfish type.

Those who could give the necessary transfusion, remain unconvinced that the patient will ammend it's behaviour when it recovers.

Should the patient receive the transfusion in the abscence of providing some assurance to those who could ensure it's survival?
 

drkpower

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Conscientious Objection in medicine is typically concerns a refusal to performm some procedure/provide a treatment which conflicts with the doctors ethics & values. I fully support this right assuming appropriate safeguards are in place (particularly that a 'timely appropriate referral' is made).

Refusing to treat on the basis of the moral worthiness of the particular patient is a very different situation and one which should not be tolerated, except in perhaps some exceptional circumstances or where the care of the patient may actually be jeapordised.
 

Warren Poynt

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As someone who has much respect for ordinary decent Israelis, as distinct from the extreme right wing who frequently occupy key political, defence and other positions in that country or their bigoted, sectarian spokespersons who have no difficulty in supporting their most vile, nasty and cruel actions, I welcome this debate.

No, I think doctors, all doctors, should treat patients as they present and not just those they are in political, religious or in cultural empathy with.

This might mean, for instance, hospital doctors having to treat:

*Paedophiles or murderers admitted with ill health or injuries from our prisons.

* Drug addicts and criminal gangs leaders who may be responsisble for causing devastation to others.

*Perjurers, fraudsters, wife-beaters, drunks, political and ecocnomic gangsters.

*People of different political, sexual, and religious orientation.

In Ireland, they are even obliged to treat corrupt bankers, members of the FF Golden Circle, members of Parliament who 'sell' their Dail vote to the FF'GP Govt, and a whole host of neer-do-wells.

Even in Israel , doctors are and have been obliged to treat Nazi thugs who may have fled Europe after WW-2

IN the Europe we live in today, doubt if any Christian doctor would refuse to treat an Israeli patient with say extreme right Jewish slogan tatooed on his body or carrying violent emotions towards one in five fellow Israeli citizens............irrespective of the torment and represssion visited upon Palestinians by Israel.

In any case, Israel today gives a warm welcome to offspring of Nazi families.

And in Israel Jewish doctors have much experience in treatment of fanatical Muslim killers aand their victims, Jewish or otherwise.

But......there may be cases .....where conscientious objection might be permissable.

Or am I wrong in this ?
 
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drjimryan2

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a complex area.......

the doctor (imo) was wrong.........however, at least he was in a position to see another doctor.......

now imagine, a patient who was not 'treated' by a doctor, for whatever reason but who couldnt see anybody else because of the 'community care area' system.........

now thats wrong, but happens in this country every day....
 

Tin Foil Hat

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A Jewish surgeon in Germany refused to operate on a patient after seeing a Nazi tattoo on the patient's arm. The surgeon had another doctor finish the procedure and told the patient's wife "I am Jewish, I will not operate on your husband"

Jewish Surgeon Walks Out on Nazi Patient - Jewish World - Israel News - Israel National News

Do you think the doctor was right or wrong?
Moral Dilemma? I'm not sure that you understand the exact meaning of the term.
This isn't a moral dilemma. This is simply a surgeon who couldn't leave his politics outside the operating theatre and refused to do his job. Of course he was wrong.
 

myksav

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A Jewish surgeon in Germany refused to operate on a patient after seeing a Nazi tattoo on the patient's arm. The surgeon had another doctor finish the procedure and told the patient's wife "I am Jewish, I will not operate on your husband"

Jewish Surgeon Walks Out on Nazi Patient - Jewish World - Israel News - Israel National News

Do you think the doctor was right or wrong?
I would say he was not right to do so.*

He could have taken a superior moral position as a doctor in treating a patient regardless of the patients possible/probable political ideology.
He put his religious/ethnic affiliations ahead of his profession of medical practise.


*Unless the sight of a swastika enfuriated the doctor to the point where his medical skills were negated.
 

shutuplaura

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I guess it depends. If the doctor was the only one available and the patient was critical then it would be wrong. Otherwise (as was the case I gather) it would be understandable. Personally I think that the doctor should have treated him to be the bigger person in all of this but then I'm never going to be in that situation so I'm not sure how I'd feel.
 

CookieMonster

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I don't think the Doctor was wrong. The patient wasn't denied treatment as the doctor instructed another doctor to finish the procedure.

To add, while I am not jewish I would certainly consider allowing somebody else treat a patient with a nazi tattoo.
 

splashy

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I don't think the Doctor was wrong. The patient wasn't denied treatment as the doctor instructed another doctor to finish the procedure.

To add, while I am not jewish I would certainly consider allowing somebody else treat a patient with a nazi tattoo.
Are you a doctor, CM, or are you speaking hypothetically there?

I agree with you. It might even be better for the patient as his next surgeon won't be under so much emotional stress while wielding the scalpel.
 

jimwin

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Moral Dilemma? I'm not sure that you understand the exact meaning of the term.
This isn't a moral dilemma. This is simply a surgeon who couldn't leave his politics outside the operating theatre and refused to do his job. Of course he was wrong.
+1
 


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