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More lifestock in arid regions actually reverses desertification


seabhcan

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Sep 3, 2007
Messages
14,327
This great TED talk by Zimbabwe's Dr. Allan Savory

[video=youtube;vpTHi7O66pI]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpTHi7O66pI[/video]

Dr. Savory has spent the last 40 years, following a brief political career in the 70's, formulating a way of using cattle to actually reverse desertification of arid land. The principle is very simple - grasslands evolved in tandem with large herds of wild grazing livestock and their activity is vital for the lifecycle of these environments.

Environmentalists still tell us that meat, and the animals that produce it, are bad for the environment and for climate change. Savory's methods, if used on only half of the world's arid grasslands that are at risk of desertification, would absorb more CO2 than is currently emitted by all industrial sources - and feed millions to boot.

Its a no brainer. More cows means a better world. Eat meat, save humanity.
 

drummed

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If we eat them they won't be grazing?
 

Ed O'Leary

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So as regards the Sahara about 10,000 years ago - who went first? - the cattle or the rain?

its an interesting theory - but a theory - Cattle need grass -grass needs rain or water above all else - can cattle raindance? - over to you Drummed!

Not a problem we'll have to worry about anytime soon in any case
 

drummed

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Did you not start this thread a few days ago as well? What happpened that thread?
 

seabhcan

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So as regards the Sahara about 10,000 years ago - who went first? - the cattle or the rain?

its an interesting theory - but a theory - Cattle need grass -grass needs rain or water above all else - can cattle raindance? - over to you Drummed!

Not a problem we'll have to worry about anytime soon in any case
Watch the video if you can. The Sahara is too dry, but there are vast 'arid' lands which get plenty of rain for part of the year, and are dry the rest of the time. Trampled grass retains water which the next year's grass can use. Cattle dung provides nutrients for the soil.
 

GDPR

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Did you not start this thread a few days ago as well? What happpened that thread?
It's in Environment. At least it was there last time I looked.

I guess this one will be merged, though it has a more informative title than the first.
 

GDPR

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So as regards the Sahara about 10,000 years ago - who went first? - the cattle or the rain?

its an interesting theory - but a theory - Cattle need grass -grass needs rain or water above all else - can cattle raindance? - over to you Drummed!

Not a problem we'll have to worry about anytime soon in any case
If you watch the video you will see that it does work. There are benefits for Ireland in that there may be fewer economic migrants from countries which have regained pastures.
 

Dadaist

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Mar 30, 2012
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13,803
So if we move all the Brazillian beef farmers to the Sahara, that would be one hell of a problem solved.

Sounds interesting though.

I haven't been back to TED in a while, great site.
 

drummed

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If you watch the video you will see that it does work. There are benefits for Ireland in that there may be fewer economic migrants from countries which have regained pastures.


Such as you? Moving from Australia to London to Offaly?
 

pragmaticapproach

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Joined
Jul 21, 2010
Messages
8,817
This great TED talk by Zimbabwe's Dr. Allan Savory

[video=youtube;vpTHi7O66pI]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpTHi7O66pI[/video]

Dr. Savory has spent the last 40 years, following a brief political career in the 70's, formulating a way of using cattle to actually reverse desertification of arid land. The principle is very simple - grasslands evolved in tandem with large herds of wild grazing livestock and their activity is vital for the lifecycle of these environments.

Environmentalists still tell us that meat, and the animals that produce it, are bad for the environment and for climate change. Savory's methods, if used on only half of the world's arid grasslands that are at risk of desertification, would absorb more CO2 than is currently emitted by all industrial sources - and feed millions to boot.

Its a no brainer. More cows means a better world. Eat meat, save humanity.
Notice how the regions where the most heavy desertification tends to occur, state ownership( U.S federal owned land) or heavy interference is most readily apparent.

Tragedy of the commons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The only way to ensure the the best solutions are implemented and land is maintained and utilised in as productive a manner as possible is a strong system of private property something socialists and social democrats will never fully appreciate.
 

GDPR

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Such as you? Moving from Australia to London to Offaly?
I have now moved to Planet Grace. Do keep up (though probably you don't want to being a Kilkenny farmer).

Also I am not an economic migrant. I am an Irish citizen, a genuine Plastic Paddy. :cool:
 
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